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A spread of Shanghainese dishes, including whole fish, triangles of rice balls, lobster tail, quail, and a large mantou bun.
A spread of Shanghainese dishes at CheLi.
CheLi

Where to Celebrate Lunar New Year in NYC

12 restaurants to ring in the Year of the Tiger with dumplings, noodles, Asian pastries, and more

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A spread of Shanghainese dishes at CheLi.
| CheLi

The Lunar New Year is celebrated across a number of Asian cultures, each with its own traditions, but the one common theme is the significant role of food and all its symbolism. Dumplings bring wealth. Noodles represent longevity and happiness. Fish is eaten to increase prosperity.

In New York City, there are countless ways to ring in the Year of Tiger, which commences on February 1 this year. From one of the city’s many Chinatowns to neighborhoods filled with trendy spots, there are restaurants offering special menus — including vegan noodles and Peking duck — and longtime favorites that help keep the two-week long celebration feel like a never-ending feast.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Bánh Vietnamese Shop House x Bánh by Lauren

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942 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10025
(917) 639-3151
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Pastry chef Lauren Tran’s Vietnamese desserts have been one of the brighter moments of the pandemic. Many of her not-too-sweet pastries include pandan, the soft vanilla-scented leaves that impart an electric green hue to her popular chiffon cake and honeycomb-like bánh bo. The former Gramercy Tavern chef is setting up shop at Bánh Vietnamese Shop House from January 28 to 30 to sell dessert boxes that serve at least two people ($250) for Tết, what Vietnamese people call the Lunar New Year.

Three slices of bright green banh bo, a Vietnamese dessert, on a ceramic plate.
Bánh bo from Bánh by Lauren.
Charlotte Pollinger/Bánh by Lauren
434 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10024
(917) 261-5926
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Chef and owner Salil Mehta’s street food menu spanning Southeast Asian favorites — Penang fish, roti canai, and stir fried rice noodles are just a few — get a special cocktail pairing this year. Head bartender Colin Stevens has concocted a potent Year of the Tiger cocktail ($16) with baiju, jasmine tea, Sichuan peppers, blood orange, and cardamom.

A rocks glass with an orange color cocktail with a baiju with Chinese New Year decorations.
A Year of the Tiger cocktail at Wau.
Wau

3. Hutong New York

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731 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 758-4800
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Midtown doesn’t top the list of neighborhoods for NYC’s best Chinese food, but then again, Hutong isn’t the average restaurant. Eater critic Robert Sietsema found the Hong Kong import serves on-point dumplings in a dining room “that could be a spaceship.” The pricey menu items also includes a flaming Pecking duck, prawn rolls that look like art pieces, and crispy pork mochi dumplings.

An array of colorful dumplings in a bamboo basket.
An array of dumplings at Hutong.
Tanya Blum/Hutong

4. CheLi

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133-42 39th Ave STE 102
Queens, NY 11354
(917) 285-2555
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Shanghainese fare entered the spotlight when CheLi opened in the East Village, and as Eater critic Robert Sietsema noted, the restaurant takes a spirited look at the cosmopolitan city’s food that extends far beyond soup dumplings. Diners can feast on vinegar-drenched drunken crab, tea-soaked rice topped with uni, and other elaborate dishes at the new Flushing location, which is much easier to get into than the packed Manhattan location.

A spread of Shanghainese dishes, including whole fish, triangles of rice balls, lobster tail, quail, and a large mantou bun.
A spread of Shanghainese dishes at CheLi.
CheLi

5. Milu

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333 Park Ave S
New York, NY 10010
(212) 377-6403
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Milu is a crowd favorite at team Eater. Chef Connie Chung and team serve Chinese food in a fast-casual format that doesn’t make diners feel like they’re cows being herded from from the order counter and out the door. This year, a set takeout-only menu serving two people ($168) include Milu’s Everything Spice short ribs, sesame noodles, blood orange buns, and long beans with chili, garlic, and Meyer lemon. Pickup is available on February 1 and 2.

Pineapple buns, Yunnan brisket, Sichuan cauliflower, wontons, Mandarin duck, and other dishes shot overhead on a white table.
A spread of dishes from Milu.
Gary He/Eater NY

6. Madame Vo

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212 E 10th St
New York, NY 10003
(917) 261-2115
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Chef Jimmy Ly of Madame Vo is partnering with Vietnamese influencer Twaydabae for the East Village restaurant’s Lucky Tiger Lunar New Year dinner on February 8 and 9. The five-course menu ($88) includes classic homestyle dishes like thit kho chung (caramelized pork belly and eggs) and mi xao Saigon (fried egg noodles with seafood). Seatings at 5:30 and 8:30 p.m. can be booked through Resy.

7. Kimika

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40 Kenmare St
New York, NY 10012
(212) 256-9280
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Kimika, a restaurant known for its Japanese-Italian menu, is offering a Lunar New Year menu from January 31 through February 6. Persimmons served with Iberico ham, tea-smoked duck, and mochi bomboloncini are just a few of the special dishes on the menu. The Nolita spot is also launching a shabu shabu (Japanese hot pot) for its outdoor patio on the first day of the holiday.

New Year’s tortellini ozoni with pink fish cakes in a bowl with some broth at Kimika.
New Year’s tortellini ozoni at Kimika.
Evan Sung/Kimika

8. Fat Choy

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250 Broome St
New York, NY 10002
(347) 778-5889
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Many noodle dishes consumed during the the Lunar New Year contain eggs as an ingredient, but at vegan favorite Fat Choy, chef Justin Lee developed a recipe that’s just as satisfying without using any animal products. His Longevity Noodles ($13) is a generous portion teeming with charred ginger, garlic, and scallions that’s blended into silken tofu. It’s then thrown in with vegetables including braised wood ear mushrooms and carrots before it’s all topped with a soy-ginger emulsion.

A paper container filled with fried noodlese with vegetables, mushrooms, and cabbage with a pair of chopsticks.
Longevity Noodles at Fat Choy.
Fat Choy

9. Pings

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22 Mott St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 602-9988
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Pings is a popular dim destination in Manhattan’s Chinatown for good reason: The plates of dumplings, rice rolls, banana-leaf wrapped sticky rice, and other delicate morsels come out piping hot and haven’t been sitting in carts that have circled a dining room for hours. It’s a great option for a weekend brunch with a group of friends, and there’s also outdoor seating.

A hand holds a plate of generously sauced Hong Kong style rice noodles at Pings.
Hong Kong-style rice noodles at Pings.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

10. Wu's Wonton King

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165 E Broadway
New York, NY 10002
(212) 477-1112
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There’s a long list of reasons to dine at Wu’s Wonton King beyond the delicious food. It’s great for groups and there’s an outdoor setup rare at many Chinatown establishments. The BYOB policy means lots of wine geeks and restaurant industry folks gather here. A table for two or 12 can feel at home here (consider the $600 king crab for larger groups).

A semi-restrained live king crab squirms on a table at Wu’s Wonton King.
Live king crab at Wu’s Wonton King.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

11. Red Hook Tavern

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329 Van Brunt St
Brooklyn, NY 11231
(917) 966-6094
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Red Hook Tavern’s executive chef Bun Cheam is used to turning out burgers and steaks at this Brooklyn hot spot. But from January 28 to 30, the Cambodian immigrant is cooking up a special menu that takes Chinese favorites as a jumping off point and includes short rib dan dan noodles, kung pao pork belly, and crispy turnip cakes.

The teak wood exterior of Red Hook Tavern, with the title of the restaurant written in gold script in the window.
The exterior of Red Hook Tavern.
Jean Schwarzwalder/Eater NY

12. Leland Eating and Drinking House

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755 Dean St
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(646) 470-7008
Visit Website

Leland Eating and Drinking House’s owner Randi Lee, who is part Chinese, is working with chef and partner Delfin Jaranilla on a Lunar New Year menu available February 2 to 6 with plenty of gluten-free as well as vegan options. Their focus on using local ingredients means diners will find dishes like tofu made from soybeans grown in upstate New York, Peking duck from Long Island that’s hang dried for two days, and almond cookies by head baker Angela Reid.

A whole fried fish with a sprinkling of spices, including red chiles, on a white plate.
Whole fried fish at Leland Eating and Drinking House.
Leland Eating and Drinking House

1. Bánh Vietnamese Shop House x Bánh by Lauren

942 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10025
Three slices of bright green banh bo, a Vietnamese dessert, on a ceramic plate.
Bánh bo from Bánh by Lauren.
Charlotte Pollinger/Bánh by Lauren

Pastry chef Lauren Tran’s Vietnamese desserts have been one of the brighter moments of the pandemic. Many of her not-too-sweet pastries include pandan, the soft vanilla-scented leaves that impart an electric green hue to her popular chiffon cake and honeycomb-like bánh bo. The former Gramercy Tavern chef is setting up shop at Bánh Vietnamese Shop House from January 28 to 30 to sell dessert boxes that serve at least two people ($250) for Tết, what Vietnamese people call the Lunar New Year.

942 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10025

2. Wau

434 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10024
A rocks glass with an orange color cocktail with a baiju with Chinese New Year decorations.
A Year of the Tiger cocktail at Wau.
Wau

Chef and owner Salil Mehta’s street food menu spanning Southeast Asian favorites — Penang fish, roti canai, and stir fried rice noodles are just a few — get a special cocktail pairing this year. Head bartender Colin Stevens has concocted a potent Year of the Tiger cocktail ($16) with baiju, jasmine tea, Sichuan peppers, blood orange, and cardamom.

434 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10024

3. Hutong New York

731 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10022
An array of colorful dumplings in a bamboo basket.
An array of dumplings at Hutong.
Tanya Blum/Hutong

Midtown doesn’t top the list of neighborhoods for NYC’s best Chinese food, but then again, Hutong isn’t the average restaurant. Eater critic Robert Sietsema found the Hong Kong import serves on-point dumplings in a dining room “that could be a spaceship.” The pricey menu items also includes a flaming Pecking duck, prawn rolls that look like art pieces, and crispy pork mochi dumplings.

731 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022

4. CheLi

133-42 39th Ave STE 102, Queens, NY 11354
A spread of Shanghainese dishes, including whole fish, triangles of rice balls, lobster tail, quail, and a large mantou bun.
A spread of Shanghainese dishes at CheLi.
CheLi

Shanghainese fare entered the spotlight when CheLi opened in the East Village, and as Eater critic Robert Sietsema noted, the restaurant takes a spirited look at the cosmopolitan city’s food that extends far beyond soup dumplings. Diners can feast on vinegar-drenched drunken crab, tea-soaked rice topped with uni, and other elaborate dishes at the new Flushing location, which is much easier to get into than the packed Manhattan location.

133-42 39th Ave STE 102
Queens, NY 11354

5. Milu

333 Park Ave S, New York, NY 10010
Pineapple buns, Yunnan brisket, Sichuan cauliflower, wontons, Mandarin duck, and other dishes shot overhead on a white table.
A spread of dishes from Milu.
Gary He/Eater NY

Milu is a crowd favorite at team Eater. Chef Connie Chung and team serve Chinese food in a fast-casual format that doesn’t make diners feel like they’re cows being herded from from the order counter and out the door. This year, a set takeout-only menu serving two people ($168) include Milu’s Everything Spice short ribs, sesame noodles, blood orange buns, and long beans with chili, garlic, and Meyer lemon. Pickup is available on February 1 and 2.

333 Park Ave S
New York, NY 10010

6. Madame Vo

212 E 10th St, New York, NY 10003

Chef Jimmy Ly of Madame Vo is partnering with Vietnamese influencer Twaydabae for the East Village restaurant’s Lucky Tiger Lunar New Year dinner on February 8 and 9. The five-course menu ($88) includes classic homestyle dishes like thit kho chung (caramelized pork belly and eggs) and mi xao Saigon (fried egg noodles with seafood). Seatings at 5:30 and 8:30 p.m. can be booked through Resy.

212 E 10th St
New York, NY 10003

7. Kimika

40 Kenmare St, New York, NY 10012
New Year’s tortellini ozoni with pink fish cakes in a bowl with some broth at Kimika.
New Year’s tortellini ozoni at Kimika.
Evan Sung/Kimika

Kimika, a restaurant known for its Japanese-Italian menu, is offering a Lunar New Year menu from January 31 through February 6. Persimmons served with Iberico ham, tea-smoked duck, and mochi bomboloncini are just a few of the special dishes on the menu. The Nolita spot is also launching a shabu shabu (Japanese hot pot) for its outdoor patio on the first day of the holiday.

40 Kenmare St
New York, NY 10012

8. Fat Choy

250 Broome St, New York, NY 10002
A paper container filled with fried noodlese with vegetables, mushrooms, and cabbage with a pair of chopsticks.
Longevity Noodles at Fat Choy.
Fat Choy

Many noodle dishes consumed during the the Lunar New Year contain eggs as an ingredient, but at vegan favorite Fat Choy, chef Justin Lee developed a recipe that’s just as satisfying without using any animal products. His Longevity Noodles ($13) is a generous portion teeming with charred ginger, garlic, and scallions that’s blended into silken tofu. It’s then thrown in with vegetables including braised wood ear mushrooms and carrots before it’s all topped with a soy-ginger emulsion.

250 Broome St
New York, NY 10002

9. Pings

22 Mott St, New York, NY 10013
A hand holds a plate of generously sauced Hong Kong style rice noodles at Pings.
Hong Kong-style rice noodles at Pings.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Pings is a popular dim destination in Manhattan’s Chinatown for good reason: The plates of dumplings, rice rolls, banana-leaf wrapped sticky rice, and other delicate morsels come out piping hot and haven’t been sitting in carts that have circled a dining room for hours. It’s a great option for a weekend brunch with a group of friends, and there’s also outdoor seating.

22 Mott St
New York, NY 10013

10. Wu's Wonton King

165 E Broadway, New York, NY 10002
A semi-restrained live king crab squirms on a table at Wu’s Wonton King.
Live king crab at Wu’s Wonton King.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

There’s a long list of reasons to dine at Wu’s Wonton King beyond the delicious food. It’s great for groups and there’s an outdoor setup rare at many Chinatown establishments. The BYOB policy means lots of wine geeks and restaurant industry folks gather here. A table for two or 12 can feel at home here (consider the $600 king crab for larger groups).

165 E Broadway
New York, NY 10002

11. Red Hook Tavern

329 Van Brunt St, Brooklyn, NY 11231
The teak wood exterior of Red Hook Tavern, with the title of the restaurant written in gold script in the window.
The exterior of Red Hook Tavern.
Jean Schwarzwalder/Eater NY

Red Hook Tavern’s executive chef Bun Cheam is used to turning out burgers and steaks at this Brooklyn hot spot. But from January 28 to 30, the Cambodian immigrant is cooking up a special menu that takes Chinese favorites as a jumping off point and includes short rib dan dan noodles, kung pao pork belly, and crispy turnip cakes.

329 Van Brunt St
Brooklyn, NY 11231

12. Leland Eating and Drinking House

755 Dean St, Brooklyn, NY 11238
A whole fried fish with a sprinkling of spices, including red chiles, on a white plate.
Whole fried fish at Leland Eating and Drinking House.
Leland Eating and Drinking House

Leland Eating and Drinking House’s owner Randi Lee, who is part Chinese, is working with chef and partner Delfin Jaranilla on a Lunar New Year menu available February 2 to 6 with plenty of gluten-free as well as vegan options. Their focus on using local ingredients means diners will find dishes like tofu made from soybeans grown in upstate New York, Peking duck from Long Island that’s hang dried for two days, and almond cookies by head baker Angela Reid.

755 Dean St
Brooklyn, NY 11238

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