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PJ Clarke's
PJ Clarke's
Daniel Krieger

The Oldest Bars in New York City

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PJ Clarke's
| Daniel Krieger

With development encroaching on New York's classic haunts, now is the time to recognize the stalwarts: the city's oldest bars serving beer and booze, some for over a hundred years. Here's a reminder of the places with character, characters, and decades' worth of stories.

Note: Restaurants are listed based on geography, south to north in Manhattan. This is an updated map originally published in 2012.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Ear Inn

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326 Spring St.
New York, NY 10013
(212) 431-9750
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In a building that dates from 1817, the Ear Inn started serving beer and spirits in the mid-19th century, operating without a name until new owners christened it the Ear Inn in 1977. Go here for fantastic regulars, late-night music, a fine Guinness, owner Martin Sheridan and staff.

2. P.J. Clarke's

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915 3rd Ave.
New York, NY 10022
(212) 317-1616
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PJ Clarke's building on Third Avenue was built in 1868, becoming a bar in 1884. Starting when PJ Clarke himself bought the bar in 1912, it became a destination for the rich and famous, including Elizabeth Taylor, Jackie Kennedy, and Nat King Cole. The bartenders there make a pretty mean Manhattan.

3. White Horse Tavern

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567 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 989-3956
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Dating back to 1880, the White Horse Tavern was a center of bohemian culture in the '50s and '60s, as a favorite of Dylan Thomas, Jack Kerouac, James Baldwin, and others.

4. Fraunces Tavern

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54 Pearl St.
New York, NY 10004
A whole lot of beer gets poured at Fraunces Tavern, established in 1762, but it's also a gathering spot for several cocktail and whiskey clubs, with the Dingle Whiskey Bar a destination for its Scotch collection.

5. Pete's Tavern

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129 E 18th St.
New York, NY 10003
(212) 473-7676
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O Henry was a regular at this Union Square drinking hole. It opened in 1864—though drinking likely happened in the location before that—becoming Healy's in 1899 and Pete's Tavern later on.

6. Julius'

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159 W 10th St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 929-9672
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New York's oldest gay bar, opened in Greenwich Village in 1840 as a grocery, operating as a bar since 1864.

7. Landmark Tavern

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626 11th Ave.
New York, NY 10036
(212) 757-8595
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Originally opened in 1868, the Landmark Tavern — an original gastropub — kept pouring drinks through Prohibition by turning its third floor into a speakeasy. It's the site of the original shoreline and had been a dockworker bar. The Landmark changed hands around 2004 and was refurbished.

8. Old Town Bar

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45 E 18th St.
New York, NY 10003
(212) 529-6732
The Old Town Bar has been serving drinks near Union Square since 1892. It also purports to have the city's oldest dumbwaiter and 102-year-old urinals in the men's room.

9. Rudy's Bar & Grill

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627 9th Ave.
New York, NY 10036
(646) 707-0890
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Rudy’s got one of New York’s the first liquor licenses when prohibition ended in 1933 and has since become one of the city's finest dive bars. "Sidle up to the original mahogany bar, custom-made for $300 on the Bowery," reads the website. "You’re hip-deep in good company now in our legendary microcosm of New York, as friendly, unpretentious, and wildly diverse as the best of the city itself." Free Hebrew National hot dogs with the purchase of a drink.

10. Mulberry Street Bar

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176 1/2 Mulberry St.
New York, NY 10013
(212) 226-9345
This Little Italy bar and restaurant has been open since 1908, starting as a dive and going a little classier more recently.

11. McSorley's Old Ale House

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15 E 7th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 473-9148
This originally men-only pub has roots to 1854 but did not allow women in until 1970. Choose from dark or light ale, and now, Feltman's hot dogs.
McSorleys

12. Peter McManus Pub

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152 7th Ave
New York, NY 10011
(212) 929-9691
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Open since 1911 and in this location since 1936, this is a family-run neighborhood pub. Like lots of longtime places, it's in danger of closing due to development by the year's end.
McManus Cafe

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1. Ear Inn

326 Spring St., New York, NY 10013
In a building that dates from 1817, the Ear Inn started serving beer and spirits in the mid-19th century, operating without a name until new owners christened it the Ear Inn in 1977. Go here for fantastic regulars, late-night music, a fine Guinness, owner Martin Sheridan and staff.
326 Spring St.
New York, NY 10013

2. P.J. Clarke's

915 3rd Ave., New York, NY 10022
PJ Clarke's building on Third Avenue was built in 1868, becoming a bar in 1884. Starting when PJ Clarke himself bought the bar in 1912, it became a destination for the rich and famous, including Elizabeth Taylor, Jackie Kennedy, and Nat King Cole. The bartenders there make a pretty mean Manhattan.
915 3rd Ave.
New York, NY 10022

3. White Horse Tavern

567 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
Dating back to 1880, the White Horse Tavern was a center of bohemian culture in the '50s and '60s, as a favorite of Dylan Thomas, Jack Kerouac, James Baldwin, and others.
567 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

4. Fraunces Tavern

54 Pearl St., New York, NY 10004
A whole lot of beer gets poured at Fraunces Tavern, established in 1762, but it's also a gathering spot for several cocktail and whiskey clubs, with the Dingle Whiskey Bar a destination for its Scotch collection.
54 Pearl St.
New York, NY 10004

5. Pete's Tavern

129 E 18th St., New York, NY 10003
O Henry was a regular at this Union Square drinking hole. It opened in 1864—though drinking likely happened in the location before that—becoming Healy's in 1899 and Pete's Tavern later on.
129 E 18th St.
New York, NY 10003

6. Julius'

159 W 10th St, New York, NY 10014
New York's oldest gay bar, opened in Greenwich Village in 1840 as a grocery, operating as a bar since 1864.
159 W 10th St
New York, NY 10014

7. Landmark Tavern

626 11th Ave., New York, NY 10036
Originally opened in 1868, the Landmark Tavern — an original gastropub — kept pouring drinks through Prohibition by turning its third floor into a speakeasy. It's the site of the original shoreline and had been a dockworker bar. The Landmark changed hands around 2004 and was refurbished.
626 11th Ave.
New York, NY 10036

8. Old Town Bar

45 E 18th St., New York, NY 10003
The Old Town Bar has been serving drinks near Union Square since 1892. It also purports to have the city's oldest dumbwaiter and 102-year-old urinals in the men's room.
45 E 18th St.
New York, NY 10003

9. Rudy's Bar & Grill

627 9th Ave., New York, NY 10036
Rudy’s got one of New York’s the first liquor licenses when prohibition ended in 1933 and has since become one of the city's finest dive bars. "Sidle up to the original mahogany bar, custom-made for $300 on the Bowery," reads the website. "You’re hip-deep in good company now in our legendary microcosm of New York, as friendly, unpretentious, and wildly diverse as the best of the city itself." Free Hebrew National hot dogs with the purchase of a drink.
627 9th Ave.
New York, NY 10036

10. Mulberry Street Bar

176 1/2 Mulberry St., New York, NY 10013
This Little Italy bar and restaurant has been open since 1908, starting as a dive and going a little classier more recently.
176 1/2 Mulberry St.
New York, NY 10013

11. McSorley's Old Ale House

15 E 7th St, New York, NY 10003
McSorleys
This originally men-only pub has roots to 1854 but did not allow women in until 1970. Choose from dark or light ale, and now, Feltman's hot dogs.
15 E 7th St
New York, NY 10003

12. Peter McManus Pub

152 7th Ave, New York, NY 10011
McManus Cafe
Open since 1911 and in this location since 1936, this is a family-run neighborhood pub. Like lots of longtime places, it's in danger of closing due to development by the year's end.
152 7th Ave
New York, NY 10011

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