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A bowl with beef and vegetables Alex Staniloff/Eater

27 Top Chinese Restaurants in NYC

Top-notch soup dumplings, tacky hand-pulled noodles, mouth-numbing Sichuan, and other regional fare

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New York City is experiencing a Chinese food renaissance. Never before have the city’s offerings been so diverse; not only are multiple regions represented, but price points range, too. There are fast-casual spots like Xi’an Famous Foods, and there’s ambitious pan-regional fine dining like Atlas Kitchen. And where restaurateurs once needed to cater to Western tastes, many of today’s New York Chinese restaurants don’t have to so in order to survive.

A huge audience of discerning Chinese expats who seek flavors from home is fueling a highly competitive market of contemporary regional Chinese restaurants — one that means all of New York has access to a restaurant scene that’s better than it’s ever been. Below, find some of the top picks, from snacks from Yunnan and a hip restaurant for street food to fancy restaurants liberally inventing on pan-regional traditions. Plus, check out some stalwarts that set the stage.

Note: This is an updated version of a map originally published in December 2016.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Atlas Kitchen

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258 W 109th St
New York, NY 10025
(646) 928-0522
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Located just south of Columbia University, Atlas Kitchen is the most elegant of the new crop of Chinese restaurants appearing south of the campus, patronized by Chinese students and faculty. The bilevel space is decorated with themed murals that inspired the restaurant’s name, and chef Kaiyuan Li cooks food from several regions, including Sichuan, Beijing, Shanghai, and Dongbei, with special focus on his home province of Hunan. A separate section of the menu also presents Chinese-American classics. The beverage program focuses on teas, and for the time being, the restaurant is BYOB. 

People eating at white tables in a bright dining room Alex Staniloff/Eater

2. 108 Food- Dried Hot Pot

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2794 Broadway
New York, NY 10025

This dry hot pot high in Manhattan stands up to any Chinese restaurant in town at a similar price. Here’s how it works at 108 Food: Step up to a lavish display of raw ingredients deposited in metal tubs at the rear of the restaurant. An attendant with a sense of humor, her baseball cap turned askew, will assemble the chosen ingredients, putting the meat, poultry, and fish in one metal bowl, and the vegetable matter in another.

A man pointing at stir-fry ingredients as a worker fills a bowl with his choices Gary He/Eater

3. Friendship Foods BBQ

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36-22 Union St
Flushing, NY 11354
(917) 563-7856
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Friendship Foods BBQ — located on the northeastern edge of Flushing’s Chinatown — is a favorite of young people in the neighborhood, including high schoolers who might drop by for cumin-dusted kebabs and a hot pot after school. The deep narrow space is club-like, decorated with super-graphics of off road vehicles and whimsical sculptures. While kebabs in the Xinjiang style are a major part of the menu, fried rice and noodles are also available. Seafood and organ meats abound; beer is available. 

Assorted kebabs Robert Sietsema/Eater

4. You Garden Xiao Long Bao

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4107 Bell Blvd
Bayside, NY 11361
(718) 229-3388
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The Eater NY staff believes this Shanghai restaurant in Bayside, Queens serves the best soup dumplings in town. Smaller than usual, they’re thin skinned and bulging with a delicate gravy. With a fuller menu than its Flushing predecessor, it features a full range of Shanghai specialties, including other sorts of dumplings, small plates, noodles, soups, and bigger feeds like braised pork shoulder, sweet and sour sea bass, and eel in hot oil.

Chive and chicken chowder set into a yin and yang shape with green and beige broths Robert Sietsema/Eater

5. Joe’s Steam Rice Roll

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136-21 Roosevelt Ave
Flushing, NY 11354
(646) 203-7380

Joe’s Steam Rice Roll is dedicated to the rice roll, an item that can be ordered at dim sum but executed at a higher level here by Joe Rong. The Flushing gem uses an electric-powered stone mill to make its chang fen, which fills rice-based dough with ingredients such as beef and egg. There’s also a newer location in Manhattan’s Chinatown inside the Canal Street Market.

A white styrofoam plate with rice noodle and shrimp rolls Monica Burton/Eater

6. Szechwan Absolute

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39-16 Prince St Ste209
Flushing, NY 11354
(917) 983-6666
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The third Sichuan restaurant to appear in Flushing’s One Fulton Square retail and residential complex is less lavish and glitzy than the other two, but presents a solid picture of the provincial cuisine with a few turns and twists of its own, plus a plethora of less ubiquitous ingredients and organ meats. Wood ear mushrooms are paired with the firm green vegetable called celtuce, while an amped up version of Chongqing chicken features dough twists. The menu also offers some northern Chinese fare.

Chicken with chiles and dough twists Robert Sietsema/Eater

7. Lao Bei Fang Dumpling House

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83-05 Broadway
Elmhurst, NY 11373
(718) 639-3996

This neighborhood favorite in the shadow of the elevated LIRR tracks is wildly popular with the multiple national and cultural groups that inhabit Elmhurst. Simply everyone loves the pot stickers sold here, and lines form around lunch and in the late afternoons. Other offerings run to hand-pulled noodles in soups and congees. It’s serve yourself, and the comfortable dining room encourages lingering.

The exterior of Lao Bei Fang, with a red and green awning Robert Sietsema/Eater

8. Hao Noodle

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343 W 14th St
New York, NY 10014
(646) 882-0059
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Hao Noodle on the edge of the Meatpacking District is the second branch in the city of a Chinese chain headed by veteran restaurateur Zhu Rong. While the first partly focused on Sichuan cuisine from a tea house perspective, this one highlights Shanghai cuisine, and a sideline in small and delicate shish kebabs. The skylit dining room fills with sprays of flowers, making Hao Noodle one of the loveliest restaurants in town.

Diners in a dining room with flowers and a skylight Robert Sietsema/Eater

9. Auntie Guan's Kitchen

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108 W 14th St
New York, NY

The Dongbei cuisine of China’s northeastern province — and that of northern China in general — is presented in more complete form at the 14th Street Auntie Guan’s than Manhattan has seen before. (Previously, going to Flushing was necessary.) Thrill to “green bean sheet jelly,” a smorgasbord of salad ingredients surrounding a heap of clear mung bean noodles; and pork with pickled cabbage, a casserole that seems almost German with its sauerkraut-like fermented cabbage. Plenty of lamb and dumplings are on the menu, too, in addition to Sichuan fare.

The exterior of Auntie Guan’s Kitchen with a sign that has its name and red lantern lights Robert Sietsema/Eater

10. Uluh

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152A 2nd Ave
New York, NY 10003
(917) 261-5963
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Dim sum gets an upscale bent at Uluh Tea House, an East Village newcomer with a sleek space and visually striking presentation. Stunners like a rose lychee panna cotta dessert and a pumpkin custard puff made to look like a plump, squishy orange will be on many of the tables, but the restaurant’s also known for its dumplings and pan-Chinese dishes not typically found on dim sum carts, like Peking duck and pig trotters. As its name suggests, tea is a focus. The selection is wide-ranging, with both leaves ideal for a simple hot cup and trendy, colorful cold options topped with cheese foam. 

11. Tipsy Shanghai

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228 Thompson St
New York, NY 10012
(212) 763-0877
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Practically on the NYU campus, Tipsy Shanghai claims to be related to an actual restaurant in Shanghai founded in 1905. The upbeat interior is decorated with photos of Old Shanghai, bamboo is judiciously used, and the color scheme is red. The signature dish is Wuxi ribs and the dumplings are ably done, but avoid like the plague the separate menu of Chinese-American specialties.

Sauced ribs on a blue and white plate Robert Sietsema/Eater

12. Szechuan Mountain House

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23 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003
(917) 388-3866
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NYC is a town of superb Sichuan restaurants, and recently, more envelope-pushing versions have opened across the city. Szechuan Mountain House is one such example, expanding from Flushing to the East Village with a second-story St. Mark’s Place location. There are stellar versions of classics like mapo tofu and twice-cooked pork, but also find less ubiquitous fare, including variations on spicy stews. Every table will likely have the sliced pork belly with chile garlic sauce, where pork hangs over a device like laundry on a line. Expect a wait during prime times, and bring a small crew to finish huge portions. 

Sliced pork belly and cucumber hanging over a device to look like drying laundry, with chile garlic sauce underneath Jean Schwarzwalder/Eater

13. Le Sia

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8056, 11 E 7th St
New York, NY 10003
(646) 370-6423

Shellfish takes center stage at Le Sia, where crawfish, crab, and shrimp come doused in the customer’s choice of six sauces. The most famous of them is “13 flavors,” an umami-rich blend of clove, star anise, angelica dahurica, nutmeg, ginger, fennel, black cardamom, Sichuan peppercorn, dried tangerine peel, cinnamon, and galangal. Get a pound and don the bib and gloves for a full-on seafood feast, buoyed by grilled skewers and a fried rice called “Chinese jambalaya.”

Le Sia’s busy dining room full of customers and an exposed brick wall Louise Palmberg/Eater

14. Dian Kitchen

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435 E 9th St
New York, NY 10009
(646) 590-9898
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Pickled vegetables and chile oil are made on the premises at this Tompkins Square gem, a Yunnan cafe named after a sylvan lake in the province that offers a wide range of rice noodle dishes. A favorite is a bowl of beef noodles found in Yunnan’s capital of Kunming, flavored with fresh mint and chives, and a salad of cold rice noodles and shredded chicken that makes a perfect summer meal, especially when carried out to the nearby park. Smaller dishes like pan-fried dumplings are also available.

Rrice noodle, chicken, cilantro, scallions, and cucumbers on a ceramic plate Robert Sietsema/Eater

15. MáLà Project

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122 1st Ave
New York, NY 10009
(212) 353-8880
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The name here says it all: Trailing peppercorns, this brick-walled café flew into the East Village in early 2016. It sought to popularize the dry hot pot, by which any combination of ingredients can be selected to be stir-fried with plenty of peppercorns and other flavorings. The menu offers a variety of meats loved in China. There’s an additional location in Midtown.

A wooden bowl with stir fry inside Anthony Bui/Eater

16. Hunan Slurp

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112 1st Avenue
New York, NY 10009
(646) 585-9585
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The East Village has had a spate of stylish Chinese restaurants, and Hunan Slurp perhaps goes harder than any other on creating a sleek, artistic setting covered in blonde wood planks. The food from former artist and owner-chef Chao Wang focuses on his native Hunan. Rice noodles give the restaurant its name, but the other options — like Hunan charcuterie and smoked pork — stand out just as much. 

An artistic dining room with blonde wood slats from floor to ceiling and hanging exposed bulb lights Hunan Slurp [Official Photo]

17. Xi'an Famous Foods

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648 Manhattan Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11222

The original location of this full-on empire opened in Flushing. As its reputation grew, branches started popping up all over the city with its spicy, fragrant style of cooking from northwestern China, inflected with Middle Eastern spices. Try any of the hand-pulled noodles and the spicy cumin lamb burger — the meat is rich and spicy, the bread has a crunchy sear on the outside, and the bun is soft enough inside to soak up plenty of lamb juices.

A man lifting a pile of noodles with chopsticks Nick Solares/Eater

18. Zhen Wei Fang

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207 Bowery
New York, NY 10002
(646) 767-0355
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Ricky Liang, the force behind Congee Village, has given New York a fantastically ambitious and upscale hot pot spot, with individual induction burners for every diner, private karaoke rooms, and A5 Japanese wagyu. Overseeing the kitchen is chef Wei Huang, a Guangdong native who cooks up spicy lobsters with no less skill than the crew at Le Sia. For cheaper selections than the wagyu, consider the hand sliced lamb, gossamer beef tendon, beef short ribs, and silken tofu, all of which pair well with the incendiary Sichuan chile broth.

Diners grabbing for skewers and assorted hotpot items Louise Palmberg/Eater

19. Spicy Village

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68B Forsyth St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 625-8299
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This tiny restaurant owned by Wendy Lian and her family serves some of the most heart-warming and delicious Henan food in Chinatown. Order the big tray of spicy chicken and ask for one or two orders of noodles to toss in the garlicky sauce. They’re hand-pulled, with a hearty bite to them. More can always be ordered, but avoid the soup dumplings, which aren’t a house specialty. Bonus: It’s BYOB.

A big metal bowl with stewed chicken and noodles, topped with a pile of cilantro Eater Video

20. 456 Shanghai Cuisine

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69 Mott St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 964-0003

456 serves some of the city's finest soup dumplings — they're smaller than at places like Joe's or Shanghai Cafe Deluxe, and the dough is super thin. The other essential dish is the platter of fried tiny buns, which are not tiny at all. These buns have chewy skins and juicy dumplings nestled inside. A meal here, from the dim sum items, runs about just $10 per person.

21. Kong Sihk Tong

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65 Bayard St
New York, NY 10013
(646) 850-6140

Chinatown’s stylish Hong Kong cafe covers all the bases when it comes to noodle and rice dishes from China’s southeast coast. From the port city of Xiamen comes a delightful stir fried rice vermicelli rife with ham and other goodies. From Hong Kong itself are the steamed rice dishes called bo zai fan, plus British and American leaning snacks that run from condensed milk toast to spaghetti and meatballs. How about a mug of Horlick’s — a sweet malted milk hot drink — to wash this stuff down?

A plate of stir fried rice vermicelli with ham Robert Sietsema/Eater

22. Fried Dumpling

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106 Mosco St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 693-1060

An offshoot of the first dollar dumpling stall on Allen Street, Fried Dumpling is a closet located on Mosco Street. As the generic name suggests, the menu is as bare bones as can be, offering only a couple of types of fried or steamed dumplings, a hot and sour soup, wedge-shaped sandwiches made with sesame bread, and little else — just the essence of northern Chinese cuisine, which emphasizes wheat over rice. Filling up for less than $5 is doable here.

A woman serves dumplings to a line of customers Gary He/Eater

23. Wo Hop Restaurant

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17 Mott St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 962-8617
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Founded in 1938, Wo Hop is Chinatown’s second oldest restaurant — Nom Wah is the oldest — and the ancient, walk-down premises show it. The waiters wear blue shop coats, and classic Chinese-American fare dominates the menu. Today, the food reads as remarkably healthy (high in vegetables, low in grease), and dishes like chow mein and egg fu yung are really quite delicious.

24. Yun Nan Flavour Garden

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5121 8th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 633-3090
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Yun Nan Flavor Garden is one of the city’s first Yunnan restaurants, an offshoot of a much smaller noodle shop further north in Sunset Park. “Crossing the bridge noodles” is a provincial classic that shouldn’t be missed. Eat it and then Google the story behind it.

25. Chuan Tian Xia

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5502 7th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(929) 295-0128
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New York’s rising standards for Sichuan restaurants hit Sunset Park in 2018 in the form of Chuan Tian Xia, a restaurant bedecked with colorful murals and a backless stools. It immediately became swarmed with families and young people for stellar versions of the cuisine’s classics and a long menu that includes lesser-seen options like spicy frog. Their liangfen, a mung bean noodle here called Chengdu cold noodle, is popular, as is a smoky, spicy cauliflower that arrives at the table in a wok. Get a parchment-steamed whole fish, which imparts a gentle, pleasing heat. Plan to go with a group, and get a reservation; the wait can be long at prime times. 

A white bowl with meat in a spicy sauce and scallions Chuan Tian Xia [Official Photo]

26. Mister Hotpot

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5306 8th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 633-5197
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Servers wear chic suspenders and techno blasts through the speakers at Mister Hotpot, but the space is usually packed with chill families looking for some homey hot pot. Standard ingredients like ultra-thin cut beef or lamb come fresh, and a slew of broth offerings include less traditional options like a tom yum soup. Reservations are recommended, and there’s also a Flushing location.

A table with various hot pot ingredients including sliced raw meat and broths Mister Hotpot [Official Photo]

27. Bamboo Garden

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6409 8th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 238-1122
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Bamboo Garden, Brooklyn’s premier dim sum parlor and one of the best in the city, has reopened after an extensive renovation. Happily, the dim sum is as good as ever, and perhaps even better, with interesting new selections. As they roll by, be sure to choose the mushroom- and egg-filled rice noodle rolls, green chiles stuffed with fish paste, har gow, and shrimp balls.

A lavish dining room with floral carpeting, green chairs, and servers in vested uniforms Robert Sietsema

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1. Atlas Kitchen

258 W 109th St, New York, NY 10025
People eating at white tables in a bright dining room Alex Staniloff/Eater

Located just south of Columbia University, Atlas Kitchen is the most elegant of the new crop of Chinese restaurants appearing south of the campus, patronized by Chinese students and faculty. The bilevel space is decorated with themed murals that inspired the restaurant’s name, and chef Kaiyuan Li cooks food from several regions, including Sichuan, Beijing, Shanghai, and Dongbei, with special focus on his home province of Hunan. A separate section of the menu also presents Chinese-American classics. The beverage program focuses on teas, and for the time being, the restaurant is BYOB. 

258 W 109th St
New York, NY 10025

2. 108 Food- Dried Hot Pot

2794 Broadway, New York, NY 10025
Read Review |
A man pointing at stir-fry ingredients as a worker fills a bowl with his choices Gary He/Eater

This dry hot pot high in Manhattan stands up to any Chinese restaurant in town at a similar price. Here’s how it works at 108 Food: Step up to a lavish display of raw ingredients deposited in metal tubs at the rear of the restaurant. An attendant with a sense of humor, her baseball cap turned askew, will assemble the chosen ingredients, putting the meat, poultry, and fish in one metal bowl, and the vegetable matter in another.

2794 Broadway
New York, NY 10025

3. Friendship Foods BBQ

36-22 Union St, Flushing, NY 11354
Assorted kebabs Robert Sietsema/Eater

Friendship Foods BBQ — located on the northeastern edge of Flushing’s Chinatown — is a favorite of young people in the neighborhood, including high schoolers who might drop by for cumin-dusted kebabs and a hot pot after school. The deep narrow space is club-like, decorated with super-graphics of off road vehicles and whimsical sculptures. While kebabs in the Xinjiang style are a major part of the menu, fried rice and noodles are also available. Seafood and organ meats abound; beer is available. 

36-22 Union St
Flushing, NY 11354

4. You Garden Xiao Long Bao

4107 Bell Blvd, Bayside, NY 11361
Chive and chicken chowder set into a yin and yang shape with green and beige broths Robert Sietsema/Eater

The Eater NY staff believes this Shanghai restaurant in Bayside, Queens serves the best soup dumplings in town. Smaller than usual, they’re thin skinned and bulging with a delicate gravy. With a fuller menu than its Flushing predecessor, it features a full range of Shanghai specialties, including other sorts of dumplings, small plates, noodles, soups, and bigger feeds like braised pork shoulder, sweet and sour sea bass, and eel in hot oil.

4107 Bell Blvd
Bayside, NY 11361

5. Joe’s Steam Rice Roll

136-21 Roosevelt Ave, Flushing, NY 11354
A white styrofoam plate with rice noodle and shrimp rolls Monica Burton/Eater

Joe’s Steam Rice Roll is dedicated to the rice roll, an item that can be ordered at dim sum but executed at a higher level here by Joe Rong. The Flushing gem uses an electric-powered stone mill to make its chang fen, which fills rice-based dough with ingredients such as beef and egg. There’s also a newer location in Manhattan’s Chinatown inside the Canal Street Market.

136-21 Roosevelt Ave
Flushing, NY 11354

6. Szechwan Absolute

39-16 Prince St Ste209, Flushing, NY 11354
Chicken with chiles and dough twists Robert Sietsema/Eater

The third Sichuan restaurant to appear in Flushing’s One Fulton Square retail and residential complex is less lavish and glitzy than the other two, but presents a solid picture of the provincial cuisine with a few turns and twists of its own, plus a plethora of less ubiquitous ingredients and organ meats. Wood ear mushrooms are paired with the firm green vegetable called celtuce, while an amped up version of Chongqing chicken features dough twists. The menu also offers some northern Chinese fare.

39-16 Prince St Ste209
Flushing, NY 11354

7. Lao Bei Fang Dumpling House

83-05 Broadway, Elmhurst, NY 11373
The exterior of Lao Bei Fang, with a red and green awning Robert Sietsema/Eater

This neighborhood favorite in the shadow of the elevated LIRR tracks is wildly popular with the multiple national and cultural groups that inhabit Elmhurst. Simply everyone loves the pot stickers sold here, and lines form around lunch and in the late afternoons. Other offerings run to hand-pulled noodles in soups and congees. It’s serve yourself, and the comfortable dining room encourages lingering.

83-05 Broadway
Elmhurst, NY 11373

8. Hao Noodle

343 W 14th St, New York, NY 10014
Diners in a dining room with flowers and a skylight Robert Sietsema/Eater

Hao Noodle on the edge of the Meatpacking District is the second branch in the city of a Chinese chain headed by veteran restaurateur Zhu Rong. While the first partly focused on Sichuan cuisine from a tea house perspective, this one highlights Shanghai cuisine, and a sideline in small and delicate shish kebabs. The skylit dining room fills with sprays of flowers, making Hao Noodle one of the loveliest restaurants in town.

343 W 14th St
New York, NY 10014

9. Auntie Guan's Kitchen

108 W 14th St, New York, NY
The exterior of Auntie Guan’s Kitchen with a sign that has its name and red lantern lights Robert Sietsema/Eater

The Dongbei cuisine of China’s northeastern province — and that of northern China in general — is presented in more complete form at the 14th Street Auntie Guan’s than Manhattan has seen before. (Previously, going to Flushing was necessary.) Thrill to “green bean sheet jelly,” a smorgasbord of salad ingredients surrounding a heap of clear mung bean noodles; and pork with pickled cabbage, a casserole that seems almost German with its sauerkraut-like fermented cabbage. Plenty of lamb and dumplings are on the menu, too, in addition to Sichuan fare.

108 W 14th St
New York, NY

10. Uluh

152A 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003

Dim sum gets an upscale bent at Uluh Tea House, an East Village newcomer with a sleek space and visually striking presentation. Stunners like a rose lychee panna cotta dessert and a pumpkin custard puff made to look like a plump, squishy orange will be on many of the tables, but the restaurant’s also known for its dumplings and pan-Chinese dishes not typically found on dim sum carts, like Peking duck and pig trotters. As its name suggests, tea is a focus. The selection is wide-ranging, with both leaves ideal for a simple hot cup and trendy, colorful cold options topped with cheese foam. 

152A 2nd Ave
New York, NY 10003

11. Tipsy Shanghai

228 Thompson St, New York, NY 10012
Sauced ribs on a blue and white plate Robert Sietsema/Eater

Practically on the NYU campus, Tipsy Shanghai claims to be related to an actual restaurant in Shanghai founded in 1905. The upbeat interior is decorated with photos of Old Shanghai, bamboo is judiciously used, and the color scheme is red. The signature dish is Wuxi ribs and the dumplings are ably done, but avoid like the plague the separate menu of Chinese-American specialties.

228 Thompson St
New York, NY 10012

12. Szechuan Mountain House

23 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003
Sliced pork belly and cucumber hanging over a device to look like drying laundry, with chile garlic sauce underneath Jean Schwarzwalder/Eater

NYC is a town of superb Sichuan restaurants, and recently, more envelope-pushing versions have opened across the city. Szechuan Mountain House is one such example, expanding from Flushing to the East Village with a second-story St. Mark’s Place location. There are stellar versions of classics like mapo tofu and twice-cooked pork, but also find less ubiquitous fare, including variations on spicy stews. Every table will likely have the sliced pork belly with chile garlic sauce, where pork hangs over a device like laundry on a line. Expect a wait during prime times, and bring a small crew to finish huge portions. 

23 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003

13. Le Sia

8056, 11 E 7th St, New York, NY 10003
Read Review |
Le Sia’s busy dining room full of customers and an exposed brick wall Louise Palmberg/Eater

Shellfish takes center stage at Le Sia, where crawfish, crab, and shrimp come doused in the customer’s choice of six sauces. The most famous of them is “13 flavors,” an umami-rich blend of clove, star anise, angelica dahurica, nutmeg, ginger, fennel, black cardamom, Sichuan peppercorn, dried tangerine peel, cinnamon, and galangal. Get a pound and don the bib and gloves for a full-on seafood feast, buoyed by grilled skewers and a fried rice called “Chinese jambalaya.”

8056, 11 E 7th St
New York, NY 10003

14. Dian Kitchen

435 E 9th St, New York, NY 10009
Rrice noodle, chicken, cilantro, scallions, and cucumbers on a ceramic plate Robert Sietsema/Eater

Pickled vegetables and chile oil are made on the premises at this Tompkins Square gem, a Yunnan cafe named after a sylvan lake in the province that offers a wide range of rice noodle dishes. A favorite is a bowl of beef noodles found in Yunnan’s capital of Kunming, flavored with fresh mint and chives, and a salad of cold rice noodles and shredded chicken that makes a perfect summer meal, especially when carried out to the nearby park. Smaller dishes like pan-fried dumplings are also available.

435 E 9th St
New York, NY 10009

15. MáLà Project

122 1st Ave, New York, NY 10009
A wooden bowl with stir fry inside Anthony Bui/Eater

The name here says it all: Trailing peppercorns, this brick-walled café flew into the East Village in early 2016. It sought to popularize the dry hot pot, by which any combination of ingredients can be selected to be stir-fried with plenty of peppercorns and other flavorings. The menu offers a variety of meats loved in China. There’s an additional location in Midtown.

122 1st Ave
New York, NY 10009

Related Maps

16. Hunan Slurp

112 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10009
An artistic dining room with blonde wood slats from floor to ceiling and hanging exposed bulb lights Hunan Slurp [Official Photo]

The East Village has had a spate of stylish Chinese restaurants, and Hunan Slurp perhaps goes harder than any other on creating a sleek, artistic setting covered in blonde wood planks. The food from former artist and owner-chef Chao Wang focuses on his native Hunan. Rice noodles give the restaurant its name, but the other options — like Hunan charcuterie and smoked pork — stand out just as much. 

112 1st Avenue
New York, NY 10009

17. Xi'an Famous Foods

648 Manhattan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11222
A man lifting a pile of noodles with chopsticks Nick Solares/Eater

The original location of this full-on empire opened in Flushing. As its reputation grew, branches started popping up all over the city with its spicy, fragrant style of cooking from northwestern China, inflected with Middle Eastern spices. Try any of the hand-pulled noodles and the spicy cumin lamb burger — the meat is rich and spicy, the bread has a crunchy sear on the outside, and the bun is soft enough inside to soak up plenty of lamb juices.

648 Manhattan Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11222

18. Zhen Wei Fang

207 Bowery, New York, NY 10002
Read Review |
Diners grabbing for skewers and assorted hotpot items Louise Palmberg/Eater

Ricky Liang, the force behind Congee Village, has given New York a fantastically ambitious and upscale hot pot spot, with individual induction burners for every diner, private karaoke rooms, and A5 Japanese wagyu. Overseeing the kitchen is chef Wei Huang, a Guangdong native who cooks up spicy lobsters with no less skill than the crew at Le Sia. For cheaper selections than the wagyu, consider the hand sliced lamb, gossamer beef tendon, beef short ribs, and silken tofu, all of which pair well with the incendiary Sichuan chile broth.

207 Bowery
New York, NY 10002

19. Spicy Village

68B Forsyth St, New York, NY 10002
A big metal bowl with stewed chicken and noodles, topped with a pile of cilantro Eater Video

This tiny restaurant owned by Wendy Lian and her family serves some of the most heart-warming and delicious Henan food in Chinatown. Order the big tray of spicy chicken and ask for one or two orders of noodles to toss in the garlicky sauce. They’re hand-pulled, with a hearty bite to them. More can always be ordered, but avoid the soup dumplings, which aren’t a house specialty. Bonus: It’s BYOB.

68B Forsyth St
New York, NY 10002

20. 456 Shanghai Cuisine

69 Mott St, New York, NY 10013

456 serves some of the city's finest soup dumplings — they're smaller than at places like Joe's or Shanghai Cafe Deluxe, and the dough is super thin. The other essential dish is the platter of fried tiny buns, which are not tiny at all. These buns have chewy skins and juicy dumplings nestled inside. A meal here, from the dim sum items, runs about just $10 per person.

69 Mott St
New York, NY 10013

21. Kong Sihk Tong

65 Bayard St, New York, NY 10013