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A bowl of pho from Chinatown’s Pho Bar
A bowl of pho from Chinatown’s Pho Bar
Pho Bar [Official Photo]

The 15 NYC Restaurants Working to Fight Hunger

These restaurants are donating 5 percent of sales to Food Bank For New York City for a limited time

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A bowl of pho from Chinatown’s Pho Bar
| Pho Bar [Official Photo]

Each spring Food Bank For New York City holds a weeklong restaurant campaign that allows local restaurants and its patrons to get involved in the fight against hunger. Eater is excited to partner with Food Bank and its efforts in this year’s campaign: Eat for Good — running from March 18 to March 24.

During the weeklong campaign, restaurants participating in Eat for Good will donate 5 percent of sales to Food Bank’s mission. On this map are some Eater-approved places to visit all week long. If you’re a restaurant owner and would like to get involved in this year’s campaign, there’s still time to sign up.

Disclosure: Eater is Food Bank For New York City’s promotional partner for Eat for Good. Eater’s editor-in-chief Amanda Kludt is on the culinary council at Food Bank.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Pop & Pour

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Steps from the Dyckman Street subway station is this eclectic cafe and wine bar, where the menu pulls inspiration from Latin America and the States. Diners will find Inwood’s most exciting wine and craft beer selection here.

Harlem Shake

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Diner-like digs and items abound at Harlem Shake, where the move at this uptown spot is fries, a shake, and either a hot dog or burger — of which the classic “company burger” is best.

Three hot dogs in buns sit side by side atop a green and white checker board paper on a blue tray Harlem Shake/Facebook

Infamous Bistro

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Set across St. John the Divine, Infamous Bistro is the next-door sister to Marlow Bistro, where diners will find the same neighborhood vibes and thoughtful menu options like roast chicken, lamb meatballs, a brisket burger, and ricotta ravioli. Plus, drinks here come from an Employees Only vet.

Sunnyside’s Quaint has gained its neighborhood following for consistently delivering classic, unfussy, bistro-style comfort food and coupling it with a welcoming staff. Quaint is a solid choice if you want to dine before a flight out of LaGuardia Airport and are decidedly avoiding the airport’s onsite options.

Quaint Quaint [Official Photo]

It’s best to bring a group to Zauo, the restaurant where diners fish for their dinner. This way there are more chances to try the restaurant’s appetizers and side dishes, in addition to the fish which is available four ways: sake-steamed, salt grilled, simmered in soy sauce, or tempura fried. Note: This is not the place to go for a quiet dinner, with staffers banging on drums each time a fish is caught.

Petite Boucherie

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It’s somewhat surprising that the sprawling Sheridan Square brasserie called Boucherie could spawn sush a romantic French Bistro a couple blocks away. Petite Boucherie’s menu reads like that of the former Pastis, with lots of meat and seafood, along with the usual charcuterie, salads, and pastas, and a drinks menu that favors absinthe.

Petite Boucherie [Official Photo]

Ribalta

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Little known fact is that the pizzas coming from master pizzaiolo Pasquale Cozzolino at Ribalta are VPN-certified, meaning that the Verace Pizza Napoletana Association — an Italian organization that certifies restaurants — has signed off on Ribalta’s employment of wood-fired ovens and its use of standardized ingredients of Neapolitan origin like 00 flour, San Marzano tomatoes, and buffalo mozzarella. All that said, Ribalta is a given when searching for that iconic, chewy Neapolitan pizza crust around New York.

Ribalta Ribalta [Official Photo]

Paulie Gee's

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Owner Paul Giannone is known for using creative toppings at this Greenpoint pizzeria favorite. Speciality pizzas like the sopressata honey hellboy, which includes Mike’s Hot Honey for some kick, shouldn’t be missed. Plus, those avoiding dairy can revel in Paulie’s many vegan pizza and dessert options.

Pinch Chinese

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Soup dumplings and an excellent wine list are the winning combo at Pinch Chinese in Soho, where dishes like Peking duck and dan dan noodles are also worth a try. Come for dumpling and drink deals during a daily happy hour that ends at 7 p.m.

Pinch Chinese Pinch Chinese/Facebook

Houseman

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Everyone from an Eater staffer’s dad to New York Times critic Pete Wells is enamored with the chicken at Ned Baldwin’s Houseman in Hudson Square. The chicken is on a list of Houseman favorites alongside the steak frites, smoked duck, the burger, and whatever is for dessert that day.

A grey awning stretches out over a New York City sidewalk, with the word “Houseman” in white Nick Solares

Frankie Goes to Bollywood

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The frankie — grilled flatbread enclosing fillings like spiced cauliflower and potato; tandoor chicken; and braised lamb with yogurt — is a Mumbai street food favorite. It was somewhat rare to find the dish in New York, until Frankie Goes to Bollywood opened last fall in Soho. The fast-casual shop also specializes in pakoras (chickpea-battered fritters), and chana masala (curried chickpeas) served with chips.

Frankie Goes To Bollywood Frankie Goes To Bollywood/Facebook

Grotta Azzurra

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This true Little Italy institution remains though the storefronts around it are ever-changing. Probably because locals know they can find excellent zuppa di clams, unfussy gnocchi, and warming bolognese any night of the week.

Grotta Azzurra Grotta Azzurra [Official Photo]

Pho Bar

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The soup oracles at Pho Bar (styled PhoBar) offer more than 10 varieties of the Vietnamese staple, including a spicy beef pho, oxtail pho with beef broth, and a vegetarian pho with carrots and daikon. Note: Only the Chinatown location of Pho Bar is participating in Eat for Good.

Pho Bar Pho Bar [Official Photo]

La Cafette

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La Cafette in Williamsburg has all the cute restaurant makings like neon signs, decorative plate ware, and botanical wallpaper; but it also has the standout French bistro classics to back it up. Craveable dishes here include the buttery escargots, hanger steak frites, roast chicken with potatoes, and steak tartare.

La Cafette La Cafette/Facebook

La Vigna

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Giussepe Vitale, a veteran of Lidia Bastianich’s kitchen, opened La Vigna as his own in the heart of Forest Hills. The heavily local restaurant doesn’t offer a bad risotto or pasta; plus there are pre-fixe options — two courses with coffee or tea — for both lunch and dinner at $16.95 and $29.95, respectively.

La Vigna La Vigna [Official Photo]

Pop & Pour

Steps from the Dyckman Street subway station is this eclectic cafe and wine bar, where the menu pulls inspiration from Latin America and the States. Diners will find Inwood’s most exciting wine and craft beer selection here.

Harlem Shake

Three hot dogs in buns sit side by side atop a green and white checker board paper on a blue tray Harlem Shake/Facebook

Diner-like digs and items abound at Harlem Shake, where the move at this uptown spot is fries, a shake, and either a hot dog or burger — of which the classic “company burger” is best.

Three hot dogs in buns sit side by side atop a green and white checker board paper on a blue tray Harlem Shake/Facebook

Infamous Bistro

Set across St. John the Divine, Infamous Bistro is the next-door sister to Marlow Bistro, where diners will find the same neighborhood vibes and thoughtful menu options like roast chicken, lamb meatballs, a brisket burger, and ricotta ravioli. Plus, drinks here come from an Employees Only vet.

Quaint

Quaint Quaint [Official Photo]

Sunnyside’s Quaint has gained its neighborhood following for consistently delivering classic, unfussy, bistro-style comfort food and coupling it with a welcoming staff. Quaint is a solid choice if you want to dine before a flight out of LaGuardia Airport and are decidedly avoiding the airport’s onsite options.

Quaint Quaint [Official Photo]

Zauo

It’s best to bring a group to Zauo, the restaurant where diners fish for their dinner. This way there are more chances to try the restaurant’s appetizers and side dishes, in addition to the fish which is available four ways: sake-steamed, salt grilled, simmered in soy sauce, or tempura fried. Note: This is not the place to go for a quiet dinner, with staffers banging on drums each time a fish is caught.

Petite Boucherie

Petite Boucherie [Official Photo]

It’s somewhat surprising that the sprawling Sheridan Square brasserie called Boucherie could spawn sush a romantic French Bistro a couple blocks away. Petite Boucherie’s menu reads like that of the former Pastis, with lots of meat and seafood, along with the usual charcuterie, salads, and pastas, and a drinks menu that favors absinthe.

Petite Boucherie [Official Photo]

Ribalta

Ribalta Ribalta [Official Photo]

Little known fact is that the pizzas coming from master pizzaiolo Pasquale Cozzolino at Ribalta are VPN-certified, meaning that the Verace Pizza Napoletana Association — an Italian organization that certifies restaurants — has signed off on Ribalta’s employment of wood-fired ovens and its use of standardized ingredients of Neapolitan origin like 00 flour, San Marzano tomatoes, and buffalo mozzarella. All that said, Ribalta is a given when searching for that iconic, chewy Neapolitan pizza crust around New York.

Ribalta Ribalta [Official Photo]

Paulie Gee's

Owner Paul Giannone is known for using creative toppings at this Greenpoint pizzeria favorite. Speciality pizzas like the sopressata honey hellboy, which includes Mike’s Hot Honey for some kick, shouldn’t be missed. Plus, those avoiding dairy can revel in Paulie’s many vegan pizza and dessert options.

Pinch Chinese

Pinch Chinese Pinch Chinese/Facebook

Soup dumplings and an excellent wine list are the winning combo at Pinch Chinese in Soho, where dishes like Peking duck and dan dan noodles are also worth a try. Come for dumpling and drink deals during a daily happy hour that ends at 7 p.m.

Pinch Chinese Pinch Chinese/Facebook

Houseman

A grey awning stretches out over a New York City sidewalk, with the word “Houseman” in white Nick Solares

Everyone from an Eater staffer’s dad to New York Times critic Pete Wells is enamored with the chicken at Ned Baldwin’s Houseman in Hudson Square. The chicken is on a list of Houseman favorites alongside the steak frites, smoked duck, the burger, and whatever is for dessert that day.

A grey awning stretches out over a New York City sidewalk, with the word “Houseman” in white Nick Solares

Frankie Goes to Bollywood

Frankie Goes To Bollywood Frankie Goes To Bollywood/Facebook

The frankie — grilled flatbread enclosing fillings like spiced cauliflower and potato; tandoor chicken; and braised lamb with yogurt — is a Mumbai street food favorite. It was somewhat rare to find the dish in New York, until Frankie Goes to Bollywood opened last fall in Soho. The fast-casual shop also specializes in pakoras (chickpea-battered fritters), and chana masala (curried chickpeas) served with chips.

Frankie Goes To Bollywood Frankie Goes To Bollywood/Facebook

Grotta Azzurra

Grotta Azzurra Grotta Azzurra [Official Photo]

This true Little Italy institution remains though the storefronts around it are ever-changing. Probably because locals know they can find excellent zuppa di clams, unfussy gnocchi, and warming bolognese any night of the week.

Grotta Azzurra Grotta Azzurra [Official Photo]

Pho Bar

Pho Bar Pho Bar [Official Photo]

The soup oracles at Pho Bar (styled PhoBar) offer more than 10 varieties of the Vietnamese staple, including a spicy beef pho, oxtail pho with beef broth, and a vegetarian pho with carrots and daikon. Note: Only the Chinatown location of Pho Bar is participating in Eat for Good.

Pho Bar Pho Bar [Official Photo]

La Cafette

La Cafette La Cafette/Facebook

La Cafette in Williamsburg has all the cute restaurant makings like neon signs, decorative plate ware, and botanical wallpaper; but it also has the standout French bistro classics to back it up. Craveable dishes here include the buttery escargots, hanger steak frites, roast chicken with potatoes, and steak tartare.

La Cafette La Cafette/Facebook

La Vigna

La Vigna La Vigna [Official Photo]

Giussepe Vitale, a veteran of Lidia Bastianich’s kitchen, opened La Vigna as his own in the heart of Forest Hills. The heavily local restaurant doesn’t offer a bad risotto or pasta; plus there are pre-fixe options — two courses with coffee or tea — for both lunch and dinner at $16.95 and $29.95, respectively.

La Vigna La Vigna [Official Photo]

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