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A golden, cylinder-shaped chocolate croissant is photographed diagonally, highlighting the ribbed texture of the pastry and its chocolate interior, visible from the front end
An Italian version of a chocolate croissant at Lodi
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

The Hottest New Bakeries in NYC Right Now

From breads to crullers to tiny croissant cereal

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An Italian version of a chocolate croissant at Lodi
| Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

There’s never been a better time for bakeries in the city, where New Yorkers can get truly amazing breads, decadent pastries, delightful cookies, over-the-top doughnuts, and baked goods representing traditions from around the world.

While the pandemic certainly led us into baking deep dives, the bakery revival has been gaining traction before the return of no-knead bread. In addition to places like Bread Alone (1983) and Sullivan Street (1994), we’ve also seen a more recent push of bakeries that includes Bien Cuit (2011), Dominique Ansel (2013), Mah-Ze-Dahr (2014), and others. Today, bakeries are differentiating from each other in terms of where they’re located; what cultures they represent; whether they’re sweet, savory, or both; how they source grains; their restraint or decadence (we’re talking to you, Supermoon Bakehouse), and even when it comes to bakery design. This collection represents a handful of those we’re excited about that have opened within the year.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Ignacio Mattos’s bakery cafe Lodi opened almost a year ago. Since then, it’s helped define expectations for what’s to come at Rockefeller Center as new restaurants from hot restaurateurs open over the next few months. Sit down at an outside table or order to-go items like porchetta sandwiches, maritozzi, or flauto al cioccolato, an elegant version of a chocolate croissant. Choose from a handful of breads including focaccia, a rustic loaf with a thinner crust, another made from farro, as well as one that sports malted grains. They’re on display beside meats, cheeses, and antipasti on the all-day menu as well.

Patrons dine under umbrellas at Lodi, one of whom is petting a small dog.
The exterior of Lodi in Rockefeller Center.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

About a half-hour before Lysée in Flatiron opens, folks line up down the block for a coveted table at this museum-like French Korean pastry shop. Eunji Lee, formerly head pastry chef at the two-Michelin-starred Jungsik, has a certified hit on her hands, and the good news is that the wait for takeout sweets is often quite short. Lee makes preternaturally light kouign amanns with French butter, aromatic milk chocolate banana cookies, yuja-flavored pound cakes, black sesame shortbread cookies, and a variety of more artistic, eye-catching fare. Just as Lee sold a trompe l’oeil banana — it wasn’t really a banana — at Jungsik, she disguises grilled corn cream and corn mousse at Lysée as an actual corn on the cob of sorts. It takes three days to make and costs nearly $20.

A white bowl holds a round dessert that looks like corn on the cob. In the background a box that says Lysee stands.
The corn at Lysée
Dan Ahn/Lysée

Smør Bakery

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The breads and pastries were always such a welcome addition to any regular Smør order that it seemed like only a matter of time for the team behind the laid-back Scandinavian restaurant to expand those sections of the menu into its own full-blown business. Head to Smør’s next-door bakery to load up on hearty loaves of rugbrod, fragrant cardamom buns, fluffy egg sandwiches, and toasts piled high with avocados and tomatoes.

La Cabra

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The slick East Village coffee bar is a Danish import where a barista waits for you at the end of the solemn room like a priest about to hear your confession, offering spectacular coffee and a handful of pastries from a shifting roster. The default if you’re feeling hungry is a bread service with plenty of high-fat butter, but you may also go for, say, a croissant or sesame croissant baked stylishly dark or a caradamom-scented sweet roll.

Three dark pastries on a plate.
A selection of pastries from La Cabra.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Lady Wong Pastry & Kuih

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The East Village has no shortage of hot, new bakeries (see also: multiple other spots on this list) but Lady Wong may have generated the longest line of them all when it first opened on East 9th Street earlier this year. The Southeast Asian pastry and dessert shop, run by co-owners and married couple Mogan Anthony and Seleste Tan, stocks vibrant kuih — don’t miss the seri muka, with thick pandan custard set on top of a bed of blue and white sticky rice — alongside tarts, cake slices, and a durian roll cake that has its own following.

Three tall, rectangular cubes of seri muka with green pandan custard and blue and white sticky rice arranged on a banana leaf.
Seri muka from Lady Wong.
Dan Ahn/Eater NY

Librae Bakery

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A bakery with “Middle Eastern roots and Danish technique,” Librae brings chai shortbread, strawberry sumac Linzer cookies, za’atar labneh morning buns, focaccia, croissants, and more to Cooper Square. The place comes from Dona Murad, a Bahraini coffee roaster, and partner Andre Gerschel, who worked in restaurant management in the U.K. and the Persian Gulf. With their combination of heritages — Bahraini, Persian, Indian, and Moroccan — they call this a third-culture bakery.

Tin Building by Jean-Georges

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The Tin Building’s L-shaped pastry counter is found right inside the South Street main entrance on the first floor, and its selection makes an attempt to satisfy the sweet tooth of an entire city. Yes, there are cookies and buttercream-topped cupcakes, but also find a selection of Paris-Brest pastries, opulent layer cakes heaped with fruit, assorted tarts, some rather plain-looking pies, and even moon pies covered in chocolate. Adjacent is a bread bakery offering baguettes, multigrain sourdough boules, danishes, and croissants.

A selection of colorful fruit topped layer cakes.
Layer cakes are a specialty at the Tin Building’s bakery.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

L'Appartement 4F

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This French-leaning bakery that started as a pandemic project is now a stylish standalone venture in Brooklyn Heights, of all places, that opened in May. Here, software-designer-turned-baker Gautier Coiffard and his partner Ashley have opened a spot that provides items like plain croissants, pain au chocolat, almond croissants stuffed with various things, ham-and-cheese croissants, and those dressed with everything bagel seasoning. You’ll also find breads and cookies. But the novelty here is a croissant cereal for $50, for which “each tiny croissant is hand rolled, baked, dipped in our original simple syrup infused with cinnamon and then dehydrated,” reads the website. “Perfect for a special breakfast or a chic snack.”

Bạn Bè

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Bạn Bè, a rare Vietnamese bakery that opened in July from Doris Ho-Kane, goes beyond its popular cookie tins to sell Vietnamese iced coffee, pandan coconut waffles, and Việt cassava cake with an agar jelly flower. Look for new hours listed on Instagram after September 10.

The exterior of Bạn Bè, a Vietnamese bakery in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.
The exterior of Bạn Bè, a Vietnamese bakery in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Otway Bakery

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There are no seats at Samantha Safer’s Otway Bakery, a spinoff of the namesake restaurant in Clinton Hill. Yet the space is still inviting with its blonde wood, plenty of plants, and relaxed vibe. If you get here early enough, you’ll find an array of pastries from croissants, pain au chocolat, cinnamon buns, Swedish cardamom bun, and more — but be sure not to miss the flaky and light crullers. Wednesday through Sunday you’ll also find country loaves and some baguettes, too.

A plain, doughnut-shaped, sugar-glazed cruller sits on a patterned yellow and white plate atop a marble counter.
A doughnut-shaped, sugar-glazed cruller from Otway Bakery.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

Patti Ann's Bakery

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The bakery around the corner from Patti Ann’s — the homage to owner owner Greg Baxtrom’s mother — features baguettes, country loaves, and focaccia among savory items and a longer list of sweet treats that feel more complementary to the restaurant, from gluten-free chocolate pudding cake to a maple cruller and a banana cream puff.

A blue table with paper place mats is filled with a bread basket, blooming onion, and other comfort dishes in matching blue bowls.
The bread basket at Patti Ann’s comes from the next-door bakery, also owned by Greg Baxtrom.
Noah Fecks/Patti Ann’s

Lodi

Patrons dine under umbrellas at Lodi, one of whom is petting a small dog.
The exterior of Lodi in Rockefeller Center.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Ignacio Mattos’s bakery cafe Lodi opened almost a year ago. Since then, it’s helped define expectations for what’s to come at Rockefeller Center as new restaurants from hot restaurateurs open over the next few months. Sit down at an outside table or order to-go items like porchetta sandwiches, maritozzi, or flauto al cioccolato, an elegant version of a chocolate croissant. Choose from a handful of breads including focaccia, a rustic loaf with a thinner crust, another made from farro, as well as one that sports malted grains. They’re on display beside meats, cheeses, and antipasti on the all-day menu as well.

Patrons dine under umbrellas at Lodi, one of whom is petting a small dog.
The exterior of Lodi in Rockefeller Center.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Lysée

A white bowl holds a round dessert that looks like corn on the cob. In the background a box that says Lysee stands.
The corn at Lysée
Dan Ahn/Lysée

About a half-hour before Lysée in Flatiron opens, folks line up down the block for a coveted table at this museum-like French Korean pastry shop. Eunji Lee, formerly head pastry chef at the two-Michelin-starred Jungsik, has a certified hit on her hands, and the good news is that the wait for takeout sweets is often quite short. Lee makes preternaturally light kouign amanns with French butter, aromatic milk chocolate banana cookies, yuja-flavored pound cakes, black sesame shortbread cookies, and a variety of more artistic, eye-catching fare. Just as Lee sold a trompe l’oeil banana — it wasn’t really a banana — at Jungsik, she disguises grilled corn cream and corn mousse at Lysée as an actual corn on the cob of sorts. It takes three days to make and costs nearly $20.

A white bowl holds a round dessert that looks like corn on the cob. In the background a box that says Lysee stands.
The corn at Lysée
Dan Ahn/Lysée

Smør Bakery

The breads and pastries were always such a welcome addition to any regular Smør order that it seemed like only a matter of time for the team behind the laid-back Scandinavian restaurant to expand those sections of the menu into its own full-blown business. Head to Smør’s next-door bakery to load up on hearty loaves of rugbrod, fragrant cardamom buns, fluffy egg sandwiches, and toasts piled high with avocados and tomatoes.

La Cabra

Three dark pastries on a plate.
A selection of pastries from La Cabra.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The slick East Village coffee bar is a Danish import where a barista waits for you at the end of the solemn room like a priest about to hear your confession, offering spectacular coffee and a handful of pastries from a shifting roster. The default if you’re feeling hungry is a bread service with plenty of high-fat butter, but you may also go for, say, a croissant or sesame croissant baked stylishly dark or a caradamom-scented sweet roll.

Three dark pastries on a plate.
A selection of pastries from La Cabra.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Lady Wong Pastry & Kuih

Three tall, rectangular cubes of seri muka with green pandan custard and blue and white sticky rice arranged on a banana leaf.
Seri muka from Lady Wong.
Dan Ahn/Eater NY

The East Village has no shortage of hot, new bakeries (see also: multiple other spots on this list) but Lady Wong may have generated the longest line of them all when it first opened on East 9th Street earlier this year. The Southeast Asian pastry and dessert shop, run by co-owners and married couple Mogan Anthony and Seleste Tan, stocks vibrant kuih — don’t miss the seri muka, with thick pandan custard set on top of a bed of blue and white sticky rice — alongside tarts, cake slices, and a durian roll cake that has its own following.

Three tall, rectangular cubes of seri muka with green pandan custard and blue and white sticky rice arranged on a banana leaf.
Seri muka from Lady Wong.
Dan Ahn/Eater NY

Librae Bakery

A bakery with “Middle Eastern roots and Danish technique,” Librae brings chai shortbread, strawberry sumac Linzer cookies, za’atar labneh morning buns, focaccia, croissants, and more to Cooper Square. The place comes from Dona Murad, a Bahraini coffee roaster, and partner Andre Gerschel, who worked in restaurant management in the U.K. and the Persian Gulf. With their combination of heritages — Bahraini, Persian, Indian, and Moroccan — they call this a third-culture bakery.

Tin Building by Jean-Georges

A selection of colorful fruit topped layer cakes.
Layer cakes are a specialty at the Tin Building’s bakery.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Tin Building’s L-shaped pastry counter is found right inside the South Street main entrance on the first floor, and its selection makes an attempt to satisfy the sweet tooth of an entire city. Yes, there are cookies and buttercream-topped cupcakes, but also find a selection of Paris-Brest pastries, opulent layer cakes heaped with fruit, assorted tarts, some rather plain-looking pies, and even moon pies covered in chocolate. Adjacent is a bread bakery offering baguettes, multigrain sourdough boules, danishes, and croissants.

A selection of colorful fruit topped layer cakes.
Layer cakes are a specialty at the Tin Building’s bakery.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

L'Appartement 4F

This French-leaning bakery that started as a pandemic project is now a stylish standalone venture in Brooklyn Heights, of all places, that opened in May. Here, software-designer-turned-baker Gautier Coiffard and his partner Ashley have opened a spot that provides items like plain croissants, pain au chocolat, almond croissants stuffed with various things, ham-and-cheese croissants, and those dressed with everything bagel seasoning. You’ll also find breads and cookies. But the novelty here is a croissant cereal for $50, for which “each tiny croissant is hand rolled, baked, dipped in our original simple syrup infused with cinnamon and then dehydrated,” reads the website. “Perfect for a special breakfast or a chic snack.”

Bạn Bè

The exterior of Bạn Bè, a Vietnamese bakery in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.
The exterior of Bạn Bè, a Vietnamese bakery in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Bạn Bè, a rare Vietnamese bakery that opened in July from Doris Ho-Kane, goes beyond its popular cookie tins to sell Vietnamese iced coffee, pandan coconut waffles, and Việt cassava cake with an agar jelly flower. Look for new hours listed on Instagram after September 10.

The exterior of Bạn Bè, a Vietnamese bakery in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.
The exterior of Bạn Bè, a Vietnamese bakery in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Otway Bakery

A plain, doughnut-shaped, sugar-glazed cruller sits on a patterned yellow and white plate atop a marble counter.
A doughnut-shaped, sugar-glazed cruller from Otway Bakery.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

There are no seats at Samantha Safer’s Otway Bakery, a spinoff of the namesake restaurant in Clinton Hill. Yet the space is still inviting with its blonde wood, plenty of plants, and relaxed vibe. If you get here early enough, you’ll find an array of pastries from croissants, pain au chocolat, cinnamon buns, Swedish cardamom bun, and more — but be sure not to miss the flaky and light crullers. Wednesday through Sunday you’ll also find country loaves and some baguettes, too.

A plain, doughnut-shaped, sugar-glazed cruller sits on a patterned yellow and white plate atop a marble counter.
A doughnut-shaped, sugar-glazed cruller from Otway Bakery.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

Patti Ann's Bakery

A blue table with paper place mats is filled with a bread basket, blooming onion, and other comfort dishes in matching blue bowls.
The bread basket at Patti Ann’s comes from the next-door bakery, also owned by Greg Baxtrom.
Noah Fecks/Patti Ann’s

The bakery around the corner from Patti Ann’s — the homage to owner owner Greg Baxtrom’s mother — features baguettes, country loaves, and focaccia among savory items and a longer list of sweet treats that feel more complementary to the restaurant, from gluten-free chocolate pudding cake to a maple cruller and a banana cream puff.

A blue table with paper place mats is filled with a bread basket, blooming onion, and other comfort dishes in matching blue bowls.
The bread basket at Patti Ann’s comes from the next-door bakery, also owned by Greg Baxtrom.
Noah Fecks/Patti Ann’s

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