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An overhead shot of a pile of steamed mussels in a bowl with grilled bread.
Beer-steamed mussels at Fin & Brew.
Fin & Brew

A Guide to Westchester County’s Top Restaurants

Local talent and celebrity chefs lead the diverse range of restaurants just north of NYC

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Beer-steamed mussels at Fin & Brew.
| Fin & Brew

Located between New York City and the upper Hudson Valley, Westchester is often overshadowed by its neighbors, particularly when it comes to dining. But the old stereotypes about the county’s restaurant scene — that it’s all white-tablecloth Italian restaurants, pizza joints, and delis — started changing years ago as trends spread north from the hottest NYC restaurants and chefs found a new audience appreciating their creativity.

Fine-dining restaurants helmed by big-name New York City chefs — Dale Talde’s Goosefeather and Jean-George Vongerichten’s The Inn at Pound Ridge to name a few — inhabit restored historic buildings. Menus take advantage of the region’s agricultural bounty. Chefs and restaurateurs embrace their heritage, serving regional Chinese cuisine, farm-driven Mexican cooking, and the fragrant flavors of India. And multi-generational families continue the traditions of their decades-old family businesses. Of course, there’s still great pizza, but the 15 restaurants below also represent how far the county’s dining scene has come and set the stage for its continued evolution.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Purdy's Farmer and the Fish

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When Chef Mike Kaphan says he likes to keep things as local as possible, he often means the restaurant’s backyard. Purdy’s Farmer & the Fish is housed in an American Revolution-era building surrounded by four acres of terraced farms and greenhouses. From August to October, according to Kaphan, the farm produces more than 90 percent of all produce served in the restaurant, which is paired with fresh seafood, like Maine lobster, Nova Scotia halibut, and littleneck clams. When the weather’s nice, the best seats in the house are on the flower-encircled front porch, where diners can dig into several varieties of East Coast oysters and lobster rolls.

A white farmhouse with people eating outside on a wraparound porch on a sunny day.
Dining outside at Purdy’s Farmer and the Fish.
Purdy’s Farmer and the Fish

Fin & Brew

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Scott Vaccaro, founder of Captain Lawrence Brewing Co. (Westchester’s oldest and largest craft brewery), partnered with prominent Peekskill restaurateurs Louie Lanza and John Sharp to develop Factoria at Charles Point, a dining and entertainment complex on the Hudson River. On the second floor sits Fin & Brew, where chef Mike Anastacio creates seafood-driven dishes, like harissa-spiked fisherman’s stew and charred octopus with smoked pear broth, persimmon puree, and bitter greens, to pair with craft beers, particularly those on draft from Vaccaro’s River Outpost Brewing Co. downstairs, which runs tap lines directly to the Fin & Brew bar. 

A spread of dishes loaded with food interspersed with a pint of beer set on a wooden table.
Food and beer at Fin & Brew.
Fin & Brew

The Inn at Pound Ridge by Jean-Georges

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Of the big-name New York City chefs who’ve made the journey north, few have had the longevity of Jean-Georges Vongerichten, who opened  the Inn at Pound Ridge in 2014. Set in an 1833 farmhouse, the restaurant’s rustic-elegant dining room (exposed wood ceilings and four working fireplaces) is a favorite of residents in ritzy northern Westchester.. While the aesthetic is wholly different from Vongerichten’s sleek urban restaurants, the cuisine feels familiar — ginger-marinated tuna tartare, black truffle and fontina pizza, steamed black sea bass with orange and cumin — if a bit more relaxed.

Little Kabab Station

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Despite its tiny size, Little Kabab Station commands a big following. (Locals like Martha Stewart and Bill Clinton have been spotted at this neighborhood spot.) Chef Bonnie Saran, who built out the space herself, layers the rich spices of her native India throughout the menu, which includes curries, biryani, kababs, and her signature frankie rolls, tender griddled bread wrapped around mild chicken tikka, minced lamb, aloo channa, or other fillings with spiced onions and mint chutney. Equally as impressive as the flavors are the prices; nearly everything on the menu is $15 or less. 

Crabtree's Kittle House Restaurant & Inn

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Housed in a 1790s barn-turned-manor house, Crabtree’s Kittle House is a fine-dining institution known for its romantic atmosphere and wine list featuring 40,000 bottles. But what few diners here realize is that the Crabtree family was also at the forefront of the local farm-to-table movement, well before it was a marketing buzzword for restaurants. These days, the menu is still peppered with local ingredients, like Chaseholm Farm cheese and Highland Farm venison, many of which come from small, New York State farms. Don’t skip dessert: The Kittle Krack pie is a decadent amalgam of butter cookie crust and sugary filling, topped with a scoop of coconut gelato. 

A sunny dining room with tables covered in long white tablecloths and dark wooden chairs.
The dining room at Crabtree’s Kittle House.
Crabtree’s Kittle House

Mariachi Mexico

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As the second-generation co-owner of her family’s Mexican restaurant, Joana Herrera is reclaiming the authentic cuisine of her grandmother’s kitchen. Hand-pressed tortillas, made with fresh masa from Yonkers nixtamal La Milpa de Rosa, seasonal ingredients from local farmers markets, and molcajete-pounded salsas are the backbone of dishes like the quesadilla plazera with farm greens and Oaxaca cheese and the brothy, tomatillo-based sopa de tortilla. The bar program is centered around mezcal, with a short number of signature cocktails, plus some local craft beers.

A taco laid out flat on a plate with green garnishes.
A taco from Mariachi Mexico.
Mariachi Mexico

Goosefeather

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At Goosefeather, Top Chef’s Dale Talde translates the flavors and dishes of Hong Kong through a seasonal, Hudson Valley lens. Unexpected ingredients and preparations are peppered throughout the menu: dry-aged beef potstickers with sharp Chinese mustard, kung pao chicken wings, wild mushroom slippery noodles with shaved hazelnuts and snap peas, and chili-flecked Impossible Meat dan dan noodles. The space is equally as surprising with modern design elements, like a portrait of Bruce Lee, hanging in one room. Talde and team have kept much of the circa-1840 King Mansion’s original character, including the knotted wood floors, doors, and mantles while incorporating modern tropical upholstery on the banquettes and replica Miró murals on the ceilings.

A cooked lobster stuffed into a white bowl with a pint of beer nearby.
Lobster from Goosefeather.
All Good NYC/Goosefeather

The Restaurant at Kanopi

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The Restaurant at Kanopi opened on the 42nd floor of what’s now the Opus Westchester hotel in March 2020, just weeks before the pandemic shutdown. The restaurant reopened in July 2021 with only seven tables and one of the county’s most unique dining experiences — its sky-high views has no rivals in the area. Through the floor-to-ceiling glass windows, diners have sweeping views in all directions, and chef Anthony Gonçalves seeks to make an equally bold impression with his Portuguese omakase. Start with a vegetal cocktail, like a honeynut squash Old Fashioned, then tuck into dishes such as piri piri-seasoned hamachi ceviche and cheese tortellini with a lemon-dashi cacio e pepe sauce.

Floor to ceiling windows showing a sweeping view of the city with a white tableclothed table and chairs in the foreground.
The view from the dining room at Kanopi.
Kanopi

O Mandarin

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From the strip-mall parking lot, O Mandarin looks like the average Chinese restaurant. But entering the restaurant feels like a passage into owner Peter Liu’s native China, with intricately carved screens and Chinese antiques. Chef and two-time James Beard semifinalist Eric Gao specializes in Sichuan cuisine (expect lots of mouth-numbing peppercorns across the menu) and dishes that aren’t found on Chinese American menus, like silky thousand layer tofu, Sichuan hot pot, beef tendon, and a Peking duck that requires a three-to-four day process of air drying and roasting with malt sugar before being tucked into handmade pancakes.

An artfully spooled serving of noodles placed in a red sauce in a blue ceramic bowl.
A noodle dish from O Mandarin.
O Mandarin

The Cookery

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David DiBari owns a number of establishments, but his Italian gastropub remains his best restaurant, and loyal customers pack the space on weekends. The airy meatballs, brown butter-bathed cauliflower ravioli, and deep-fried pork osso buco are musts for first-timers but don’t overlook the specials, where DiBari and executive chef Sajin Renae play with offal and seasonal ingredients. The suckling pig dinner, which must be booked in advance, is one of Westchester’s iconic dining experiences. A whole, crispy-skinned pig is paraded through the dining room and carved tableside, often at DiBari’s grandmother’s kitchen table, which now sits in a nook by the front window.

A bone-in serving of pork garnished and laid on a round, white plate.
Pork osso buco from the Cookery.
The Cookery

Sonora Restaurant

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Colombian-born chef Rafael Palomino explores the cuisine of predominantly Spanish-speaking countries at Sonora. Each dish is identified by the cuisine it represents on the menu, like Peruvian quinoa empanadas, Cuban churrasco, Argentinian braised short ribs, and the restaurant’s signature Spanish paella loaded with seafood and chorizo. Sonora has also expanded its vegan small plates recently and expanded its bar program to include more than 25 tequilas and mezcals (though it’s hard to beat the mojitos, which come in six flavors, including mango, passionfruit, and black cherry).

A black, round dish filled with yellow rice and seafood, with a lemon wedge on the side.
Paella from Sonora.
Sonora

Boro6 Wine Bar

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When Jennifer Aaronson, an editorial director at Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, and Danny Meyer alum Paul Molakides, who worked front of house, opened this chic wine bar in 2016, the menu comprised mostly of cheese and charcuterie boards, salads, toasts, and 30-plus wines by the glass. But 2020 was a transformational year for Boro6. After expanding into an adjacent space to add a full kitchen and the takeaway B6 Kitchen, the wine bar now has a full menu of shareable plates and entrees. The wine list has also been reimagined to feature mostly biodynamic, sustainable, and organic wines with a growing number of selections from women winemakers.

Wine glasses and small plates filled with food scattered on a white tabletop.
A spread of dishes at Boro6.
Linda Pugliese/Boro6

Burrata

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Burrata is a hidden gem among Westchester’s countless Italian restaurants. Neapolitan-style pizzas are slow-fermented for 48 to 72 hours and fired in the wood-burning oven. (The J. Sexton, topped with chilled burrata, and the namesake wild mushroom pie are both standouts.) And the rest of the menu is equally well-executed, from the tender, balsamic glazed ribs to the fresh pastas. There’s also a solid craft cocktail program and a newly updated wine list that features reserve bottles at low markups. 

Walter's Hot Dogs

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During the summer, lines snake down the block in front of this 103-year-old Mamaroneck institution. The roadside dragon pagoda, with its oxidized copper roof and hanging lanterns, is on the National Register of Historic Places, but it’s the hot dogs that have put Walter’s on the map. Composed from a proprietary blend of beef, pork, and veal, the franks are split and griddled with butter sauce, then sandwiched between toasted buns, ideally with a smear of Walter’s own relish-flecked mustard. The only seating is a series of picnic tables (for indoor seating, a White Plains storefront opened in 2018), but that’s part of the charm.

A hot dog with onion rings and a serving cup of ketchup on the side.
A hot dog with grilled potato patties from Walter’s Hot Dogs.
Walter’s Hot Dogs

Johnny's Pizzeria

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Opened by the Piscopo family in 1942, this classic, cash-only New York pizza joint continues to be run by the family 80 years later. The wood-paneled front dining room, plastered with decades of Yankees memorabilia, looks as if it hasn’t changed in years — and that’s precisely the way Johnny’s customers, many of whom have been coming to the pizzeria for generations, like it. Behind the counter, rounds of dough are stretched into impossibly thin pies shingled with cheese, followed by spoonfuls of sauce and a drizzle of oil. The charred pies are so crisp that slices don’t flop, and true acolytes know the only way to eat one is straight from the oven at the pizzeria.

A whole pizza pie with tomato sauce on a metal platter.
Pizza from Johnny’s.
Johnny’s Pizzeria

Purdy's Farmer and the Fish

A white farmhouse with people eating outside on a wraparound porch on a sunny day.
Dining outside at Purdy’s Farmer and the Fish.
Purdy’s Farmer and the Fish

When Chef Mike Kaphan says he likes to keep things as local as possible, he often means the restaurant’s backyard. Purdy’s Farmer & the Fish is housed in an American Revolution-era building surrounded by four acres of terraced farms and greenhouses. From August to October, according to Kaphan, the farm produces more than 90 percent of all produce served in the restaurant, which is paired with fresh seafood, like Maine lobster, Nova Scotia halibut, and littleneck clams. When the weather’s nice, the best seats in the house are on the flower-encircled front porch, where diners can dig into several varieties of East Coast oysters and lobster rolls.

A white farmhouse with people eating outside on a wraparound porch on a sunny day.
Dining outside at Purdy’s Farmer and the Fish.
Purdy’s Farmer and the Fish

Fin & Brew

A spread of dishes loaded with food interspersed with a pint of beer set on a wooden table.
Food and beer at Fin & Brew.
Fin & Brew

Scott Vaccaro, founder of Captain Lawrence Brewing Co. (Westchester’s oldest and largest craft brewery), partnered with prominent Peekskill restaurateurs Louie Lanza and John Sharp to develop Factoria at Charles Point, a dining and entertainment complex on the Hudson River. On the second floor sits Fin & Brew, where chef Mike Anastacio creates seafood-driven dishes, like harissa-spiked fisherman’s stew and charred octopus with smoked pear broth, persimmon puree, and bitter greens, to pair with craft beers, particularly those on draft from Vaccaro’s River Outpost Brewing Co. downstairs, which runs tap lines directly to the Fin & Brew bar. 

A spread of dishes loaded with food interspersed with a pint of beer set on a wooden table.
Food and beer at Fin & Brew.
Fin & Brew

The Inn at Pound Ridge by Jean-Georges

Of the big-name New York City chefs who’ve made the journey north, few have had the longevity of Jean-Georges Vongerichten, who opened  the Inn at Pound Ridge in 2014. Set in an 1833 farmhouse, the restaurant’s rustic-elegant dining room (exposed wood ceilings and four working fireplaces) is a favorite of residents in ritzy northern Westchester.. While the aesthetic is wholly different from Vongerichten’s sleek urban restaurants, the cuisine feels familiar — ginger-marinated tuna tartare, black truffle and fontina pizza, steamed black sea bass with orange and cumin — if a bit more relaxed.

Little Kabab Station

Despite its tiny size, Little Kabab Station commands a big following. (Locals like Martha Stewart and Bill Clinton have been spotted at this neighborhood spot.) Chef Bonnie Saran, who built out the space herself, layers the rich spices of her native India throughout the menu, which includes curries, biryani, kababs, and her signature frankie rolls, tender griddled bread wrapped around mild chicken tikka, minced lamb, aloo channa, or other fillings with spiced onions and mint chutney. Equally as impressive as the flavors are the prices; nearly everything on the menu is $15 or less. 

Crabtree's Kittle House Restaurant & Inn

A sunny dining room with tables covered in long white tablecloths and dark wooden chairs.
The dining room at Crabtree’s Kittle House.
Crabtree’s Kittle House

Housed in a 1790s barn-turned-manor house, Crabtree’s Kittle House is a fine-dining institution known for its romantic atmosphere and wine list featuring 40,000 bottles. But what few diners here realize is that the Crabtree family was also at the forefront of the local farm-to-table movement, well before it was a marketing buzzword for restaurants. These days, the menu is still peppered with local ingredients, like Chaseholm Farm cheese and Highland Farm venison, many of which come from small, New York State farms. Don’t skip dessert: The Kittle Krack pie is a decadent amalgam of butter cookie crust and sugary filling, topped with a scoop of coconut gelato. 

A sunny dining room with tables covered in long white tablecloths and dark wooden chairs.
The dining room at Crabtree’s Kittle House.
Crabtree’s Kittle House

Mariachi Mexico

A taco laid out flat on a plate with green garnishes.
A taco from Mariachi Mexico.
Mariachi Mexico

As the second-generation co-owner of her family’s Mexican restaurant, Joana Herrera is reclaiming the authentic cuisine of her grandmother’s kitchen. Hand-pressed tortillas, made with fresh masa from Yonkers nixtamal La Milpa de Rosa, seasonal ingredients from local farmers markets, and molcajete-pounded salsas are the backbone of dishes like the quesadilla plazera with farm greens and Oaxaca cheese and the brothy, tomatillo-based sopa de tortilla. The bar program is centered around mezcal, with a short number of signature cocktails, plus some local craft beers.

A taco laid out flat on a plate with green garnishes.
A taco from Mariachi Mexico.
Mariachi Mexico

Goosefeather

A cooked lobster stuffed into a white bowl with a pint of beer nearby.
Lobster from Goosefeather.
All Good NYC/Goosefeather

At Goosefeather, Top Chef’s Dale Talde translates the flavors and dishes of Hong Kong through a seasonal, Hudson Valley lens. Unexpected ingredients and preparations are peppered throughout the menu: dry-aged beef potstickers with sharp Chinese mustard, kung pao chicken wings, wild mushroom slippery noodles with shaved hazelnuts and snap peas, and chili-flecked Impossible Meat dan dan noodles. The space is equally as surprising with modern design elements, like a portrait of Bruce Lee, hanging in one room. Talde and team have kept much of the circa-1840 King Mansion’s original character, including the knotted wood floors, doors, and mantles while incorporating modern tropical upholstery on the banquettes and replica Miró murals on the ceilings.

A cooked lobster stuffed into a white bowl with a pint of beer nearby.
Lobster from Goosefeather.
All Good NYC/Goosefeather

The Restaurant at Kanopi

Floor to ceiling windows showing a sweeping view of the city with a white tableclothed table and chairs in the foreground.
The view from the dining room at Kanopi.
Kanopi

The Restaurant at Kanopi opened on the 42nd floor of what’s now the Opus Westchester hotel in March 2020, just weeks before the pandemic shutdown. The restaurant reopened in July 2021 with only seven tables and one of the county’s most unique dining experiences — its sky-high views has no rivals in the area. Through the floor-to-ceiling glass windows, diners have sweeping views in all directions, and chef Anthony Gonçalves seeks to make an equally bold impression with his Portuguese omakase. Start with a vegetal cocktail, like a honeynut squash Old Fashioned, then tuck into dishes such as piri piri-seasoned hamachi ceviche and cheese tortellini with a lemon-dashi cacio e pepe sauce.

Floor to ceiling windows showing a sweeping view of the city with a white tableclothed table and chairs in the foreground.
The view from the dining room at Kanopi.
Kanopi

O Mandarin

An artfully spooled serving of noodles placed in a red sauce in a blue ceramic bowl.
A noodle dish from O Mandarin.
O Mandarin

From the strip-mall parking lot, O Mandarin looks like the average Chinese restaurant. But entering the restaurant feels like a passage into owner Peter Liu’s native China, with intricately carved screens and Chinese antiques. Chef and two-time James Beard semifinalist Eric Gao specializes in Sichuan cuisine (expect lots of mouth-numbing peppercorns across the menu) and dishes that aren’t found on Chinese American menus, like silky thousand layer tofu, Sichuan hot pot, beef tendon, and a Peking duck that requires a three-to-four day process of air drying and roasting with malt sugar before being tucked into handmade pancakes.

An artfully spooled serving of noodles placed in a red sauce in a blue ceramic bowl.
A noodle dish from O Mandarin.
O Mandarin

The Cookery

A bone-in serving of pork garnished and laid on a round, white plate.
Pork osso buco from the Cookery.
The Cookery

David DiBari owns a number of establishments, but his Italian gastropub remains his best restaurant, and loyal customers pack the space on weekends. The airy meatballs, brown butter-bathed cauliflower ravioli, and deep-fried pork osso buco are musts for first-timers but don’t overlook the specials, where DiBari and executive chef Sajin Renae play with offal and seasonal ingredients. The suckling pig dinner, which must be booked in advance, is one of Westchester’s iconic dining experiences. A whole, crispy-skinned pig is paraded through the dining room and carved tableside, often at DiBari’s grandmother’s kitchen table, which now sits in a nook by the front window.

A bone-in serving of pork garnished and laid on a round, white plate.
Pork osso buco from the Cookery.
The Cookery

Sonora Restaurant

A black, round dish filled with yellow rice and seafood, with a lemon wedge on the side.
Paella from Sonora.
Sonora

Colombian-born chef Rafael Palomino explores the cuisine of predominantly Spanish-speaking countries at Sonora. Each dish is identified by the cuisine it represents on the menu, like Peruvian quinoa empanadas, Cuban churrasco, Argentinian braised short ribs, and the restaurant’s signature Spanish paella loaded with seafood and chorizo. Sonora has also expanded its vegan small plates recently and expanded its bar program to include more than 25 tequilas and mezcals (though it’s hard to beat the mojitos, which come in six flavors, including mango, passionfruit, and black cherry).

A black, round dish filled with yellow rice and seafood, with a lemon wedge on the side.
Paella from Sonora.
Sonora

Boro6 Wine Bar

Wine glasses and small plates filled with food scattered on a white tabletop.
A spread of dishes at Boro6.
Linda Pugliese/Boro6

When Jennifer Aaronson, an editorial director at Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, and Danny Meyer alum Paul Molakides, who worked front of house, opened this chic wine bar in 2016, the menu comprised mostly of cheese and charcuterie boards, salads, toasts, and 30-plus wines by the glass. But 2020 was a transformational year for Boro6. After expanding into an adjacent space to add a full kitchen and the takeaway B6 Kitchen, the wine bar now has a full menu of shareable plates and entrees. The wine list has also been reimagined to feature mostly biodynamic, sustainable, and organic wines with a growing number of selections from women winemakers.

Wine glasses and small plates filled with food scattered on a white tabletop.
A spread of dishes at Boro6.
Linda Pugliese/Boro6

Burrata

Burrata is a hidden gem among Westchester’s countless Italian restaurants. Neapolitan-style pizzas are slow-fermented for 48 to 72 hours and fired in the wood-burning oven. (The J. Sexton, topped with chilled burrata, and the namesake wild mushroom pie are both standouts.) And the rest of the menu is equally well-executed, from the tender, balsamic glazed ribs to the fresh pastas. There’s also a solid craft cocktail program and a newly updated wine list that features reserve bottles at low markups. 

Walter's Hot Dogs

A hot dog with onion rings and a serving cup of ketchup on the side.
A hot dog with grilled potato patties from Walter’s Hot Dogs.
Walter’s Hot Dogs

During the summer, lines snake down the block in front of this 103-year-old Mamaroneck institution. The roadside dragon pagoda, with its oxidized copper roof and hanging lanterns, is on the National Register of Historic Places, but it’s the hot dogs that have put Walter’s on the map. Composed from a proprietary blend of beef, pork, and veal, the franks are split and griddled with butter sauce, then sandwiched between toasted buns, ideally with a smear of Walter’s own relish-flecked mustard. The only seating is a series of picnic tables (for indoor seating, a White Plains storefront opened in 2018), but that’s part of the charm.

A hot dog with onion rings and a serving cup of ketchup on the side.
A hot dog with grilled potato patties from Walter’s Hot Dogs.
Walter’s Hot Dogs

Johnny's Pizzeria

A whole pizza pie with tomato sauce on a metal platter.
Pizza from Johnny’s.
Johnny’s Pizzeria

Opened by the Piscopo family in 1942, this classic, cash-only New York pizza joint continues to be run by the family 80 years later. The wood-paneled front dining room, plastered with decades of Yankees memorabilia, looks as if it hasn’t changed in years — and that’s precisely the way Johnny’s customers, many of whom have been coming to the pizzeria for generations, like it. Behind the counter, rounds of dough are stretched into impossibly thin pies shingled with cheese, followed by spoonfuls of sauce and a drizzle of oil. The charred pies are so crisp that slices don’t flop, and true acolytes know the only way to eat one is straight from the oven at the pizzeria.

A whole pizza pie with tomato sauce on a metal platter.
Pizza from Johnny’s.
Johnny’s Pizzeria

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