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A drink in a rocks glass sits on a wooden bar.
A cocktail from Sip of Sip & Guzzle, now open in Greenwich Village.
Sip & Guzzle

The Hottest New Bars in New York City, February 2024

A spot from the Maison Premiere team and a big-deal destination from Tokyo join the list this month

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A cocktail from Sip of Sip & Guzzle, now open in Greenwich Village.
| Sip & Guzzle

Welcome to the Bars Heatmap, a guide to the hottest places to grab a dirty martini in New York City right now. After subsisting on takeout drinks served from plastic cups for the first year of the pandemic, the city’s cocktail and dive bars are back in full swing, reinventing classics and cashing in on nostalgia.

New to the list in February: Tigre, a cocktail bar from the Maison Premiere team, and Sip & Guzzle, a two-in-one import from Tokyo.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

The Tusk Bar

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The Tusk Bar is the kind of swanky bar well positioned for a sophisticated type of after-work drink: There’s the “Hail Caesar” (the team’s play on a Bloody Mary gone nighttime with soy and Clamato), a martini with shallot vinegar, and a section with mini drinks served with an oyster. Food comes courtesy of the Wildair team and includes a shrimp cocktail, chickpea fritters with Thai basil aioli, and a passionfruit pavlova. The bar is part of a trio of projects at the Evelyn Hotel, with a restaurant and cafe to follow.

Cocktails with oysters at the Tusk Bar.
Cocktails with oysters at the Tusk Bar.
Eric Medsker/the Tusk Bar

Angel’s Share

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Angel’s Share, an influential cocktail bar that was open in the East Village for more than 30 years, made headlines when it closed during the pandemic. The legendary bar has since reopened at this new address, where Erina Yoshida, the daughter of the original owner, is running the show.

A huge, celestial painting with winged cherubs hangs above the bar at Angel’s Share.
The bar’s famous mural lives on at the new location.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Sip & Guzzle

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Sip & Guzzle is a take on the Tokyo cocktail destination called the SG Club, a new spot that’s two destinations in one. Steering Sip on the lower level, there’s Shingo Gokan: Before opening eight bars across Japan and China, Gokan had been the bar director for a decade at Manhattan’s Angel’s Share, which debuted in 1993, shuttered, then reopened in July in the West Village. Alum of Employees Only, Steve Schneider helms the upper level, Guzzle, offering classics and more familiar cocktails. In the kitchen serving swanky izakaya fare and Japanese street food, there’s Mike Bagale, former executive chef of three-Michelin-starred Alinea in Chicago. 

Inside a dark lair for drinking.
Inside the lower level, Sip, at Sip & Guzzle.
Sasha Arutyunova/Sip & Guzzle

Paradise Lost

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In some ways, Paradise Lost embodies the complaints we have with cocktail culture right now. Mixed drinks start at around $20 each, and the bar takes reservations online, like it’s a restaurant. Despite those snags, this tiki bar is worth your time. The cocktails, like a piña colada served out a coconut milk can, are complex, and the setting is unforgettable: When was the last time you sat in a dining room that looked like this? There are snacks, too: popcorn, with sea buckthorn and brown butter, and pastrami musubi, made with pastrami from Katz’s Delicatessen.

Superbueno

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This Mexican cocktail bar is run by a former employee of Ghost Donkey, a popular bar in the East Village that closed during the pandemic. The bar stays open until 2 a.m. or later each night with a rowdy crowd that chases mezcal shots with beef consommé. (Don’t blame them: It’s on the menu.) Cocktails, like a green mango martini and a salted tamarind milk punch, start at around $20.

The pink-lit bar at Superbueno.
The bar at Superbueno.
Superbueno

Chinato

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Chinato co-owner Ray Zhou used to work at Double Chicken Please, said to be one of the best cocktail bars in the world. His Lower East Side bar serves playful cocktails made with goji berry and lychee black tea. The food menu, from Zhaojin Dai, a sous chef of the two-Michelin-star Jungsik, has frog drumsticks and mushroom tempura.

A cocktail at Chinato on the Lower East Side.
A cocktail at Chinato on the Lower East Side.
Chinato/Glowing Studios

William Elliott, bar director at sibling location, Maison Premiere, oversees the beverage menu at Tigre, which pulled ideas from Playboy’s Host & Bar Book by Thomas Mario. Cocktails have names like the Rolls Royce and Mister Softee. The space features a horseshoe-shaped bar that evokes, “residential sexiness in New York from the 1970s, ’80s, and maybe even ’90s,” according to Grub Street.

Inside a dark, swanky bar.
Inside Tigre from the folks behind Maison Premiere.
Eric Medsker/Tigre

Mr. Melo

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This winter, the owner of Bar Beau in Williamsburg outfitted the space with wood paneling and fancy speakers, turning it into a listening bar. (The raised platform in the back, where customers used to eat brunch, is now a stage for DJs.) The transformed bar sells “compost” cocktails — drinks like a dirty martini and margarita that use feta brine, eggplant skins, and other leftover ingredients from the kitchen. Or, there are drinks on tap, like a Staten Island Iced Tea, made with eight Italian amari, and the John Dough, with mezcal and oat milk-clarified passion fruit.

A dim bar, Mr. Melo, is outfitted with speakers on its wall.
Mr. Melo is a listening bar.
Brandyn Liu/Mr. Melo

Carousel

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Carousel is a new bar in Bushwick that’s already packed. It’s run by the owners of Brooklyn bars Birdy’s and Coyote Club, but don’t expect another dive: The massive bar, with two counters to order drinks from, is outfitted with vintage decor. There’s a retro conversation pit, pool tables, a photo booth, and a dance floor with live music. The drinks menu has mai tais and a “cafécito” espresso martini with rum.

One of the counters at Carousel, a new bar in Bushwick, Brooklyn.
One of two bars at Carousel.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Danger Danger

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The duo behind the dance-y natural wine bar, Mansions, opened another bar last summer. As Grub Street describes it: Danger Danger is decked out in zebra print, with thumping 1980s euro pop, pinball machines, and Red Bull spritzes. To open the bar, the owners teamed up with the duo behind the acclaimed Lower East Side speakeasy, Attaboy. A Tuesday happy hour deal encourages patrons to bring New Wave vinyl records in exchange for shots.

The Tusk Bar

The Tusk Bar is the kind of swanky bar well positioned for a sophisticated type of after-work drink: There’s the “Hail Caesar” (the team’s play on a Bloody Mary gone nighttime with soy and Clamato), a martini with shallot vinegar, and a section with mini drinks served with an oyster. Food comes courtesy of the Wildair team and includes a shrimp cocktail, chickpea fritters with Thai basil aioli, and a passionfruit pavlova. The bar is part of a trio of projects at the Evelyn Hotel, with a restaurant and cafe to follow.

Cocktails with oysters at the Tusk Bar.
Cocktails with oysters at the Tusk Bar.
Eric Medsker/the Tusk Bar

Angel’s Share

Angel’s Share, an influential cocktail bar that was open in the East Village for more than 30 years, made headlines when it closed during the pandemic. The legendary bar has since reopened at this new address, where Erina Yoshida, the daughter of the original owner, is running the show.

A huge, celestial painting with winged cherubs hangs above the bar at Angel’s Share.
The bar’s famous mural lives on at the new location.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Sip & Guzzle

Sip & Guzzle is a take on the Tokyo cocktail destination called the SG Club, a new spot that’s two destinations in one. Steering Sip on the lower level, there’s Shingo Gokan: Before opening eight bars across Japan and China, Gokan had been the bar director for a decade at Manhattan’s Angel’s Share, which debuted in 1993, shuttered, then reopened in July in the West Village. Alum of Employees Only, Steve Schneider helms the upper level, Guzzle, offering classics and more familiar cocktails. In the kitchen serving swanky izakaya fare and Japanese street food, there’s Mike Bagale, former executive chef of three-Michelin-starred Alinea in Chicago. 

Inside a dark lair for drinking.
Inside the lower level, Sip, at Sip & Guzzle.
Sasha Arutyunova/Sip & Guzzle

Paradise Lost

In some ways, Paradise Lost embodies the complaints we have with cocktail culture right now. Mixed drinks start at around $20 each, and the bar takes reservations online, like it’s a restaurant. Despite those snags, this tiki bar is worth your time. The cocktails, like a piña colada served out a coconut milk can, are complex, and the setting is unforgettable: When was the last time you sat in a dining room that looked like this? There are snacks, too: popcorn, with sea buckthorn and brown butter, and pastrami musubi, made with pastrami from Katz’s Delicatessen.

Superbueno

This Mexican cocktail bar is run by a former employee of Ghost Donkey, a popular bar in the East Village that closed during the pandemic. The bar stays open until 2 a.m. or later each night with a rowdy crowd that chases mezcal shots with beef consommé. (Don’t blame them: It’s on the menu.) Cocktails, like a green mango martini and a salted tamarind milk punch, start at around $20.

The pink-lit bar at Superbueno.
The bar at Superbueno.
Superbueno

Chinato

Chinato co-owner Ray Zhou used to work at Double Chicken Please, said to be one of the best cocktail bars in the world. His Lower East Side bar serves playful cocktails made with goji berry and lychee black tea. The food menu, from Zhaojin Dai, a sous chef of the two-Michelin-star Jungsik, has frog drumsticks and mushroom tempura.

A cocktail at Chinato on the Lower East Side.
A cocktail at Chinato on the Lower East Side.
Chinato/Glowing Studios

Tigre

William Elliott, bar director at sibling location, Maison Premiere, oversees the beverage menu at Tigre, which pulled ideas from Playboy’s Host & Bar Book by Thomas Mario. Cocktails have names like the Rolls Royce and Mister Softee. The space features a horseshoe-shaped bar that evokes, “residential sexiness in New York from the 1970s, ’80s, and maybe even ’90s,” according to Grub Street.

Inside a dark, swanky bar.
Inside Tigre from the folks behind Maison Premiere.
Eric Medsker/Tigre

Mr. Melo

This winter, the owner of Bar Beau in Williamsburg outfitted the space with wood paneling and fancy speakers, turning it into a listening bar. (The raised platform in the back, where customers used to eat brunch, is now a stage for DJs.) The transformed bar sells “compost” cocktails — drinks like a dirty martini and margarita that use feta brine, eggplant skins, and other leftover ingredients from the kitchen. Or, there are drinks on tap, like a Staten Island Iced Tea, made with eight Italian amari, and the John Dough, with mezcal and oat milk-clarified passion fruit.

A dim bar, Mr. Melo, is outfitted with speakers on its wall.
Mr. Melo is a listening bar.
Brandyn Liu/Mr. Melo

Carousel

Carousel is a new bar in Bushwick that’s already packed. It’s run by the owners of Brooklyn bars Birdy’s and Coyote Club, but don’t expect another dive: The massive bar, with two counters to order drinks from, is outfitted with vintage decor. There’s a retro conversation pit, pool tables, a photo booth, and a dance floor with live music. The drinks menu has mai tais and a “cafécito” espresso martini with rum.

One of the counters at Carousel, a new bar in Bushwick, Brooklyn.
One of two bars at Carousel.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Danger Danger

The duo behind the dance-y natural wine bar, Mansions, opened another bar last summer. As Grub Street describes it: Danger Danger is decked out in zebra print, with thumping 1980s euro pop, pinball machines, and Red Bull spritzes. To open the bar, the owners teamed up with the duo behind the acclaimed Lower East Side speakeasy, Attaboy. A Tuesday happy hour deal encourages patrons to bring New Wave vinyl records in exchange for shots.

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