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A cake at Noglu
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18 NYC Restaurants Great for Gluten-Free Dining

From fast-casual to fine-dining, the gluten-sensitive have plenty of options

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A cake at Noglu
| Noglu [Official]

Dining with a gluten allergy isn't as tricky as it used to be — more and more quality restaurants are becoming aware of diners with specific preferences and needs. Now New York offers a whole range of restaurants with the option to go gluten-free, from wheat-free versions of Chinese takeout classics to Michelin-starred fine dining establishments like chef Michael White's Marea. This list accommodates gluten allergies, but doesn't make those without suffer, too — just remember to notify the restaurant about allergies and food sensitivities before dining.

Note: This is an updated version of a map originally published in 2016.

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Ayurveda Cafe

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This longtime Upper West Side favorite — where the focus on health and wellness is reflected by its cozy interior and calming music — serves fresh, homemade Indian food. The set menu changes daily, cycling through classics like yellow lentil dal and stewed okra, so diners have a new experience each visit. Most of the dishes are naturally gluten-free and vegetarian, but Ayurveda offers gluten-free naan and a dessert alternative for those who ask. 

Frédérique Jules opened this UES neighborhood gluten-free bakery and restaurant in 2015. With two other locations in Paris, Noglu offers savory dishes like a croque monsieur, frittatas, sandwiches, and pancake, plus gluten-free versions of classic French pastries, including quiche, lemon tarts, and cream puffs. The minimal and modern yet warm interior makes for a welcome brunch stop blocks away from the Guggenheim Museum. 

By the Way Bakery

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Owner Helene Godin established this gluten-free, dairy-free, kosher haven in 2011. Standouts include the Amy cake, a mini confetti bundt cake, and the decadent chocolate fudge cookies, which have a crunchy outer crust and chewy center. The bakery also makes custom cakes and has another New York location on the UWS.

Pasta expert Michael White’s acclaimed upscale Italian house near Central Park specializes in seafood, and a good portion of the menu comes naturally gluten-free. Focusing on the naturally wheat-free seafood dishes wouldn’t be a total mistake, but for those interested in partaking in pasta, Marea offers versions of it gluten-free to diners who ask for it. The Michelin-starred restaurant offers both lunch and dinner, including a $95 seafood tasting menu during the day.

Torishin

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The yakitori restaurant with a tasting menu is one of the best places to try Japanese-style meat skewers in New York. Eater critic Ryan Sutton awarded the Upper East Side restaurant three stars. Meat eaters can sample parts of the animal that aren’t widely available at most restaurants, such as soft knee bones, whole heart, neck, and artery. There aren't really wheat products here, but particularly gluten-sensitive folk should notify the staff about allergies to avoid soy sauce.

Lilli and Loo

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This UES pan-Asian restaurant offers takes on Thai and Chinese cuisine — and diners can request its separate gluten-free menu, which includes takeout crowd pleasers like the General Tso’s chicken, pad Thai, and pork dumplings. It’s all served in a sleek, bi-level space, though takeout and delivery is available, too.

Friedman's Lunch

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The casual restaurant first opened in Chelsea Market in 2009, and an original owner with celiac disease insisted on providing a mostly gluten-free menu — leading to pancakes, waffles, sandwiches, and more that arrive gluten-free upon request. Eater critic Robert Sietsema particularly likes the pastrami sandwich, a stand-out option that’s prone to sell out. It’s a classic American food staple for gluten-free diners and gluten eaters alike, and it now boasts seven locations.

Sans Bakery

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Owner Erica Fair, who has a wheat allergy, opened this entirely gluten-free bakery in 2017 in the Falchi Building, which is like Long Island City’s Chelsea Market. Treats run the gamut from cinnamon sugar doughnuts and chocolate chip cookies to zucchini bread and blueberry muffins. Custom cakes are available, too, for a gluten-free special occasion.

The Little Beet Table

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Gluten-free diners seeking a full-service experience can check out chef Franklin Becker’s spin-off of his popular gluten-free fast-casual spot, the Little Beet. Everything on the menu at this Kips Bay restaurant, helmed by culinary director Matt Aita, is seasonal and gluten-free, meaning people with serious allergies can dine without concern. Expect dishes like cauliflower and mushroom tacos or banana bread with hazelnut butter.

A warm, wooden dining room with wood paneling, wooden chairs, and an exposed brick wall. Bess Adler/Eater

Santina

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Santina’s colorful, breezy space sits right underneath the High Line — ideal for a brunch or a get-together to catch up with friends. The coastal Italian restaurant’s menu has many items that are naturally gluten-free, such as its selection of cecina, Italian chickpea pancakes. But pastas here are gluten-free too, including a cacio e pepe or lobster fettuccine. Grab a negroni to go along with it. This restaurant comes from Major Food Group, and accordingly, prices here veer on the slightly higher side. Those cecina range from $16 to $24, while mains are all $27 and up. 

Santina’s dining room has a chandelier up top and floor-to-ceiling windows in the back. Nick Solares/Eater

One of New York’s most exciting restaurants just happens to be very friendly to people who are eating gluten-free. Chef Enrique Olvera, who opened the renowned Pujol in Mexico City, and Daniela Soto-Innes cook up modern Mexican food that's served in a comfortable environment. Most of the menu is accidentally gluten-free already, particularly due to an emphasis on corn instead of wheat. Both the Times and Eater critic Ryan Sutton awarded the Flatiron restaurant three stars.

Tacombi Bleecker

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The hit taqueria mini-chain serves its tacos on corn tortillas, made fresh each day on-site. Each location has tacos inspired by the Yucatan and beachside taquerias in Mexico — including al pastor, black bean and sweet potato, and al pastor. The restaurant also serves sangrias by the pitcher and a roster of fresh juices, and there are seven other locations.

A sunny dining rom has green and yellow square tiles and small, square tables. Nick Solares/Eater

After chef Marco Canora faced health problems, he revamped his East Village restaurant to focus on what he considers to be healthier food. Hearth now offers more offal, more vegetables, and even a burger without the bread. One section of the menu does offer "grains," but every other section is largely safe for the gluten-intolerant. The farm-to-table food has been a hit; Eater critic Ryan Sutton awarded the new version of the restaurant three stars.

Dirt Candy

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In 2015, chef Amanda Cohen moved her acclaimed vegetarian restaurant from a tiny East Village storefront to a larger space on the Lower East Side. Cohen is particularly sensitive to the fact that people with dietary restrictions visit Dirt Candy; nearly everything can be made gluten-free (or vegan) if asked. People particularly like the Brussels sprout tacos, which come out sizzling on a stone plate.

An entire gluten-free menu at this Neapolitan pizza stalwart offers plenty of options for the wheat-averse. Besides 19 pies, ranging from the classic margherita to one with pistachio pesto and sausage, there are gluten-free arancino and salad. The original location is in Greenwich Village.

A circular pizza with whole cherry tomatoes and squash blossoms on top. Melissa McCart/Eater

Dosa Royale

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South Indian cuisine, by its nature, uses minimal gluten products. Dosa Royale in particular knocks out stellar dosas, which are made from rice and black lentils. The Clinton Hill restaurant started as a Smorgasburg vendor, filling dosas with curry, carrots, cabbage, paneer, and more. Nearly all of the dosa options come gluten-free, as do many of the curry and kebab entrees.

Masala dosa with all the trimmings Robert Sietsema/Eater

Toad Style

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Bed-Stuy’s Toad Style is not only largely gluten-free, but it’s also vegan. The whimsical, counter-service restaurant pulls flavors from around the globe in dishes such as barbecue jackfruit, mushroom banh mi, and gluten-free waffles. Any sandwich can be made gluten-free by putting it on a corn tortilla, and the rest of the dishes are already mainly compliant. Bonus: It’s BYOB.

Mother Dough Pizza

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This small bakery and pizzeria in Park Slope focuses on a different kind of dough — available gluten-free — that is naturally leavened and thick from the center to the rim. Eater critic Ryan Sutton calls it one of NYC’s best new pizzerias, saying that the crust “crackles like a good baguette, and it’s perfect for dredging through a pool of EVOO sprinkled with umami-rich grana padano.”

Margherita pizza at Mother Dough Ryan Sutton

Ayurveda Cafe

This longtime Upper West Side favorite — where the focus on health and wellness is reflected by its cozy interior and calming music — serves fresh, homemade Indian food. The set menu changes daily, cycling through classics like yellow lentil dal and stewed okra, so diners have a new experience each visit. Most of the dishes are naturally gluten-free and vegetarian, but Ayurveda offers gluten-free naan and a dessert alternative for those who ask. 

Noglu

Frédérique Jules opened this UES neighborhood gluten-free bakery and restaurant in 2015. With two other locations in Paris, Noglu offers savory dishes like a croque monsieur, frittatas, sandwiches, and pancake, plus gluten-free versions of classic French pastries, including quiche, lemon tarts, and cream puffs. The minimal and modern yet warm interior makes for a welcome brunch stop blocks away from the Guggenheim Museum. 

By the Way Bakery

Owner Helene Godin established this gluten-free, dairy-free, kosher haven in 2011. Standouts include the Amy cake, a mini confetti bundt cake, and the decadent chocolate fudge cookies, which have a crunchy outer crust and chewy center. The bakery also makes custom cakes and has another New York location on the UWS.

Marea

Pasta expert Michael White’s acclaimed upscale Italian house near Central Park specializes in seafood, and a good portion of the menu comes naturally gluten-free. Focusing on the naturally wheat-free seafood dishes wouldn’t be a total mistake, but for those interested in partaking in pasta, Marea offers versions of it gluten-free to diners who ask for it. The Michelin-starred restaurant offers both lunch and dinner, including a $95 seafood tasting menu during the day.

Torishin

The yakitori restaurant with a tasting menu is one of the best places to try Japanese-style meat skewers in New York. Eater critic Ryan Sutton awarded the Upper East Side restaurant three stars. Meat eaters can sample parts of the animal that aren’t widely available at most restaurants, such as soft knee bones, whole heart, neck, and artery. There aren't really wheat products here, but particularly gluten-sensitive folk should notify the staff about allergies to avoid soy sauce.

Lilli and Loo

This UES pan-Asian restaurant offers takes on Thai and Chinese cuisine — and diners can request its separate gluten-free menu, which includes takeout crowd pleasers like the General Tso’s chicken, pad Thai, and pork dumplings. It’s all served in a sleek, bi-level space, though takeout and delivery is available, too.

Friedman's Lunch

The casual restaurant first opened in Chelsea Market in 2009, and an original owner with celiac disease insisted on providing a mostly gluten-free menu — leading to pancakes, waffles, sandwiches, and more that arrive gluten-free upon request. Eater critic Robert Sietsema particularly likes the pastrami sandwich, a stand-out option that’s prone to sell out. It’s a classic American food staple for gluten-free diners and gluten eaters alike, and it now boasts seven locations.

Sans Bakery

Owner Erica Fair, who has a wheat allergy, opened this entirely gluten-free bakery in 2017 in the Falchi Building, which is like Long Island City’s Chelsea Market. Treats run the gamut from cinnamon sugar doughnuts and chocolate chip cookies to zucchini bread and blueberry muffins. Custom cakes are available, too, for a gluten-free special occasion.

The Little Beet Table

Gluten-free diners seeking a full-service experience can check out chef Franklin Becker’s spin-off of his popular gluten-free fast-casual spot, the Little Beet. Everything on the menu at this Kips Bay restaurant, helmed by culinary director Matt Aita, is seasonal and gluten-free, meaning people with serious allergies can dine without concern. Expect dishes like cauliflower and mushroom tacos or banana bread with hazelnut butter.

A warm, wooden dining room with wood paneling, wooden chairs, and an exposed brick wall. Bess Adler/Eater

Santina

Santina’s colorful, breezy space sits right underneath the High Line — ideal for a brunch or a get-together to catch up with friends. The coastal Italian restaurant’s menu has many items that are naturally gluten-free, such as its selection of cecina, Italian chickpea pancakes. But pastas here are gluten-free too, including a cacio e pepe or lobster fettuccine. Grab a negroni to go along with it. This restaurant comes from Major Food Group, and accordingly, prices here veer on the slightly higher side. Those cecina range from $16 to $24, while mains are all $27 and up. 

Santina’s dining room has a chandelier up top and floor-to-ceiling windows in the back. Nick Solares/Eater

Cosme

One of New York’s most exciting restaurants just happens to be very friendly to people who are eating gluten-free. Chef Enrique Olvera, who opened the renowned Pujol in Mexico City, and Daniela Soto-Innes cook up modern Mexican food that's served in a comfortable environment. Most of the menu is accidentally gluten-free already, particularly due to an emphasis on corn instead of wheat. Both the Times and Eater critic Ryan Sutton awarded the Flatiron restaurant three stars.

Tacombi Bleecker

The hit taqueria mini-chain serves its tacos on corn tortillas, made fresh each day on-site. Each location has tacos inspired by the Yucatan and beachside taquerias in Mexico — including al pastor, black bean and sweet potato, and al pastor. The restaurant also serves sangrias by the pitcher and a roster of fresh juices, and there are seven other locations.

A sunny dining rom has green and yellow square tiles and small, square tables. Nick Solares/Eater

Hearth

After chef Marco Canora faced health problems, he revamped his East Village restaurant to focus on what he considers to be healthier food. Hearth now offers more offal, more vegetables, and even a burger without the bread. One section of the menu does offer "grains," but every other section is largely safe for the gluten-intolerant. The farm-to-table food has been a hit; Eater critic Ryan Sutton awarded the new version of the restaurant three stars.

Dirt Candy

In 2015, chef Amanda Cohen moved her acclaimed vegetarian restaurant from a tiny East Village storefront to a larger space on the Lower East Side. Cohen is particularly sensitive to the fact that people with dietary restrictions visit Dirt Candy; nearly everything can be made gluten-free (or vegan) if asked. People particularly like the Brussels sprout tacos, which come out sizzling on a stone plate.

Keste

An entire gluten-free menu at this Neapolitan pizza stalwart offers plenty of options for the wheat-averse. Besides 19 pies, ranging from the classic margherita to one with pistachio pesto and sausage, there are gluten-free arancino and salad. The original location is in Greenwich Village.

A circular pizza with whole cherry tomatoes and squash blossoms on top. Melissa McCart/Eater

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Dosa Royale

South Indian cuisine, by its nature, uses minimal gluten products. Dosa Royale in particular knocks out stellar dosas, which are made from rice and black lentils. The Clinton Hill restaurant started as a Smorgasburg vendor, filling dosas with curry, carrots, cabbage, paneer, and more. Nearly all of the dosa options come gluten-free, as do many of the curry and kebab entrees.

Masala dosa with all the trimmings Robert Sietsema/Eater

Toad Style

Bed-Stuy’s Toad Style is not only largely gluten-free, but it’s also vegan. The whimsical, counter-service restaurant pulls flavors from around the globe in dishes such as barbecue jackfruit, mushroom banh mi, and gluten-free waffles. Any sandwich can be made gluten-free by putting it on a corn tortilla, and the rest of the dishes are already mainly compliant. Bonus: It’s BYOB.

Mother Dough Pizza

This small bakery and pizzeria in Park Slope focuses on a different kind of dough — available gluten-free — that is naturally leavened and thick from the center to the rim. Eater critic Ryan Sutton calls it one of NYC’s best new pizzerias, saying that the crust “crackles like a good baguette, and it’s perfect for dredging through a pool of EVOO sprinkled with umami-rich grana padano.”

Margherita pizza at Mother Dough Ryan Sutton

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