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Introducing the Wine Heatmap: Where to Drink Now

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12342008_10_hasmaps.jpgWith the help of the Eater 38 and the Eater Heatmaps, it's a breeze to find out where to eat right now, whether it's a hot newcomer or an old neighborhood standby. The Cocktail Heatmap is a go-to source for information on the hot cocktail dens of the moment. And now it's just as easy to find out where to drink wine in this city.

Welcome to the first-ever Eater Wine Heatmap, a guide to New York bars and restaurants with exciting and/or noteworthy wine programs. Rather than feature the perennial favorites, this guide focuses on operations that have opened in the last year or two or recently underwent a revamp. Happy sipping, and as always, feel free to write in with new suggestions.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Corkbuzz

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13 E 13th St
New York, NY 10003
(646) 873-6071
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The Champagne Campaign (every bottle of bubbles is offered at half price from 10 p.m. till close, every night) has made this popular venue into a late night who’s who of wine drinkers, with sommeliers and winos of all stripes looking for a seat at the bar. Want to try several different wines? That’s easy. The patrons assembled here are usually happy to share a taste from whatever bottle they might be drinking down.

2. Maison Premiere

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298 Bedford Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(347) 335-0446
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The high acid cut of the wines on the list is well tailored to the oysters on the menu, so there is little chance of a bad pairing. The selections also match the room, which is distinctly old time classic, but still decidedly comfortable. Add in the emphasis on the many choices that drink better than they cost, and you have a win-win wine proposition.

3. L'Apicio

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13 E 1st St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 533-7400
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The wine list is a mixture of country wines from Italy and the young guns from California, served to a crowd that is as comfortable in plaid as in Prada. You have many options here if you are curious to explore around the outer fringe of the wine world, but also choices to fall back on if you aren’t. Either way, you’ll be in good company.

4. Reynard at Wythe Hotel

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80 Wythe Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 460-8000
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It is hard when picking wine here to get past the extensive, well-priced and well chosen “Les Bulles” (Bubbles) section, but if you do you’ll be further rewarded with just about every manner of delicious, thirst quenching country wine from France. If you want to explore past the classic (and expensive) French wine regions, there is no better place to start than at Reynard.

5. Terroir Park Slope

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284 5th Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11215

Like all of the Terroir locations, this is a by-the-glass star. There's a lot to choose from by the glass, and most, if not all of the selections (hey, there is a lot of Bordeaux!) fall under the Gonzo Paul Grieco rubric. Plus the bottle list runs particularly long, so however you’d like to approach it, Park Slope has gained a major wine hang.

6. The Beagle

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162 Ave A
New York, NY 10009
(212) 228-6900
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The revamp of The Beagle offers you any style of wine you’d like, as long as it is sherry wine. The sherry focus runs deep here, and spills over into the cocktails as well. If you want to sample from some of the best bodegas there are certainly plenty of opportunities to do so here.

7. North End Grill

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104 N End Ave.
New York, NY 10282
(646) 747-1600
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Here you will find a well-thought out list that offers a bit of something for everyone. And as this is a Danny Meyer operation there are certain wines, such as those by Boxler, Dirler, Quintarelli, Poggio di Sotto, and others that are from vintages more mature than their cost might imply.

8. aska

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90 Wythe Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211

Although the wine by the glass selection is attenuated, the full bottle list offers a diverse array of choices, sourced from all over the globe. Mature options abound, and some thought has obviously been given to finding wines with age on them. Certain categories, like German Riesling and Cru Beaujolais, get special treatment in sections all to themselves.

9. Ichimura at Brushstroke

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30 Hudson St.
New York, NY 10013
(212) 513-7141

Sake shares space with wine on this menu, but the large size of the list means that there is room for everyone. There is a broad range of options to pair with every kind of fish, whether it is fluke, mackerel, or tuna. The prices might be a little more kind, but you will almost certainly drink well, whatever you choose.

10. The Marrow

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99 Bank St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 428-6000
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Yes, there are certain head scratchers (why the attempt to have every German Riesling from 2011?) but the breadth and general quality of the selection makes up for those, while an obvious effort has been made to find wines with age on them from most parts of the world. In the era of the small wine list, it is refreshing to find a just opened restaurant that is making the space for a wine program of this size.

11. Hillside

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70 Hudson Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 522-7957
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“Wow, what’s that wine? I’ve never had one of those before” is something you might hear a lot at Hillside, the new addition from the team behind Vinegar Hill House. Certainly it is an eclectic selection, but super well chosen, and if you are tired of the same old, same old then you shouldn’t wait any longer to have a glass at the bar.

12. Alison Eighteen

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15 W 18th St
New York, NY 10011
(212) 366-1818
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Several years ago lists like this one were common, but now it is nothing less than comforting to see a commitment to wines from the classic regions (White Bordeaux!) when it seems like every other new restaurant is rushing headlong towards the hip, or trying to forget about wine altogether. And while it focuses on the classics, the Alison Eighteen list also traffics in the less expensive bottlings, which is a combination that has become all too rare.

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1. Corkbuzz

13 E 13th St, New York, NY 10003

The Champagne Campaign (every bottle of bubbles is offered at half price from 10 p.m. till close, every night) has made this popular venue into a late night who’s who of wine drinkers, with sommeliers and winos of all stripes looking for a seat at the bar. Want to try several different wines? That’s easy. The patrons assembled here are usually happy to share a taste from whatever bottle they might be drinking down.

13 E 13th St
New York, NY 10003

2. Maison Premiere

298 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11211

The high acid cut of the wines on the list is well tailored to the oysters on the menu, so there is little chance of a bad pairing. The selections also match the room, which is distinctly old time classic, but still decidedly comfortable. Add in the emphasis on the many choices that drink better than they cost, and you have a win-win wine proposition.

298 Bedford Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11211

3. L'Apicio

13 E 1st St, New York, NY 10003

The wine list is a mixture of country wines from Italy and the young guns from California, served to a crowd that is as comfortable in plaid as in Prada. You have many options here if you are curious to explore around the outer fringe of the wine world, but also choices to fall back on if you aren’t. Either way, you’ll be in good company.

13 E 1st St
New York, NY 10003

4. Reynard at Wythe Hotel

80 Wythe Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11211

It is hard when picking wine here to get past the extensive, well-priced and well chosen “Les Bulles” (Bubbles) section, but if you do you’ll be further rewarded with just about every manner of delicious, thirst quenching country wine from France. If you want to explore past the classic (and expensive) French wine regions, there is no better place to start than at Reynard.

80 Wythe Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11211

5. Terroir Park Slope

284 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11215

Like all of the Terroir locations, this is a by-the-glass star. There's a lot to choose from by the glass, and most, if not all of the selections (hey, there is a lot of Bordeaux!) fall under the Gonzo Paul Grieco rubric. Plus the bottle list runs particularly long, so however you’d like to approach it, Park Slope has gained a major wine hang.

284 5th Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11215

6. The Beagle

162 Ave A, New York, NY 10009

The revamp of The Beagle offers you any style of wine you’d like, as long as it is sherry wine. The sherry focus runs deep here, and spills over into the cocktails as well. If you want to sample from some of the best bodegas there are certainly plenty of opportunities to do so here.

162 Ave A
New York, NY 10009

7. North End Grill

104 N End Ave., New York, NY 10282

Here you will find a well-thought out list that offers a bit of something for everyone. And as this is a Danny Meyer operation there are certain wines, such as those by Boxler, Dirler, Quintarelli, Poggio di Sotto, and others that are from vintages more mature than their cost might imply.

104 N End Ave.
New York, NY 10282

8. aska

90 Wythe Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211

Although the wine by the glass selection is attenuated, the full bottle list offers a diverse array of choices, sourced from all over the globe. Mature options abound, and some thought has obviously been given to finding wines with age on them. Certain categories, like German Riesling and Cru Beaujolais, get special treatment in sections all to themselves.

90 Wythe Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211

9. Ichimura at Brushstroke

30 Hudson St., New York, NY 10013

Sake shares space with wine on this menu, but the large size of the list means that there is room for everyone. There is a broad range of options to pair with every kind of fish, whether it is fluke, mackerel, or tuna. The prices might be a little more kind, but you will almost certainly drink well, whatever you choose.

30 Hudson St.
New York, NY 10013

10. The Marrow

99 Bank St, New York, NY 10014

Yes, there are certain head scratchers (why the attempt to have every German Riesling from 2011?) but the breadth and general quality of the selection makes up for those, while an obvious effort has been made to find wines with age on them from most parts of the world. In the era of the small wine list, it is refreshing to find a just opened restaurant that is making the space for a wine program of this size.

99 Bank St
New York, NY 10014

11. Hillside

70 Hudson Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11201

“Wow, what’s that wine? I’ve never had one of those before” is something you might hear a lot at Hillside, the new addition from the team behind Vinegar Hill House. Certainly it is an eclectic selection, but super well chosen, and if you are tired of the same old, same old then you shouldn’t wait any longer to have a glass at the bar.

70 Hudson Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11201

12. Alison Eighteen

15 W 18th St, New York, NY 10011

Several years ago lists like this one were common, but now it is nothing less than comforting to see a commitment to wines from the classic regions (White Bordeaux!) when it seems like every other new restaurant is rushing headlong towards the hip, or trying to forget about wine altogether. And while it focuses on the classics, the Alison Eighteen list also traffics in the less expensive bottlings, which is a combination that has become all too rare.

15 W 18th St
New York, NY 10011

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