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Flowers and assorted mooncakes sit atop a napkin with black swirls.
Assorted mooncakes from Kitsby.
Kitsby Dessert Bar

Where to Find Magnificent Mooncakes for Mid-Autumn Festival in NYC

From the traditional to the inventive, fillings include lotus seed paste, brown buttered corn, and mung bean with pork

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Assorted mooncakes from Kitsby.
| Kitsby Dessert Bar

The end of the autumn harvest has arrived. It’s celebrated as the Mid-Autumn Festival in China, Chuseok in Korea, Tsukimi in Japan, and Tet Trung Thu in Vietnam. It’s believed that the moon shines the brightest and appears the fullest on this holiday, which falls on the 15th day of the eighth month of the lunar calendar. This year, it’s Saturday, September 10.

In homage to the celestial body, mooncakes are traditionally eaten and gifted among friends and families — only after bakers have sweat it out in the kitchen to make this labor-intensive treat. The classic Chinese lotus seed mooncake, for instance, requires a multi-step process: cooking the lotus seed paste (which in and of itself involves soaking and de-stemming lotus seeds, blending, and cooking them down to a dense paste), wrapping it in a thick layer of dough, and imprinting the mooncakes using gorgeously patterned molds. But it’s still not over. The mooncakes have to age so that the oils in both the wrapper and filling spread out uniformly while the pressed design and soft consistency of the paste remains intact, says Mogan Anthony, co-owner of pastry shop Lady Wong in the East Village.

Below, find 12 New York bakeries doling out mooncakes — from the traditional to the inventive — this year.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Bibble & Sip

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Founder Gary Chan’s upscale bakery often features colorful animal shapes, and he’s not disappointing his fans this Mid-Autumn Festival. Each box ($78) contains nine whimsical mooncakes. Assorted fillings include matcha-infused roasted sweet potato and black sesame walnut that’s molded into the shape of a green lion; sweet potato milk tea and brown sugar mochi formed into a black cat; and vanilla sweet potato custard with salted egg cream. Place an order via email ⁣⁣to info.bibbleandsip@gmail.com with a pick-up time.

Fingers hold a green lion-shaped pastry.
The green lion mooncake from Bibble & Sip.
Bibble & Sip

Taipan Bakery

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Taipan Bakery offers the rare-in-New-York Hong Kong-style snow skin mooncake that’s similar to mochi ice cream: Cold glutinous rice wrapper surrounds white lotus seed, green tea, and black bean pastes. The bakery opened in 1990 with birthday and wedding cakes, and expanded with mooncakes and everyday pastries at both Flushing and Chinatown branches. 

A yellow mooncake sits atop a golden case.
A single mooncake from Taipan Bakery.
Taipan Bakery

Mr. Tu Bakery Inc

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Mr. Tu has been churning out classics like taro buns, lemon rolls, and sponge cakes for more than ten years. For the holiday, the mooncakes come in 17 flavors like pineapple cake, taro, red bean, and green tea in a box of 12 or singles for around $3 each, an employee tells Eater.

Minamoto Kitchoan

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When Tokyo-based K. Minamoto isn’t cultivating Muscat of Alexandria grapes at its own farm in Japan, it’s concocting confectionary arts like a single cherry in clear jello. For the holiday, it’s extending its artistic touch to its Japanese-style mooncakes. A large gift box contains two kinds of mooncakes (red bean with black sesame or white bean with chestnuts), bunny-shaped bean cakes, and apple jellies. 

Three plates containing mooncakes, bunny-shaped pastries, and an apple jelly sit on a red surface.
Mooncakes, bunny-shaped pastries, and an apple jelly from K. Minamoto.
K. Minamoto

Fay Da Bakery

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In 1991, founder Han Chou brought his baking chops in Taiwan to Manhattan, and eventually to over 10 locations from Flushing to Maspeth, where he’s fed the Chinese communities pastry favorites like curry beef puffs and sesame balls. Fay Da is now selling an exciting assortment of mooncakes: Large and mini sets include durian lava, white lotus seed and egg yolk, jujube and walnut. They can be shipped nationwide.

Four colorful mooncakes have fillings oozing out: yellow custard, orange, green matcha, and yellow durian.
The lava collection with custard, orange, matcha, and durian fillings.
Fay Da Bakery

Yeh's Bakery

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Hits at Yeh’s Bakery are its freshly whipped Boston cream pie and fluffy green tea sponge cake, but when autumn comes around, locals head there for its Taiwanese mooncakes, like mung bean paste with dried pork, and Cantonese versions filled with lotus seed, prune, red bean or pineapple pastes.

Lady Wong Pastry & Kuih

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The beautifully presented kuih, or Malaysian desserts, shot Lady Wong to fame. Now, husband-and-wife co-owners, Mogan Anthony and Seleste Tan, are cooking up snow skin mooncakes with modern, Malaysian accents. Try their pandan-infused lotus paste, fresh Musang King durian, brown buttered corn, and almond paste with house-made almond condensed milk. Anthony tells Eater the mooncakes will only be available on weekends starting September 3, and they will update patrons on the end date on Instagram.

Pale orange and green mooncakes have flower imprints on them.
Assorted snow skin mooncakes from Lady Wong.
Lady Wong

Double Crispy Bakery

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For those with a craving for egg tarts, head to Double Crispy to get ahold of their wildly popular egg tarts while also picking up mooncakes. The bakery is making red bean, lotus seed, and winter melon mooncakes until September 10, an employee tells Eater.

Congee Village

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The team behind Congee Village is baking up boxes of mooncakes ($35) — lotus seed, winter melon, pineapple, and matcha fillings — and packaging them in gift bags with lantern designs that symbolize lighting the path to good fortune. They’re available for pick-up at any of the restaurant’s three locations in Flushing and the Lower East Side.

A golden tray holds four mooncakes.
A box of mooncakes at Congee Village.
Congee Village

Go Believe

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Since 2012, this bakery has been turning locals into believers of its buns from red roast pork to red bean. It’s now making mooncake converts with its dense fillings like mixed nuts with ham and two bulbous salted egg yolks baked into the lotus paste filling. 

A cross section of a mooncake shows two egg yolks immersed in dense paste.
Double egg yolk mooncake from Go Believe.
Go Believe

Golden Fung Wong Bakery Shop

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Golden Fung Wong is the rare shop that bakes mooncakes year-round — and in more than 10 flavors including winter melon, sesame, and black bean. Its other specialty is the skill-intensive hopia, or wife cake: round flaky pastries filled with candied winter melon paste. 

Kitsby Dessert Bar

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This Williamsburg dessert bar from Taiwanese American Amy Hsiao and her partners focus on beautifully presented sweets from their childhoods. From traditional to inventive, Kitsby’s mooncake flavors include white lotus paste and black sesame shortbread. A collab with hard seltzer company Lunar yields passionfruit and yuzu flavors. Following from its origins as a baking kit vendor, Kitsby ships the mooncakes nationwide and offers them for pick-up. 

A divided box contains yellow, pink, green, and black mooncakes.
Assorted mooncake box from Kitsby.
Kitsby Dessert Bar

Bibble & Sip

Fingers hold a green lion-shaped pastry.
The green lion mooncake from Bibble & Sip.
Bibble & Sip

Founder Gary Chan’s upscale bakery often features colorful animal shapes, and he’s not disappointing his fans this Mid-Autumn Festival. Each box ($78) contains nine whimsical mooncakes. Assorted fillings include matcha-infused roasted sweet potato and black sesame walnut that’s molded into the shape of a green lion; sweet potato milk tea and brown sugar mochi formed into a black cat; and vanilla sweet potato custard with salted egg cream. Place an order via email ⁣⁣to info.bibbleandsip@gmail.com with a pick-up time.

Fingers hold a green lion-shaped pastry.
The green lion mooncake from Bibble & Sip.
Bibble & Sip

Taipan Bakery

A yellow mooncake sits atop a golden case.
A single mooncake from Taipan Bakery.
Taipan Bakery

Taipan Bakery offers the rare-in-New-York Hong Kong-style snow skin mooncake that’s similar to mochi ice cream: Cold glutinous rice wrapper surrounds white lotus seed, green tea, and black bean pastes. The bakery opened in 1990 with birthday and wedding cakes, and expanded with mooncakes and everyday pastries at both Flushing and Chinatown branches. 

A yellow mooncake sits atop a golden case.
A single mooncake from Taipan Bakery.
Taipan Bakery

Mr. Tu Bakery Inc

Mr. Tu has been churning out classics like taro buns, lemon rolls, and sponge cakes for more than ten years. For the holiday, the mooncakes come in 17 flavors like pineapple cake, taro, red bean, and green tea in a box of 12 or singles for around $3 each, an employee tells Eater.

Minamoto Kitchoan

Three plates containing mooncakes, bunny-shaped pastries, and an apple jelly sit on a red surface.
Mooncakes, bunny-shaped pastries, and an apple jelly from K. Minamoto.
K. Minamoto

When Tokyo-based K. Minamoto isn’t cultivating Muscat of Alexandria grapes at its own farm in Japan, it’s concocting confectionary arts like a single cherry in clear jello. For the holiday, it’s extending its artistic touch to its Japanese-style mooncakes. A large gift box contains two kinds of mooncakes (red bean with black sesame or white bean with chestnuts), bunny-shaped bean cakes, and apple jellies. 

Three plates containing mooncakes, bunny-shaped pastries, and an apple jelly sit on a red surface.
Mooncakes, bunny-shaped pastries, and an apple jelly from K. Minamoto.
K. Minamoto

Fay Da Bakery

Four colorful mooncakes have fillings oozing out: yellow custard, orange, green matcha, and yellow durian.
The lava collection with custard, orange, matcha, and durian fillings.
Fay Da Bakery

In 1991, founder Han Chou brought his baking chops in Taiwan to Manhattan, and eventually to over 10 locations from Flushing to Maspeth, where he’s fed the Chinese communities pastry favorites like curry beef puffs and sesame balls. Fay Da is now selling an exciting assortment of mooncakes: Large and mini sets include durian lava, white lotus seed and egg yolk, jujube and walnut. They can be shipped nationwide.

Four colorful mooncakes have fillings oozing out: yellow custard, orange, green matcha, and yellow durian.
The lava collection with custard, orange, matcha, and durian fillings.
Fay Da Bakery

Yeh's Bakery

Hits at Yeh’s Bakery are its freshly whipped Boston cream pie and fluffy green tea sponge cake, but when autumn comes around, locals head there for its Taiwanese mooncakes, like mung bean paste with dried pork, and Cantonese versions filled with lotus seed, prune, red bean or pineapple pastes.

Lady Wong Pastry & Kuih

Pale orange and green mooncakes have flower imprints on them.
Assorted snow skin mooncakes from Lady Wong.
Lady Wong

The beautifully presented kuih, or Malaysian desserts, shot Lady Wong to fame. Now, husband-and-wife co-owners, Mogan Anthony and Seleste Tan, are cooking up snow skin mooncakes with modern, Malaysian accents. Try their pandan-infused lotus paste, fresh Musang King durian, brown buttered corn, and almond paste with house-made almond condensed milk. Anthony tells Eater the mooncakes will only be available on weekends starting September 3, and they will update patrons on the end date on Instagram.

Pale orange and green mooncakes have flower imprints on them.
Assorted snow skin mooncakes from Lady Wong.
Lady Wong

Double Crispy Bakery

For those with a craving for egg tarts, head to Double Crispy to get ahold of their wildly popular egg tarts while also picking up mooncakes. The bakery is making red bean, lotus seed, and winter melon mooncakes until September 10, an employee tells Eater.

Congee Village

A golden tray holds four mooncakes.
A box of mooncakes at Congee Village.
Congee Village

The team behind Congee Village is baking up boxes of mooncakes ($35) — lotus seed, winter melon, pineapple, and matcha fillings — and packaging them in gift bags with lantern designs that symbolize lighting the path to good fortune. They’re available for pick-up at any of the restaurant’s three locations in Flushing and the Lower East Side.

A golden tray holds four mooncakes.
A box of mooncakes at Congee Village.
Congee Village

Go Believe

A cross section of a mooncake shows two egg yolks immersed in dense paste.
Double egg yolk mooncake from Go Believe.
Go Believe

Since 2012, this bakery has been turning locals into believers of its buns from red roast pork to red bean. It’s now making mooncake converts with its dense fillings like mixed nuts with ham and two bulbous salted egg yolks baked into the lotus paste filling. 

A cross section of a mooncake shows two egg yolks immersed in dense paste.
Double egg yolk mooncake from Go Believe.
Go Believe

Golden Fung Wong Bakery Shop

Golden Fung Wong is the rare shop that bakes mooncakes year-round — and in more than 10 flavors including winter melon, sesame, and black bean. Its other specialty is the skill-intensive hopia, or wife cake: round flaky pastries filled with candied winter melon paste. 

Kitsby Dessert Bar

A divided box contains yellow, pink, green, and black mooncakes.
Assorted mooncake box from Kitsby.
Kitsby Dessert Bar

This Williamsburg dessert bar from Taiwanese American Amy Hsiao and her partners focus on beautifully presented sweets from their childhoods. From traditional to inventive, Kitsby’s mooncake flavors include white lotus paste and black sesame shortbread. A collab with hard seltzer company Lunar yields passionfruit and yuzu flavors. Following from its origins as a baking kit vendor, Kitsby ships the mooncakes nationwide and offers them for pick-up. 

A divided box contains yellow, pink, green, and black mooncakes.
Assorted mooncake box from Kitsby.
Kitsby Dessert Bar

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