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A sprawling, ornate dining room with red chairs, mirrored walls, and fine tableware.
La Grenouille in Midtown.
Bess Adler/Eater

26 Classic Restaurants Every New Yorker Must Try

Step back in time with one of these restaurants — whether it’s an old-school steakhouse or the oldest restaurant in Chinatown

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La Grenouille in Midtown.
| Bess Adler/Eater

New York is one of the oldest dining cities in the country, and though it seems we’re always mourning the loss of yet another neighborhood stalwart, the city is still brimming with many iconic establishments. Here are the oldest and the greatest of New York's classic restaurants, all of them decades, if not a century, old. They range from legendary steakhouses to gritty taverns and coal-fired pizzerias — and they all are quintessentially New York.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; the latest data about the delta variant indicates that it may pose a low-to-moderate risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Mario's

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8196, 2342 Arthur Ave
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 584-1188

Now over a century old, Mario’s on the Bronx’s iconic Arthur Avenue is as old-school as it gets. The Migliucci family still owns this restaurant that started as a pizzeria, serving dishes such as linguine with red clam sauce and veal marsala. The interior looks untouched, full of oil paintings, Michelangelo statuettes, and white columns. Don’t miss the dessert trolley, and be sure to finish off with an espresso “corrected” with complimentary anisette.

A man in a yellow shirt walks under a red awning with the word “Mario’s”
Mario’s in the Bronx
Alex Staniloff/Eater

2. Sylvia's Restaurant

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328 Malcolm X Blvd
New York, NY 10027
(212) 996-0660
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Dubbed “the Queen of Soul Food,” Sylvia Woods opened the doors on Sylvia’s Restaurant in 1962, bringing generous servings of Southern comfort food to the neighborhood. The Harlem restaurant is world-famous for Woods’ timeless cooking, and for still maintaining its Southern charm decades after opening. While Woods passed away in 2012, her family still runs the restaurant.

A leg of fried chicken next to a helping of mac and cheese in an aluminum take-out container
Fried chicken with mac and cheese at Sylvia’s
Robert Sietsema/Eater

3. Patsy's Pizza

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2287 1st Ave
New York, NY 10035
(212) 534-9783
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Another one of Lombardi’s offspring, Patsy’s was founded in 1933, and it’s the only one of its coal-fired counterparts to offer single slices in addition to whole pies. There are a few offshoots now, but go to the original in Harlem for a perfect plain slice from the ancient oven.

Patsy’s in East Harlem has a dark exterior with a red “Patsy’s” neon sign
Patsy’s Pizza in East Harlem
Nick Solares/Eater

4. Barney Greengrass

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541 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10024
(212) 724-4707
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The aromas of smoked fish — sturgeon, salmon, and sable are just a few — is undeniable upon entering this appetizing joint on the Upper West Side as it has for nearly 100 years. There’s a good chance that third-generation proprietor Gary Greengrass is near the front door and will usher customers to one of the tables (ideally in the room with vintage-looking wallpaper depicting the French Quarter in New Orleans). The space still has a neighborhood charm to it and feels like a mashup between a diner and delicatessen.

The interior of Barney Greengrass with a man waiting to order food. The refrigerated counter showcases the different meats and spreads the establishment has to offer.
Barney Greengrass is an institution on the Upper West Side.
Bess Adler/Eater

5. Bohemian Hall & Beer Garden

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29-19 24th Ave
Astoria, NY 11102
(718) 274-4925
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This Astoria beer garden has been around since 1910, and is the oldest of its kind in the city. It’s a sprawling place with an enormous garden, which makes it especially popular in warmer months. The beer selection is solid, there’s a range of sausage and schnitzel to soak it up, and pitchers top out at around $20.

Cars line a two-way street in front of a building with a sign that reads “Beer Garden” in capital letters
Bohemian Hall & Beer Garden
Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

6. Barbetta

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321 W 46th St
New York, NY 10036
(212) 246-9171
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This opulent Italian restaurant in the Theater District has been around since 1906, and owned by the same family the entire time. It claims to be the first New York restaurant to serve a whole lot of things, including risotto, white truffles, sun-dried tomatoes, tiramisu, and decaf espresso. Perhaps that’s true, but the real draw is the garden, one of the best al fresco dining areas in the city.

A large, metal sign spans the length of a three-story building with the word “Barbetta” in all capital letters
Barbetta in the Theater District
Daniel Krieger/Eater

7. Frankie & Johnnie's Steakhouse

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320 West 46th Street
New York, NY 10036
(212) 997-9494
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It started as a speakeasy in 1926 and is now one of the city’s classic steakhouses. As one of the oldest restaurants in the Theater District, it was once a haunt of people like Frank Sinatra. When ordering, stick to the steakhouse classics — steak, creamed spinach, or any one of the myriad potato preparations.

A red awning is illuminated at night with the words: “FRANKIE & JOHNNIE’S STEAKHOUSE”
Frankie and Johnnie’s Steakhouse in the Theater District
Bess Adler/Eater

8. La Grenouille

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3 E 52nd St
New York, NY 10022
(212) 752-1495
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A survivor from the era when haute French cuisine was king, La Grenouille opened in 1962, and has outlasted many of its celebrated counterparts, like Lutece. As Eater’s critics once discovered at a meal there, the food is mostly unchanged, and excellent — that’s still true today. Go for the signature frogs legs, the classic Dover sole, or the pike quenelles topped with caviar and champagne cream sauce.

A sprawling, ornate dining room with red chairs, mirrored walls, and fine tableware
La Grenouille in Midtown.
Bess Adler/Eater

9. P.J. Clarke's

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915 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 317-1616
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Though it’s now expanded into a chain of pubs, the original P.J. Clarke’s has stood on Third Avenue since 1884. This is the one with the ancient mahogany bar, the old juke box, and the taxidermied dog at the bar. Over the years it has attracted regulars like Jackie Kennedy and Frank Sinatra. The bacon cheeseburger on the menu is called the “Cadillac” because that’s how Nat King Cole once described it.

An open-faced burger with lettuce, tomato, onion, and cheese next to a side of fries
A burger and fries at P.J. Clarkes
Nick Solares/Eater

10. Grand Central Oyster Bar

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89 E 42nd St
New York, NY 10017
(212) 490-6650
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Grand Central Oyster Bar has occupied the subterranean space in Grand Central Station since 1913. The award-winning room, with its vaulted, tiled ceilings is one of the main attractions here. The smart move is to sit at the bar and order raw oysters. While the iconic space was closed throughout most of the pandemic, it is slated to reopen the week of September 20.

Guests sit around a chef’s table below ornate, hanging lights and arched ceilings
Grand Central Oyster Bar in Grand Central
Daniel Krieger/Eater

11. Keens Steakhouse

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72 W 36th St
New York, NY 10018
(212) 947-3636
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One of Manhattan’s oldest and greatest steakhouse institutions Keens has stood on 36th Street since 1885, and it remains one of Midtown’s best restaurants. It’s famed for its mutton chop (though the steaks and the hash are also a good choice) and for the 90,000 or so clay pipes hanging from the ceiling, which used to be rented out to regulars for $5 a year.

Groups of people sit at tables in a low-light restaurant whose walls are lined with photos
Keens Steakhouse in Midtown
Daniel Krieger/Eater

12. Jahn's

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81-04 37th Ave #1
Queens, NY 11372
(718) 651-0700

At one point in time there were nearly three dozen locations of Jahn’s, which was a popular chain of ice cream parlors. Today, the only location left is in Jackson Heights, and it’s a spot where locals come for diner breakfasts, Greek classics like spanakopita, and of course, sundaes. This neighborhood favorite is over 60 years old.

13. Old Town Bar

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45 E 18th St.
New York, NY 10003
(212) 529-6732
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Old Town Bar has been in continuous operation since 1892, making it another one of the city’s ancient bars to have survived Prohibition. The space itself, with its tiled floor, wooden booths, and mahogany bar, is one of the main attractions, but Old Town also serves a superb burger and wings. Dine downstairs, and your food will be delivered to the bar via dumbwaiter from the kitchen upstairs.

A dilapidated chair sits in front of an old, wooden bar with multiple flyers in the window
Old Town Bar in Midtown
Kate Leonova/PropertyShark

14. John's of Bleecker Street

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278 Bleecker St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 243-1680
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John’s — another classic coal-oven pizzeria founded by a veteran of the original pizzeria Lombardi’s — opened in 1929 and today serves what Eater critic Robert Sietsema describes as a “lusher” pie than its counterparts of the same age. That means a little bit more cheese and a top-notch crust. Prepare to wait in line to enter.

People sit alone and in groups in a restaurant with tiled floors and wooden booths
John’s of Bleecker Street
Bess Adler/Eater

15. Ear Inn

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326 Spring St.
New York, NY 10013
(212) 226-9060
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The storefront at 326 Spring Street has been around since 1817, back when it was a tobacco shop. The building has housed a number of businesses since, but in 1890 it became a brewery with a saloon (which managed to survive Prohibition as a speakeasy). That bar didn’t have a real name until 1977, when new owners dubbed it Ear Inn. It serves a great burger, and is rumored to have a ghost or two.

Groups of people talk closely in a dive bar with empty liquor bottles and colorful lights
Ear Inn’s 200th birthday party.
Robert Sietsema/Eater

16. Katz's Delicatessen

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205 E Houston St
New York, NY 10002
(800) 446-8364
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Katz’s has stood on Houston Street since 1888, and the pastrami alone is a New York icon. The expansive, cafeteria-style dining room is almost always bustling, and diners have to know how to navigate the system. Get in line, remember to tip the slicer (they might give you an extra piece to snack on), and no matter what, don’t lose that ticket.

The front of a sprawling corner store at night, with red neon letters that read “Katz’s Delicatessen” in capital letters
Katz’s Delicatessen
Daniel Krieger/Eater

17. Lombardi's Coal Oven Pizza

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32 Spring St
New York, NY 10012
(212) 941-7994
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Lombardi’s is the first pizzeria in New York City and, supposedly, the country. It moved a few decades ago from the space it had occupied since 1905 to a place down the block, but it’s still one of the city’s few coal-oven pizzerias. Go early or late to avoid the onslaught of tourists, and get a basic red or white pie.

Four employees in red shirts and white aprons work in a kitchen, behind them the words “1905 Lombardi” are etched into a tile wall
Lombardi’s Coal Oven Pizza
Robert Sietsema/Eater

18. Forlini's

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98 Baxter St.
New York, NY 10013
(212) 349-6779
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A real-deal red sauce classic just outside the kitschy array of Little Italy, Forlini’s has been open since 1943 and caters to the judge-and-jury crowd from the nearby courthouse, as well as the Italian-American regulars. Inside, find tall, tufted leather banquettes, paintings in gilded frames, and all the old-school favorites, from veal piccata to baked ziti.

The outside of a brick building with red, cursive letters that read “Forlini’s”
Forlini’s in Litty Italy
Google Maps

19. Bamonte's

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32 Withers St
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 384-8831

A red-sauce stalwart of Brooklyn, Bamonte's has been open since 1902 and hasn’t been renovated since the 1950s. It’s said to have been a mobster hang and still attracts plenty of Williamsburg old-timers. Don’t miss the baked clams or the pork chop topped with peppers, which Eater critic Robert Sietsema deems “the city's most perfect evocation of that dish.”

The outside of a red restaurant with an American flag and a sign that reads “Bamonte’s Restaurant”
Bamonte’s
Daniel Krieger/Eater

20. Nom Wah Tea Parlor

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13 Doyers St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 962-6047
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Chinatown’s oldest restaurant serves up fresh and consistently delicious dim sum, ordered off a menu rather than a cart. The dining room, dating back to 1920, is a relic. Order the pork buns, the sticky rice in lotus leaves, the shrimp & chive dumplings, and any of the rice rolls. During peak dim sum hours (11 a.m. to 2 p.m.) there may be a wait, but it’s never unbearable.

Nom Wah Tea Parlor
Gary He/Eater

21. Wo Hop

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17 Mott St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 962-8617
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Wo Hop, founded in 1938, takes the distinction of the city’s second oldest Chinese restaurant. (Only Nom Wah Tea Parlor, originated in 1920 and also on this list, is older.) Its longevity is due to both the reliability of its Chinese-American fare, and the small, subterranean nature of the real estate it occupies. Try the massive platters of chicken chow mein, sweet-and-sour pork, subgum egg foo young (in the section “Chinese Omelettes”), and beef chow fun. While this address is considered the original Wo Hop, the street-level part of the restaurant is dubbed Wo Hop Next Door.

A waiter takes a customers order in a busy diner whose walls are lined with photos and dollar bills
Wo Hop
Gary He/Eater

22. Peter Luger Steak House

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178 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 387-7400
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Another of the city’s greatest steakhouses, Peter Luger opened in Williamsburg in 1887 and even today can often be a tough reservation to snag. Go for the porterhouse, of course, which is dry-aged and served in a pool of butter and its own juices. If there for lunch, don’t miss the hamburger.

Peter Luger’s hamburger with fries, on a white plate with blue markings
Peter Luger Steak House in Williamsburg
Nick Solares/Eater

23. Ferdinando's Focacceria

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151 Union St
Brooklyn, NY 11231
(718) 855-1545

This humble Sicilian restaurant has been operating on Columbia Street in Red Hook since 1904. Specialties include fist-sized fried rice balls, pasta alla sarde, a panelle sandwich (wedges of fried chickpea flour cake smothered in ricotta on a roll), and vestedda: veal spleen and ricotta on a roll.

The front of a small restaurant, whose red and blue striped awning reads “151 Fernando’s Restaurant Focacceria”
Ferdinando’s Focacceria
Kate Leonova/PropertyShark

24. Brennan & Carr

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3432 Nostrand Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 769-1254

Founded in 1938, Brennan & Carr is famous for its Irish roast beef sandwich, served in its own juices on a sandwich or a platter in much the same style as Los Angeles’ popular french dip. Get exactly that with a beer or order from a window on Avenue U to take it to go.

An Irish roast beef sandwich, served with cheese in its own juices
Brennan & Carr
Nick Solares/Eater

25. L&B Spumoni Gardens

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2725 86th St
Brooklyn, NY 11223
(718) 372-8400
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L & B Spumoni Gardens was founded in 1939 and is always at its best in the summer when it’s warm enough to sit at the picnic tables outside, which for a long time were the only seating there was. The restaurant sprawls across three buildings, each offering a different L & B specialty. There’s the namesake spumoni, of course, and the famed thick-crusted Sicilian pizza (served “upside down” with the sauce on top of the cheese), plus the monstrous meatball hero from the restaurant portion.

People linger around the outside of a restaurant, an outdoor seating area with red tables is still wet from a recent rainfall
L&B Spumoni Gardens
Robert Sietsema/Eater

26. Nathan's Famous

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1310 Surf Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 946-2202
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It might be a giant franchise now, but Nathan’s is a true New York institution. The Coney Island original opened in 1916, selling hot dogs for five cents. They cost more now, of course, but otherwise not much has changed about the experience of eating a cheap, greasy dog on the boardwalk.

Customers wait in a line that wraps around the corner of the colorful Nathan’s Famous restaurant in Coney Island
Nathan’s Famous
Nick Solares/Eater

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1. Mario's

8196, 2342 Arthur Ave, Bronx, NY 10458
A man in a yellow shirt walks under a red awning with the word “Mario’s”
Mario’s in the Bronx
Alex Staniloff/Eater

Now over a century old, Mario’s on the Bronx’s iconic Arthur Avenue is as old-school as it gets. The Migliucci family still owns this restaurant that started as a pizzeria, serving dishes such as linguine with red clam sauce and veal marsala. The interior looks untouched, full of oil paintings, Michelangelo statuettes, and white columns. Don’t miss the dessert trolley, and be sure to finish off with an espresso “corrected” with complimentary anisette.

8196, 2342 Arthur Ave
Bronx, NY 10458

2. Sylvia's Restaurant

328 Malcolm X Blvd, New York, NY 10027
A leg of fried chicken next to a helping of mac and cheese in an aluminum take-out container
Fried chicken with mac and cheese at Sylvia’s
Robert Sietsema/Eater

Dubbed “the Queen of Soul Food,” Sylvia Woods opened the doors on Sylvia’s Restaurant in 1962, bringing generous servings of Southern comfort food to the neighborhood. The Harlem restaurant is world-famous for Woods’ timeless cooking, and for still maintaining its Southern charm decades after opening. While Woods passed away in 2012, her family still runs the restaurant.

328 Malcolm X Blvd
New York, NY 10027

3. Patsy's Pizza

2287 1st Ave, New York, NY 10035
Patsy’s in East Harlem has a dark exterior with a red “Patsy’s” neon sign
Patsy’s Pizza in East Harlem
Nick Solares/Eater

Another one of Lombardi’s offspring, Patsy’s was founded in 1933, and it’s the only one of its coal-fired counterparts to offer single slices in addition to whole pies. There are a few offshoots now, but go to the original in Harlem for a perfect plain slice from the ancient oven.

2287 1st Ave
New York, NY 10035

4. Barney Greengrass

541 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10024
The interior of Barney Greengrass with a man waiting to order food. The refrigerated counter showcases the different meats and spreads the establishment has to offer.
Barney Greengrass is an institution on the Upper West Side.
Bess Adler/Eater

The aromas of smoked fish — sturgeon, salmon, and sable are just a few — is undeniable upon entering this appetizing joint on the Upper West Side as it has for nearly 100 years. There’s a good chance that third-generation proprietor Gary Greengrass is near the front door and will usher customers to one of the tables (ideally in the room with vintage-looking wallpaper depicting the French Quarter in New Orleans). The space still has a neighborhood charm to it and feels like a mashup between a diner and delicatessen.

541 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10024

5. Bohemian Hall & Beer Garden

29-19 24th Ave, Astoria, NY 11102
Cars line a two-way street in front of a building with a sign that reads “Beer Garden” in capital letters
Bohemian Hall & Beer Garden
Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

This Astoria beer garden has been around since 1910, and is the oldest of its kind in the city. It’s a sprawling place with an enormous garden, which makes it especially popular in warmer months. The beer selection is solid, there’s a range of sausage and schnitzel to soak it up, and pitchers top out at around $20.

29-19 24th Ave
Astoria, NY 11102

6. Barbetta

321 W 46th St, New York, NY 10036
A large, metal sign spans the length of a three-story building with the word “Barbetta” in all capital letters
Barbetta in the Theater District
Daniel Krieger/Eater

This opulent Italian restaurant in the Theater District has been around since 1906, and owned by the same family the entire time. It claims to be the first New York restaurant to serve a whole lot of things, including risotto, white truffles, sun-dried tomatoes, tiramisu, and decaf espresso. Perhaps that’s true, but the real draw is the garden, one of the best al fresco dining areas in the city.

321 W 46th St
New York, NY 10036

7. Frankie & Johnnie's Steakhouse

320 West 46th Street, New York, NY 10036
A red awning is illuminated at night with the words: “FRANKIE & JOHNNIE’S STEAKHOUSE”
Frankie and Johnnie’s Steakhouse in the Theater District
Bess Adler/Eater

It started as a speakeasy in 1926 and is now one of the city’s classic steakhouses. As one of the oldest restaurants in the Theater District, it was once a haunt of people like Frank Sinatra. When ordering, stick to the steakhouse classics — steak, creamed spinach, or any one of the myriad potato preparations.

320 West 46th Street
New York, NY 10036

8. La Grenouille

3 E 52nd St, New York, NY 10022
A sprawling, ornate dining room with red chairs, mirrored walls, and fine tableware
La Grenouille in Midtown.
Bess Adler/Eater

A survivor from the era when haute French cuisine was king, La Grenouille opened in 1962, and has outlasted many of its celebrated counterparts, like Lutece. As Eater’s critics once discovered at a meal there, the food is mostly unchanged, and excellent — that’s still true today. Go for the signature frogs legs, the classic Dover sole, or the pike quenelles topped with caviar and champagne cream sauce.

3 E 52nd St
New York, NY 10022

9. P.J. Clarke's

915 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10022
An open-faced burger with lettuce, tomato, onion, and cheese next to a side of fries
A burger and fries at P.J. Clarkes
Nick Solares/Eater

Though it’s now expanded into a chain of pubs, the original P.J. Clarke’s has stood on Third Avenue since 1884. This is the one with the ancient mahogany bar, the old juke box, and the taxidermied dog at the bar. Over the years it has attracted regulars like Jackie Kennedy and Frank Sinatra. The bacon cheeseburger on the menu is called the “Cadillac” because that’s how Nat King Cole once described it.

915 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10022

10. Grand Central Oyster Bar

89 E 42nd St, New York, NY 10017
Guests sit around a chef’s table below ornate, hanging lights and arched ceilings
Grand Central Oyster Bar in Grand Central
Daniel Krieger/Eater

Grand Central Oyster Bar has occupied the subterranean space in Grand Central Station since 1913. The award-winning room, with its vaulted, tiled ceilings is one of the main attractions here. The smart move is to sit at the bar and order raw oysters. While the iconic space was closed throughout most of the pandemic, it is slated to reopen the week of September 20.

89 E 42nd St
New York, NY 10017

11. Keens Steakhouse

72 W 36th St, New York, NY 10018
Groups of people sit at tables in a low-light restaurant whose walls are lined with photos
Keens Steakhouse in Midtown
Daniel Krieger/Eater

One of Manhattan’s oldest and greatest steakhouse institutions Keens has stood on 36th Street since 1885, and it remains one of Midtown’s best restaurants. It’s famed for its mutton chop (though the steaks and the hash are also a good choice) and for the 90,000 or so clay pipes hanging from the ceiling, which used to be rented out to regulars for $5 a year.

72 W 36th St
New York, NY 10018

12. Jahn's

81-04 37th Ave #1, Queens, NY 11372

At one point in time there were nearly three dozen locations of Jahn’s, which was a popular chain of ice cream parlors. Today, the only location left is in Jackson Heights, and it’s a spot where locals come for diner breakfasts, Greek classics like spanakopita, and of course, sundaes. This neighborhood favorite is over 60 years old.

81-04 37th Ave #1
Queens, NY 11372

13. Old Town Bar

45 E 18th St., New York, NY 10003
A dilapidated chair sits in front of an old, wooden bar with multiple flyers in the window
Old Town Bar in Midtown
Kate Leonova/PropertyShark

Old Town Bar has been in continuous operation since 1892, making it another one of the city’s ancient bars to have survived Prohibition. The space itself, with its tiled floor, wooden booths, and mahogany bar, is one of the main attractions, but Old Town also serves a superb burger and wings. Dine downstairs, and your food will be delivered to the bar via dumbwaiter from the kitchen upstairs.

45 E 18th St.
New York, NY 10003

14. John's of Bleecker Street

278 Bleecker St, New York, NY 10014
People sit alone and in groups in a restaurant with tiled floors and wooden booths
John’s of Bleecker Street
Bess Adler/Eater

John’s — another classic coal-oven pizzeria founded by a veteran of the original pizzeria Lombardi’s — opened in 1929 and today serves what Eater critic Robert Sietsema describes as a “lusher” pie than its counterparts of the same age. That means a little bit more cheese and a top-notch crust. Prepare to wait in line to enter.

278 Bleecker St
New York, NY 10014

15. Ear Inn

326 Spring St., New York, NY 10013
Groups of people talk closely in a dive bar with empty liquor bottles and colorful lights
Ear Inn’s 200th birthday party.
Robert Sietsema/Eater

The storefront at 326 Spring Street has been around since 1817, back when it was a tobacco shop. The building has housed a number of businesses since, but in 1890 it became a brewery with a saloon (which managed to survive Prohibition as a speakeasy). That bar didn’t have a real name until 1977, when new owners dubbed it Ear Inn. It serves a great burger, and is rumored to have a ghost or two.

326 Spring St.
New York, NY 10013

Related Maps

16. Katz's Delicatessen

205 E Houston St, New York, NY 10002
The front of a sprawling corner store at night, with red neon letters that read “Katz’s Delicatessen” in capital letters
Katz’s Delicatessen
Daniel Krieger/Eater

Katz’s has stood on Houston Street since 1888, and the pastrami alone is a New York icon. The expansive, cafeteria-style dining room is almost always bustling, and diners have to know how to navigate the system. Get in line, remember to tip the slicer (they might give you an extra piece to snack on), and no matter what, don’t lose that ticket.

205 E Houston St
New York, NY 10002

17. Lombardi's Coal Oven Pizza

32 Spring St, New York, NY 10012
Four employees in red shirts and white aprons work in a kitchen, behind them the words “1905 Lombardi” are etched into a tile wall
Lombardi’s Coal Oven Pizza
Robert Sietsema/Eater

Lombardi’s is the first pizzeria in New York City and, supposedly, the country. It moved a few decades ago from the space it had occupied since 1905 to a place down the block, but it’s still one of the city’s few coal-oven pizzerias. Go early or late to avoid the onslaught of tourists, and get a basic red or white pie.

32 Spring St
New York, NY 10012

18. Forlini's

98 Baxter St., New York, NY 10013
The outside of a brick building with red, cursive letters that read “Forlini’s”
Forlini’s in Litty Italy
Google Maps

A real-deal red sauce classic just outside the kitschy array of Little Italy, Forlini’s has been open since 1943 and caters to the judge-and-jury crowd from the nearby courthouse, as well as the Italian-American regulars. Inside, find tall, tufted leather banquettes, paintings in gilded frames, and all the old-school favorites, from veal piccata to baked ziti.

98 Baxter St.
New York, NY 10013

19. Bamonte's

32 Withers St, Brooklyn, NY 11211