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Where to Eat and Drink in Hudson and Hyde Park

Beat the heat in the Hudson Valley

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Sure Blue Hill at Stone Barns is the most recognizable destination dining north of the city. But the towns beyond hold their own appeal. Take Hudson and Hyde Park a daytrip away, both of which offer charming spots to graze, shop, and explore.

With NYC transplants like Zak Pelaccio setting up in Hudson to open Fish & Game along with Hyde Park the anchor for the Culinary School of America, the region has long been taking shape as destination-worthy, luring weekenders with cozy inns, barrrooms, coffee shops, and restaurants. Read on for new and reliable places to eat and drink in Hudson and Hyde Park.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Wm. Farmer & Sons Barroom

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This family-run place offers lunch Wednesday through Sunday, dinner, and a place to stay. With a menu of oysters or pickles for small plates, burrata salad, pork terrine or a ham board among starters, and quail, steak, duck confit, and burgers for entrees, it’s a New American casual spot with a fine cocktail menu.

Wm Farmer & Sons

Fish & Game

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James Beard-nominated formerly of Fatty Crab and others, Zak Pelaccio helms his American tavern with attention to local ingredients that he opened here in 2013. Start with dishes like roasted snails, move into sugarsnaps with garlic and herbs, and go for a whole roasted chicken with morels, now in season.

Zak Pelaccio

Swoon Kitchenbar

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Swoon Kitchenbar is one of the OGs of Hudson, having opened here in the mid-2000s. With whitewashed tin ceilings, tile floors, and a handsome bar, the restaurant can serve as a special occasion spot as well as a wine bar. Look for seasonal dishes and snacks like terrines, rillettes, and pates and well as dishes like skirt steak or slow-roasted veal.

Swoon Kitchenbar

American Glory

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For a range of barbecue as well as chili, there’s American Glory set in a former firehouse. The place doesn’t embrace regional loyalty, so it offers North Carolina-style pulled pork as well as Texas-inspired brisket on a menu of sandwiches, platters and share plates, with sides like baked beans and bacon, pickled red cabbage, and collards. There’s a wide selection of whiskey and the place can accommodate a crowd.

American Glory

Backbar

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This sibling to Fish & Game, Backbar is a bar and patio-seating, no-reservations casual spot open from noon to at least midnight. Look for dishes like pork belly satay, sweet potato curry, fried chicken, ma po tofu, spicy cucumbers, and more.

Backbar

Spotty Dog Books & Ale

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Consider snacks like local and imported cheeses, empanadas, or marinated olives to eat with a glass of wine or local craft brew at this indie bookstore in Hudson that’s open til 8 or 9 p.m.

Aeble Restaurant

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Neighborhood restaurant Aeble opened for dinner and brunch in March from Anna Utevsky and chef Charlie Brassard who worked under Bill Telepan. Look for dishes like roasted carrot and radish salad, pork chops, and trout with sunchokes in a laid-back dining room with plenty of country vibes.

The Crimson Sparrow

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WD-50 alum and co-owner John McCarthy has paired French technique, local ingredients, and a love of Asian flavors at his restaurant that also features a deep sake selection. The tasting menu is $95, with dishes like smoked clams, cucumber, tatsoi with sake and wine parings, while a la carte offerings include ramen, Korean fried chicken, and smoked duck with fermented black beans and edamame.

Crimson Sparrow

The Bocuse Restaurant at the Culinary Institute of America

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Named after the culinary giant from Lyon, Paul Bocuse, the on-campus restaurant at the Culinary Institute of America is student-run, featuring classic French cuisine through the lens of more modern cooking techniques. Look for dishes like the black truffle soup VGE, spring asparagus soup, guinea hen fricassée, and an elaborate pastry program that includes ice cream hand-cranked tableside.

CIA photo

Post Road Brew House at the Culinary Institute of America

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Having opened in February, Post Road Brew House shows off eight draught beers, the result of the school’s collaborations with Brooklyn Brewery and other New York-based brewers. On the menu, look for dishes like the deviled eggs, reuben sandwich, burgers, and cassoulet, as well as fish and chips.

Culinary Institute of America

Wm. Farmer & Sons Barroom

Wm Farmer & Sons

This family-run place offers lunch Wednesday through Sunday, dinner, and a place to stay. With a menu of oysters or pickles for small plates, burrata salad, pork terrine or a ham board among starters, and quail, steak, duck confit, and burgers for entrees, it’s a New American casual spot with a fine cocktail menu.

Wm Farmer & Sons

Fish & Game

Zak Pelaccio

James Beard-nominated formerly of Fatty Crab and others, Zak Pelaccio helms his American tavern with attention to local ingredients that he opened here in 2013. Start with dishes like roasted snails, move into sugarsnaps with garlic and herbs, and go for a whole roasted chicken with morels, now in season.

Zak Pelaccio

Swoon Kitchenbar

Swoon Kitchenbar

Swoon Kitchenbar is one of the OGs of Hudson, having opened here in the mid-2000s. With whitewashed tin ceilings, tile floors, and a handsome bar, the restaurant can serve as a special occasion spot as well as a wine bar. Look for seasonal dishes and snacks like terrines, rillettes, and pates and well as dishes like skirt steak or slow-roasted veal.

Swoon Kitchenbar

American Glory

American Glory

For a range of barbecue as well as chili, there’s American Glory set in a former firehouse. The place doesn’t embrace regional loyalty, so it offers North Carolina-style pulled pork as well as Texas-inspired brisket on a menu of sandwiches, platters and share plates, with sides like baked beans and bacon, pickled red cabbage, and collards. There’s a wide selection of whiskey and the place can accommodate a crowd.

American Glory

Backbar

Backbar

This sibling to Fish & Game, Backbar is a bar and patio-seating, no-reservations casual spot open from noon to at least midnight. Look for dishes like pork belly satay, sweet potato curry, fried chicken, ma po tofu, spicy cucumbers, and more.

Backbar

Spotty Dog Books & Ale

Consider snacks like local and imported cheeses, empanadas, or marinated olives to eat with a glass of wine or local craft brew at this indie bookstore in Hudson that’s open til 8 or 9 p.m.

Aeble Restaurant

Neighborhood restaurant Aeble opened for dinner and brunch in March from Anna Utevsky and chef Charlie Brassard who worked under Bill Telepan. Look for dishes like roasted carrot and radish salad, pork chops, and trout with sunchokes in a laid-back dining room with plenty of country vibes.

The Crimson Sparrow

Crimson Sparrow

WD-50 alum and co-owner John McCarthy has paired French technique, local ingredients, and a love of Asian flavors at his restaurant that also features a deep sake selection. The tasting menu is $95, with dishes like smoked clams, cucumber, tatsoi with sake and wine parings, while a la carte offerings include ramen, Korean fried chicken, and smoked duck with fermented black beans and edamame.

Crimson Sparrow

The Bocuse Restaurant at the Culinary Institute of America

CIA photo

Named after the culinary giant from Lyon, Paul Bocuse, the on-campus restaurant at the Culinary Institute of America is student-run, featuring classic French cuisine through the lens of more modern cooking techniques. Look for dishes like the black truffle soup VGE, spring asparagus soup, guinea hen fricassée, and an elaborate pastry program that includes ice cream hand-cranked tableside.

CIA photo

Post Road Brew House at the Culinary Institute of America

Culinary Institute of America

Having opened in February, Post Road Brew House shows off eight draught beers, the result of the school’s collaborations with Brooklyn Brewery and other New York-based brewers. On the menu, look for dishes like the deviled eggs, reuben sandwich, burgers, and cassoulet, as well as fish and chips.

Culinary Institute of America

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