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An exterior view of Jimmy’s Corner during the coronavirus pandemic on May 13, 2020 in New York City.
Jimmy’s Corner.
Noam Galai/Getty Images

21 Tried-and-True Dive Bars in NYC

Grimy, lovable spaces with well-worn seats and solid beers

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Jimmy’s Corner.
| Noam Galai/Getty Images

Referring to dive bars as "best" or superior to others is somewhat tricky, since none of the places on this map are vying for the title — as doing so would render it not a dive. So here is a broad list of some of Eater's favorite dives around New York and what makes them special.

These 21 bars are downright grungy, somewhat lovable, and absolutely solid, where a beer under $6 is the norm and ordering food is not. Prepare for sticky floors, tagged bathrooms, and gallons of cheap booze. None of them look good with the lights on, but all are a fun time.

For this update, we’ve added Horseshoe Bar, Cherry Tavern, and Sharlene’s.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

The Punch Bowl

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The location has been occupied by bars since New York City’s pre-Prohibition Era. It’s the kind of place to grab a seat and settle in for hours.

Glacken's Bar & Grill

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Glacken’s is nothing if not reliable: It has been pouring beer in the neighborhood since 1940 and hasn’t slowed down for, give or take, 80 years. Doesn’t hurt that it’s within walking distance of Yankee Stadium, too.

Reif's Bar

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Open since 1942, Reif’s is a neighborhood bar with a friendly staff, where patrons all seem to know each other. PBRs are always flowing, whether inside or on the bar’s outdoor patio.

Paradise Alley

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Paradise Alley is ideal for those hunting for a comfortable, neighborhood spot to watch a game with friends and a bucket of beer. There’s a pool table, a jukebox, and outdoor space to hang in the warm weather.

Rudy's Bar & Grill

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This historic, no-frills dive opened in 1933 and has been serving stunningly cheap bottles and drafts ever since. Normally the move is not to eat at a dive bar, but exceptions are made in the name of free hot dogs.

A giant pig standing up and waving.
A life size pig welcome’s you to Rudy’s
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Jimmy's Corner

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This grimy, narrow bar in the heart of Times Square is full of character, and only recently reopened after owner and boxing world legend Jimmy Glenn passed away due to coronavirus complications in 2020. Beers start at less than $4 and are always served cold.

An exterior view of Jimmy’s Corner during the coronavirus pandemic on May 13, 2020.
Jimmy’s Corner in 2020.
Noam Galai/Getty Images

Billymark's West

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Billymark’s brick-walled exterior houses a Chelsea time machine (it opened in 1956) that is open from 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. every day of the week. This is a dive in its pure form.

The Jar Bar

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Enjoy $6 jar-and-shot specials in the backyard, and outside food is welcome at this Sunnyside dive. Beloved by locals, neighborhood watering hole the Jar Bar is open on both Thanksgiving and Christmas, it shows the games, and offers pool, darts, and other games.

Johnny's Bar

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Very tiny and very divey, Johnny’s in the West Village is a time-capsule bar, otherwise surrounded by an ever-changing neighborhood.

The Stonewall Inn gets all the attention when it comes to NYC’s most historic gay bars, but Julius is even older and less of a tourist destination. Well drinks and beers are under $10, which is just one reason this narrow bar is often packed — though it’s cash only. The underrated burger, cooked on grill top across the wooden bar, is also very popular after a drink or two.

A facade of a gay bar called Julius with stucco walls and a large window with lettering in green.
The entrance to Julius.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Blue & Gold Tavern

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With mostly friendly bartenders, Blue and Gold Tavern is an East Village veteran, offering super cheap drinks, a real mix of customers, pool, and a jukebox.

International Bar

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This is the third home for International Bar, which started on St. Mark’s Place in the ’70s and then had a stint down the street. Now it has settled into the former site of Coal Yard, where the crowd is local, there is a constant flow of New York characters, and cans of beer start at $4.

Cherry Tavern

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A ‘70s-era, no-frills bar filled with locals in between Death & Company and Amor Y Amargo.

7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs

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Horseshoe Bar, or 7B, with over 30 taps, has been around forever, it seems, though it’s a favorite among punk rockers of a certain era and beyond.It’s often a cameo in Russian Doll, and our sister publication reminds us it’s been in Jessica Jones, Crocodile DundeeThe Godfather Part IIRent, and lots and lots of Law & Order.

Nancy Whiskey Pub

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Open since 1967, this Tribeca bar is beloved for its dumpy, no-frills vibe in one of New York’s priciest neighborhoods. The pours are generous, the prices are great, and there’s a shuffleboard table. Yes, you can eat here: Burgers, cheesesteaks, grilled cheese, and chicken fingers are on the menu.

Welcome to the Johnsons

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The vibe at this LES staple is a 1970s basement laden with wood and plastic, but dirtier. The affordable drinks add to the dingy charm.

Cocktails being sold to someone on the sidewalk through the front door.
Dispensing cocktails from the window at Welcome to the Johnsons.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Rocka Rolla

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Rocka Rolla comes from the same people behind some of Brooklyn’s best dives, including Do Or Dive, Lucky Dog, Skinny Dennis, and others, but this Williamsburg watering hole is one of our favorites of the bunch. It’s located steps from the Birria-Landia taco truck, and brings together the best of dive bar conventions — classic rock, beer served in goblets, frozen coffee drinks — in a spacious setting with room to spread out. Now open noon to 4 a.m., with a Monday night concert played on the big screen, like Judas Priest and Blondie, starting at 9 p.m.

For the locals that swarm Alibi in Fort Greene, the go-to move is often a bottle of Bud. There’s a pool table, arcade games, and an actually nice outdoor patio. And yes, it’s cash only.

Tip Top Bar & Grill

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Aside from being a literal dive bar (it’s on the basement level), this Bed-Stuy bar embodies every sense of the word: mind-blowingly dirty and wonderfully cheap. It’s closed on Mondays.

Brooklyn Ice House

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Between the $6 beer and shot combos and $6 Frito pies, Brooklyn Ice House is a reliable stop any day of the week. Cash only.

Sharlene's

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A go-to dive with comfortable booths and a bit of attitude used to be called Mooney’s and changed to the current iteration when Sharlene Frank bought it in 2009.

The Punch Bowl

The location has been occupied by bars since New York City’s pre-Prohibition Era. It’s the kind of place to grab a seat and settle in for hours.

Glacken's Bar & Grill

Glacken’s is nothing if not reliable: It has been pouring beer in the neighborhood since 1940 and hasn’t slowed down for, give or take, 80 years. Doesn’t hurt that it’s within walking distance of Yankee Stadium, too.

Reif's Bar

Open since 1942, Reif’s is a neighborhood bar with a friendly staff, where patrons all seem to know each other. PBRs are always flowing, whether inside or on the bar’s outdoor patio.

Paradise Alley

Paradise Alley is ideal for those hunting for a comfortable, neighborhood spot to watch a game with friends and a bucket of beer. There’s a pool table, a jukebox, and outdoor space to hang in the warm weather.

Rudy's Bar & Grill

This historic, no-frills dive opened in 1933 and has been serving stunningly cheap bottles and drafts ever since. Normally the move is not to eat at a dive bar, but exceptions are made in the name of free hot dogs.

A giant pig standing up and waving.
A life size pig welcome’s you to Rudy’s
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Jimmy's Corner

This grimy, narrow bar in the heart of Times Square is full of character, and only recently reopened after owner and boxing world legend Jimmy Glenn passed away due to coronavirus complications in 2020. Beers start at less than $4 and are always served cold.

An exterior view of Jimmy’s Corner during the coronavirus pandemic on May 13, 2020.
Jimmy’s Corner in 2020.
Noam Galai/Getty Images

Billymark's West

Billymark’s brick-walled exterior houses a Chelsea time machine (it opened in 1956) that is open from 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. every day of the week. This is a dive in its pure form.

The Jar Bar

Enjoy $6 jar-and-shot specials in the backyard, and outside food is welcome at this Sunnyside dive. Beloved by locals, neighborhood watering hole the Jar Bar is open on both Thanksgiving and Christmas, it shows the games, and offers pool, darts, and other games.

Johnny's Bar

Very tiny and very divey, Johnny’s in the West Village is a time-capsule bar, otherwise surrounded by an ever-changing neighborhood.

Julius

The Stonewall Inn gets all the attention when it comes to NYC’s most historic gay bars, but Julius is even older and less of a tourist destination. Well drinks and beers are under $10, which is just one reason this narrow bar is often packed — though it’s cash only. The underrated burger, cooked on grill top across the wooden bar, is also very popular after a drink or two.

A facade of a gay bar called Julius with stucco walls and a large window with lettering in green.
The entrance to Julius.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Blue & Gold Tavern

With mostly friendly bartenders, Blue and Gold Tavern is an East Village veteran, offering super cheap drinks, a real mix of customers, pool, and a jukebox.

International Bar

This is the third home for International Bar, which started on St. Mark’s Place in the ’70s and then had a stint down the street. Now it has settled into the former site of Coal Yard, where the crowd is local, there is a constant flow of New York characters, and cans of beer start at $4.

Cherry Tavern

A ‘70s-era, no-frills bar filled with locals in between Death & Company and Amor Y Amargo.

7B Horseshoe Bar aka Vazacs

Horseshoe Bar, or 7B, with over 30 taps, has been around forever, it seems, though it’s a favorite among punk rockers of a certain era and beyond.It’s often a cameo in Russian Doll, and our sister publication reminds us it’s been in Jessica Jones, Crocodile DundeeThe Godfather Part IIRent, and lots and lots of Law & Order.

Nancy Whiskey Pub

Open since 1967, this Tribeca bar is beloved for its dumpy, no-frills vibe in one of New York’s priciest neighborhoods. The pours are generous, the prices are great, and there’s a shuffleboard table. Yes, you can eat here: Burgers, cheesesteaks, grilled cheese, and chicken fingers are on the menu.

Related Maps

Welcome to the Johnsons

The vibe at this LES staple is a 1970s basement laden with wood and plastic, but dirtier. The affordable drinks add to the dingy charm.

Cocktails being sold to someone on the sidewalk through the front door.
Dispensing cocktails from the window at Welcome to the Johnsons.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Rocka Rolla

Rocka Rolla comes from the same people behind some of Brooklyn’s best dives, including Do Or Dive, Lucky Dog, Skinny Dennis, and others, but this Williamsburg watering hole is one of our favorites of the bunch. It’s located steps from the Birria-Landia taco truck, and brings together the best of dive bar conventions — classic rock, beer served in goblets, frozen coffee drinks — in a spacious setting with room to spread out. Now open noon to 4 a.m., with a Monday night concert played on the big screen, like Judas Priest and Blondie, starting at 9 p.m.

Alibi

For the locals that swarm Alibi in Fort Greene, the go-to move is often a bottle of Bud. There’s a pool table, arcade games, and an actually nice outdoor patio. And yes, it’s cash only.

Tip Top Bar & Grill

Aside from being a literal dive bar (it’s on the basement level), this Bed-Stuy bar embodies every sense of the word: mind-blowingly dirty and wonderfully cheap. It’s closed on Mondays.

Brooklyn Ice House

Between the $6 beer and shot combos and $6 Frito pies, Brooklyn Ice House is a reliable stop any day of the week. Cash only.

Sharlene's

A go-to dive with comfortable booths and a bit of attitude used to be called Mooney’s and changed to the current iteration when Sharlene Frank bought it in 2009.

Related Maps