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Designed by Sanford White, the Washington Square Arch is the neighborhood’s most famous landmark.

Where to Get Takeout in Greenwich Village and the West Village

Eater critic Robert Sietsema lists his favorite spots that are currently open

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Designed by Sanford White, the Washington Square Arch is the neighborhood’s most famous landmark.

Nowadays, the geography is somewhat confused. What was once merely Greenwich Village has been divvied up into Greenwich Village, the West Village, and the South Village, the latter now more often considered the western part of Soho. Meanwhile, what was once the Lower East Side became the East Village, in an attempt on the part of real estate interests to make that neighborhood as desirable as Greenwich Village.

Well, this piece doesn’t have to take a stance, let’s just say it covers the territory that runs from the Hudson River to Broadway, between Houston and 14th streets. Here are some of my favorite restaurants, some well-known, others not so much. Unless otherwise noted, all these places offer outdoor seating in one form or another rather than indoor seating, which is currently prohibited in NYC due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Also be careful to check on a restaurant before you go, since opening hours and days can vary due to staffing and other coronavirus challenges.

A number of New York City restaurants have resumed outdoor dining services. However, this should not be taken as endorsement for outdoor dining, as there are still safety concerns: for updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the NYC Health Department’s website. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.

For more New York dining recommendations, check out the new hotspots in Manhattan, Brooklyn and our guide to Michelin-starred restaurants open for outdoor dining right now.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Perry St

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The newly reopened French restaurant features elegant bistro fare with Japanese and American flourishes, including the fried chicken with habanero sauce shown, at prices a bit cheaper than you might expect in a luxury restaurant. Now seating is provided along the marble terrace on the shady north side of the Richard Meyer building the restaurant occupies.

Fancy fried chicken in a yellow habanero sauce surrounded by a ring of leaves Robert Sietsema/Eater

Malatesta

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Occupying a corner space with views downhill toward the Hudson River, Malatesta is an Italian restaurant featuring the food of Emilia-Romagna. Sure there’s a spectacular rendition of Bolognese sauce, but more obscure specialties are also offered, including the flatbread called piadina, made on the premises and served warm, stuffed with agreeable things like prosciutto, arugula, and parmesan.

Flatbread stuffed with prosciutto and a salad of arugula and yellow tomatoes Robert Sietsema/Eater

The Clam

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Probably the only clam-centric restaurant in Manhattan (Brooklyn and Queens have a couple), the Clam is a great place to score raw clams, clam dip, spaghetti with clams, and a seafood chowder that, naturally, contains clams. Apart from that, there are salads, vegetable sides, and other seafood galore, plush trashy stuff like Old Bay french fries.

Four clams in their shells in a white sauce. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Cowgirl Hall of Fame

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A themed restaurant from an earlier era, Cowgirl gathers Chuckwagon, Tex-Mex, and Southern food into its pleasing menu, and the décor celebrates the Texas cowgirl from a feminist perspective. The smoked ribs are better than expected, the chicken fried steak just short of wonderful, the nachos profuse, and the black bean dip has become legendary. Parents and other caregivers have been bringing their kids here for decades.

A man sits in a white easy chair outside the restaurant. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Meme Mediterranean

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This appealing brunch spot makes a mean shakshuka, a North African dish of poached eggs in a slurry of chile-laced red sauce. The mostly Middle Eastern and Moroccan menu keeps pace, much of it representing Sephardic Jewish cooking. There are lots of small dishes on the menu, many vegetarian, and the wine, beer, and cocktails are appealingly priced.

A shallow white bowl is filled with bright red sauce and eggs, surrounded by slices of pita. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Anton's

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When Anton’s opened last autumn on the West Village’s hopping Hudson Street, it emulated New York City restaurants of a century earlier, featuring recipes from The Epicurean, an historic cookbook. The outdoor menu is now more summery than before, and apart from the restaurant’s celebrated pasta section (titled “Macaroni”), your attention might be turned to the apps and salads, with the former including a whitefish salad served with rye crisps, and the latter a colorful plate of crudite with an Italian tonnato dip, both cool and refreshing.

A round plate of crudite with brown dip in the center. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Top Thai Vintage

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This second, West Village branch of a Village Siamese restaurant offers a halal menu, which means no pork, but you won’t even miss it. Chicken larb is particularly tasty and appropriately incendiary at your request, but also consider ordering braided curry puffs; khao soi, a meal-size soup featuring two kinds of noodles; and the wonderful duck salad, with a sweet dressing. Cocktails available, in addition to Thai beer.

A fanned array of little hand pies with a braided spine and dipping sauce. Robert Sietsema/Eater

L'Accolade

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This very French restaurant has recently reopened with lots of seating out front right on Bleecker Street, but seek out the back garden for one of the chillest outdoor spaces in the city. The wine list specializes in natural wines, including more by the glass choices than usual. The food seems perfectly matched to the wine, including a stuffed eggplant roulade app that looks like tekkamaki, and a jerk cauliflower main that includes a wealth of other farmers market vegetables.

The artic char entree featured a profusion of small fresh berries and a bit of tableside preparation. Robert Sietsema/Eater

John's of Bleecker St.

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Originally known simply as John’s Pizzeria, this coal oven pizza parlor was one of a small group of venerable places to introduce pizza as we know it to the United States a century ago. The pies are thin-crusted, slightly charred, made with excellent mozzarella, and a modest strew of good ingredients (my favorites: Italian sausage and black olives), many still originating in what was once an Italian and Portuguese neighborhood, of which few vestiges remain. 

Pizza in the foreground headless diners in background. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Old Tbilisi Garden

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Yes, you can get the faddish bread boatload of melted cheese called khachapuri at OTG, but Georgian cuisine is so much more: its compressed vegetable appetizers laced with walnuts and sprinkled with pomegranate seeds, for example, or its charcoal lamb kebabs wrapped with flatbreads for convenience of eating with one’s fingers, or its mellow chicken stews or oniony lamb dumplings. The wine list is interesting enough on its own to induce a visit.

An elongated bread with cheese and a raw egg in the middle a reservoir in the center. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Mamoun's Falafel

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Mamoun’s may have been the first place to bring the falafel sandwich to New York City in 1977; it gradually became one of the city’s favorite inexpensive meals. Enjoy the falafel and the café’s quaint premises on the MacDougal Street strip just south of NYU, and ask that the gritty hot sauce be applied to your sandwich. The shawarma and Middle Eastern pastries are similarly compelling.

A styrofoam container full of delicious food from Mamoun’s Robert Sietsema/Eater

Umami Sushi

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As distinct from many of the other sushi restaurants in Greenwich Village, this tiny sushi joint won’t sell you a $200 omakase, because its deluxe assortment (10 pieces and one roll) comes in at less than $30. The fish is pristine in its freshness, and, supply permitting, less common forms of seafood are often found in its assortments. No outdoor seating to speak of. Order online.

An array of sushi including finger sushi and a sushi roll served on a wooden block. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Pommes Frites

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Nothing beats a great french fry, especially one that has been double cooked at differing temperatures and furnished with a dizzying choice of sauces. Some of the best of these sauces are free, some entail a nominal charge at Pommes Frites, which was transplanted a few years ago from a location on Second Avenue in the East Village after an explosion and fire in its row of buildings. Now the décor is more Tudor than ever, and never fear that the fries won’t make a full meal.

Two women in front of Pommes Frites Robert Sietsema/Eater

Pane Pasta

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This old-fashioned focacceria might have been transplanted from Palermo. The menu features the chickpea fritters called panelle along with fried and squished small potatoes made into a panino, as well as bombolini filled with pastry cream, pastas bearing eggplant and ricotta, and thick, square slices of focaccia, the best of which features thin-sliced potatoes and rosemary. The shop is small, but still has an outdoor seating area on 8th Street.

Rectangular pizza slice with potatoes and rosemary on top Robert Sietsema/Eater

NY Dosas

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On the southern edge of Washington Square Park at Sullivan Street this cart has been perched for nearly 20 years. The crisp Indian pancakes called dosas, with a savory potato filling, are crafted on the spot, garnished with a pair of chutneys and accompanied by a cup of sambar, a spicy vegetable soup. The combo is simple but delicious, and other meals and snacks including samosas and uttapam are available.

A white paper plate placed on a wooden bench with a dosa on it, a green cilantro sauce, a samosa, and a red sauce in a plastic cup. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Auntie Guan's Kitchen

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This restaurant on the northern frontier of Greenwich Village represents the engaging food of northern China, specifically the provinces in the northeast called Dongbei. That means glass mung bean noodles sometimes served cold and flavored with wasabi, pork stews with shredded cabbage that’s something like sauerkraut, cumin-scented lamb, and some of the best and most diversely filled dumplings in town.

Mung bean noodles with colorful toppings spread out. Robert Sietsema/Eater

South of the Clouds

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Remember the furor over the mixian rice noodles of Yunnan two years ago? Here is one of its most enthusiastic propagators, right in the middle of the Village. The name is a translation of “Yunnan,” and the famous crossing the bridge noodles is its central offering. But dig deeper into the menu for all sorts of other noodles, both dry and in soups, including my favorite, tofu pudding rice noodle.

Rice noodles at South of the Clouds Gary He/Eater

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Perry St

Fancy fried chicken in a yellow habanero sauce surrounded by a ring of leaves Robert Sietsema/Eater

The newly reopened French restaurant features elegant bistro fare with Japanese and American flourishes, including the fried chicken with habanero sauce shown, at prices a bit cheaper than you might expect in a luxury restaurant. Now seating is provided along the marble terrace on the shady north side of the Richard Meyer building the restaurant occupies.

Fancy fried chicken in a yellow habanero sauce surrounded by a ring of leaves Robert Sietsema/Eater

Malatesta

Flatbread stuffed with prosciutto and a salad of arugula and yellow tomatoes Robert Sietsema/Eater

Occupying a corner space with views downhill toward the Hudson River, Malatesta is an Italian restaurant featuring the food of Emilia-Romagna. Sure there’s a spectacular rendition of Bolognese sauce, but more obscure specialties are also offered, including the flatbread called piadina, made on the premises and served warm, stuffed with agreeable things like prosciutto, arugula, and parmesan.

Flatbread stuffed with prosciutto and a salad of arugula and yellow tomatoes Robert Sietsema/Eater

The Clam

Four clams in their shells in a white sauce. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Probably the only clam-centric restaurant in Manhattan (Brooklyn and Queens have a couple), the Clam is a great place to score raw clams, clam dip, spaghetti with clams, and a seafood chowder that, naturally, contains clams. Apart from that, there are salads, vegetable sides, and other seafood galore, plush trashy stuff like Old Bay french fries.

Four clams in their shells in a white sauce. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Cowgirl Hall of Fame

A man sits in a white easy chair outside the restaurant. Robert Sietsema/Eater

A themed restaurant from an earlier era, Cowgirl gathers Chuckwagon, Tex-Mex, and Southern food into its pleasing menu, and the décor celebrates the Texas cowgirl from a feminist perspective. The smoked ribs are better than expected, the chicken fried steak just short of wonderful, the nachos profuse, and the black bean dip has become legendary. Parents and other caregivers have been bringing their kids here for decades.

A man sits in a white easy chair outside the restaurant. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Meme Mediterranean

A shallow white bowl is filled with bright red sauce and eggs, surrounded by slices of pita. Robert Sietsema/Eater

This appealing brunch spot makes a mean shakshuka, a North African dish of poached eggs in a slurry of chile-laced red sauce. The mostly Middle Eastern and Moroccan menu keeps pace, much of it representing Sephardic Jewish cooking. There are lots of small dishes on the menu, many vegetarian, and the wine, beer, and cocktails are appealingly priced.

A shallow white bowl is filled with bright red sauce and eggs, surrounded by slices of pita. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Anton's

A round plate of crudite with brown dip in the center. Robert Sietsema/Eater

When Anton’s opened last autumn on the West Village’s hopping Hudson Street, it emulated New York City restaurants of a century earlier, featuring recipes from The Epicurean, an historic cookbook. The outdoor menu is now more summery than before, and apart from the restaurant’s celebrated pasta section (titled “Macaroni”), your attention might be turned to the apps and salads, with the former including a whitefish salad served with rye crisps, and the latter a colorful plate of crudite with an Italian tonnato dip, both cool and refreshing.

A round plate of crudite with brown dip in the center. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Top Thai Vintage

A fanned array of little hand pies with a braided spine and dipping sauce. Robert Sietsema/Eater

This second, West Village branch of a Village Siamese restaurant offers a halal menu, which means no pork, but you won’t even miss it. Chicken larb is particularly tasty and appropriately incendiary at your request, but also consider ordering braided curry puffs; khao soi, a meal-size soup featuring two kinds of noodles; and the wonderful duck salad, with a sweet dressing. Cocktails available, in addition to Thai beer.

A fanned array of little hand pies with a braided spine and dipping sauce. Robert Sietsema/Eater

L'Accolade

The artic char entree featured a profusion of small fresh berries and a bit of tableside preparation. Robert Sietsema/Eater

This very French restaurant has recently reopened with lots of seating out front right on Bleecker Street, but seek out the back garden for one of the chillest outdoor spaces in the city. The wine list specializes in natural wines, including more by the glass choices than usual. The food seems perfectly matched to the wine, including a stuffed eggplant roulade app that looks like tekkamaki, and a jerk cauliflower main that includes a wealth of other farmers market vegetables.

The artic char entree featured a profusion of small fresh berries and a bit of tableside preparation. Robert Sietsema/Eater

John's of Bleecker St.

Pizza in the foreground headless diners in background. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Originally known simply as John’s Pizzeria, this coal oven pizza parlor was one of a small group of venerable places to introduce pizza as we know it to the United States a century ago. The pies are thin-crusted, slightly charred, made with excellent mozzarella, and a modest strew of good ingredients (my favorites: Italian sausage and black olives), many still originating in what was once an Italian and Portuguese neighborhood, of which few vestiges remain. 

Pizza in the foreground headless diners in background. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Old Tbilisi Garden

An elongated bread with cheese and a raw egg in the middle a reservoir in the center. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Yes, you can get the faddish bread boatload of melted cheese called khachapuri at OTG, but Georgian cuisine is so much more: its compressed vegetable appetizers laced with walnuts and sprinkled with pomegranate seeds, for example, or its charcoal lamb kebabs wrapped with flatbreads for convenience of eating with one’s fingers, or its mellow chicken stews or oniony lamb dumplings. The wine list is interesting enough on its own to induce a visit.

An elongated bread with cheese and a raw egg in the middle a reservoir in the center. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Mamoun's Falafel

A styrofoam container full of delicious food from Mamoun’s Robert Sietsema/Eater

Mamoun’s may have been the first place to bring the falafel sandwich to New York City in 1977; it gradually became one of the city’s favorite inexpensive meals. Enjoy the falafel and the café’s quaint premises on the MacDougal Street strip just south of NYU, and ask that the gritty hot sauce be applied to your sandwich. The shawarma and Middle Eastern pastries are similarly compelling.

A styrofoam container full of delicious food from Mamoun’s Robert Sietsema/Eater

Umami Sushi

An array of sushi including finger sushi and a sushi roll served on a wooden block. Robert Sietsema/Eater

As distinct from many of the other sushi restaurants in Greenwich Village, this tiny sushi joint won’t sell you a $200 omakase, because its deluxe assortment (10 pieces and one roll) comes in at less than $30. The fish is pristine in its freshness, and, supply permitting, less common forms of seafood are often found in its assortments. No outdoor seating to speak of. Order online.

An array of sushi including finger sushi and a sushi roll served on a wooden block. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Pommes Frites

Two women in front of Pommes Frites Robert Sietsema/Eater

Nothing beats a great french fry, especially one that has been double cooked at differing temperatures and furnished with a dizzying choice of sauces. Some of the best of these sauces are free, some entail a nominal charge at Pommes Frites, which was transplanted a few years ago from a location on Second Avenue in the East Village after an explosion and fire in its row of buildings. Now the décor is more Tudor than ever, and never fear that the fries won’t make a full meal.