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A worn corner facade with a frayed white and dark red awning.
Sevilla, one of the West Village’s few remaining Spanish restaurants.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

22 West Village Restaurants to Try

Korean ramen, Indian tacos, Middle Eastern lamb kebabs, and the city’s best Italian restaurant are all in this neighborhood

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Sevilla, one of the West Village’s few remaining Spanish restaurants.
| Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

No doubt, the West Village is one of the city's loveliest neighborhoods, composed of stately brownstones dating from the 1840s through the 1880s, modest small storefronts, a country church with formal gardens, and reclaimed port and industrial architecture turned into lofts, galleries, and coffee shops.

The borders of the neighborhood are open to discussion, but we’ve taken them to be the Hudson River and Seventh Avenue on the west and east, and Houston Street and 14th Street on the south and north, not including the Meat Packing District in the northwest corner of the region. Though the neighborhood is known as a wealthy one, the prices at its restaurants range from expensive to surprisingly modest, with an equally impressive range of dishes that run to steak frites, a fresh sardine banh mi, an old-fashioned Spanish paella that satisfies two or three, and a Swiss fondue service with your choice of bubbling cheese.

Here are 22 of Eater senior critic Robert Sietsema's picks for great West Village eats.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; the latest data about the delta variant indicates that it may pose a low-to-moderate risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Brunetti Pizza

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626 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 255-5699
Visit Website

A branch of a microscopic Westhampton pizzeria, Brunetti specializes in wood-fired pies. It offers seating in a front dining room with a wood-burning oven, and in a cozy atrium out back — perfect winter accommodations. Featuring local Long Island specimens, the clam pie is one of the city’s best, and there are a couple dozen other pizzas, plus apps that include Sicilian potato croquettes and lots of salads.

A pizza with big splotches of cheese and some char on the circumferential crust.
The classic margherita at Brunetti.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

2. A Salt & Battery

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112 Greenwich Ave
New York, NY 10011
(212) 691-2713
Visit Website

English fish and chips have rarely been done so well on these shores as at this shop with minimal seating, brought to you by the Tea & Sympathy folks. Dipped in beer batter, the fillets come out crisp, whether cod, haddock, whiting, or sole; the shrimp and scallops aren’t bad, either. Sides include mushy peas, baked beans, curry sauce, a banger, and irregular chips that are every bit as good as they need to be.

A wooden bench in front of a makeshift white facade with the name in block letters.
A bench sits out front of A Salt & Battery.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

3. The Lavaux Wine Bar

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630 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(646) 692-3328
Visit Website

This unusual wine bar offers exclusively the products of a single Swiss wine company located in the French-speaking part of the country, so it’s more like a winery showroom than a restaurant. The decor is exceptionally pleasant (there’s a gondola from a ski resort in one corner, with an intimate table inside), and the white wines made from the chasselas grape are particularly notable and unique. The food seems almost an afterthought, though there’s no better place in town for a fondue these days, and the charcuterie and cheese boards are also a good bet.

A hand holds a fork with a small potato being dipped in a cheese sauce.
Fondue at Lavaux Wine Bar.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

4. St Tropez

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304 West 4th Street
New York, NY 10014
(917) 388-3893
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While most wine bars in the West Village concentrate on Italian products, this place is markedly different. The wine list is exclusively French, with some bargains if you look carefully, including good glasses of Bordeaux — white or red — at a modest price. The food is Provençale, running from charcuterie to snacks to generous full-plate meals. The frisee salad is great, with more bacon than expected, while the crevettes a l’aioli — grilled shrimp with tarragon mayo — is creamy goodness on a plate. The wide and shallow place looks out on quiet and charming West 4th Street, and outdoor seating is extensive.

A salad of chickory with an egg on top and loads of bacon and greens around the periphery.
Frisee salad at St Tropez.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

5. Mémé Mediterranean

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581 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(646) 692-8450
Visit Website

This modest restaurant organized along the lines of a Mediterranean rim bistro is a breath of fresh air on a street with many gimmicky establishments. Lunch is the most laid back time to go, but there’s a good chance of getting a table almost any time. Beets with goat cheese are a good choice, but so are the fried artichokes with shaved manchego cheese. Entrees run to the usual moussaka, grilled octopus, and kebabs.

A facade with tables on the sidewalk seen through a scaffold.
Mémé Mediterranean.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

6. Rahi

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60 Greenwich Ave
New York, NY 10011
(212) 373-8900
Visit Website

Rahi is one of a spate of ambitious Indian restaurants that rework familiar dishes with new ingredients, via chef Chintan Pandya of Dhamaka fame. The menu contains many surprises. Thus kofta, usually a ground meat dish, is here made with spaghetti squash, shaping it into globular fritters and then immersing them in a rich butternut squash puree. The dish is punctuated with little dabs of whipped paneer, and the effect is unforgettable.

Wads of kofta dumplings are submerged in a brown gravy with dabs of white whipped paneer.
Spaghetti squash kofta at Rahi.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

7. Anton's

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570 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 924-0818
Visit Website

The retrograde elegance of this West Villager makes it seem like an ancient spot, and the menu keeps pace, sometimes with adapted dishes the city hasn’t seen in decades. Though the food can be inconsistent, bouillabaisse a la Manhattan (a spare version of the Marseilles classic that includes broccoli rabe) and the simple omelet with a green salad are compelling enough that you may return to try them again.

A bowl of red soup with shrimp and broccoli rabe visible.
Bouillabaisse a la Manhattan at Anton’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

8. Perry St

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Perry St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 352-1900
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Located in the high-rise condo in which Jean-Georges Vongerichten lives — and hence an excellent spot for celebrity spotting — this lesser project in his empire was founded in 2005, serving an international take on French cuisine with a casual edge. This means a yellowfin burger with yuzu sauce, butter-poached lobster with lemongrass-lime leaf sauce, and caramelized beef tenderloin with a gravy boat of béarnaise. The views of the Hudson River from the outdoor terrace are stunning.

Fancy fried chicken in a yellow habanero sauce surrounded by a ring of leaves
Fried chicken with habanero sauce at Perry St.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

9. Mary's Fish Camp

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64 Charles St
New York, NY 10014
(646) 486-2185
Visit Website

Part of a mini-fad of small neighborhood seafood joints at the turn of the century, Mary’s takes a Florida fish camp as its theme, serving up exemplary chowders, fried fish sandwiches with haystack fries, lobster rolls, and even a fresh-sardine banh mi on a menu that’s constantly changing. The corner location is hedged with potted herbs and flowers, and many of the patrons are neighborhood regulars.

A long white rectangular dish with cubed raw fish and capers and herbs on top.
Japanese yellowtail tiradito at Mary’s Fish Camp.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

10. Sevilla Restaurant

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62 Charles St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 929-3189
Visit Website

Decades ago Greenwich Village (of which the West Village is a part) boasted many Spanish restaurants, many dating to the time of the Spanish Revolution. Now Sevilla is one of the few that remain, a palace of paella where the waiters wear short tuxes, the décor will cast you back to the 1940s, and the chorizo arrives aflame. You can smell the garlic wafting down the street.

An aluminum pot with seafood, yellow rice, and bright red peppers.
Sevilla’s paella feeds two or three.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

11. The Little Taco House

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246 West 4th Street
New York, NY 10014
(646) 719-1600

When they say little, they mean little. This closet of a space has only three stools, but the tacos are exemplary, providing one of the neighborhood’s best budget meals. Neither does this taqueria skimp on the fillings, which include such arcana as tongue and carnitas, in addition to grilled steak, fried fish, and for vegetarians, cactus. Burritos, quesadillas, nachos, and tortas are also available.

Three double tortilla tacos stuffed with meat and greenery and topped with red salsa
Three tacos at Little Taco House.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

12. Katana Kitten

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531 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 243-3000
Visit Website

Everyone wants to stand upstairs and swill cocktails, but you’re better off in the comparative comfort of the downstairs at Katana Kitten, where you can enjoy the signature dishes of this atypical izakaya, conceived by bartender Masahiro Urushido. Get a load of the more daring offerings: fried mortadella sandwiches, deviled eggs with uni, and gravy fries as good as they make ’em in Jersey.

Three deviled eggs with orange sea urchin draped on top.
Deviled eggs with uni at Katana Kitten.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

13. Empellón Taqueria

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230 W 4th St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 367-0999
Visit Website

For creative Mexican fare, check out Empellon Taqueria from chef Alex Stupak, which sports a cocktail lounge in front and a formal dining room in back. The taco fillings may seem unusual to some, but many are also awesome, including short-rib pastrami with mustard seed salsa, and shaved Brussels sprouts with toasted almonds. Yes, this sort of thing has been done forever in L.A., but only more recently here.

A flat tortilla with chunks of red meat and a salsa that looks like fish eggs.
Pastrami taco with mustard seed salsa at Empellón Taqueria.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

14. El Jalapeño Truck

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72 Grove St
New York, NY 10014
(347) 697-0081

This bright orange and green van has become a fixture on the south side of Sheridan Square, where you can eat your purchases next to the stark white “Gay Liberation” sculpture by George Segal in what is now a national park. The tacos are good, for sure, with the usual fillings running from steak carne asada to the more uncommon ox tongue. Even better are the burritos, finished on the flattop till the flour tortilla wrappers warm and brown and bubble.

A burrito browned on the outside cut in half and oozing cheese and meat.
Carne enchilada burrito from El Jalapeño.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

15. Via Carota

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Read Review |
51 Grove St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 255-1962
Visit Website

This long and shallow restaurant with lots of windows brings the West Village cityscape indoors, and offers an insider’s take on Tuscan food via chefs Rita Sodi (who grew up in Tuscany) and Jody Williams (who is also chef at the wildly popular French coffee shop Buvette, just down the street). It is simply the city’s best Italian restaurant. Pastas are de-emphasized in favor of market-driven vegetable selections, charcuterie, seafood, and inventive almost-mains, such as a buttery and garlic-drenched chopped steak, and a chicken-fried rabbit served on savory French toast.

Fired rabbit looking like fried chicken with a rosemary sprig sticking up.
Fried rabbit at Via Carota.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

16. Jeju Noodle Bar

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679 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10014
(646) 666-0947
Visit Website

The corner space has been reopened as Douglas Kim’s stylish Korean noodle parlor Jeju Noodle Bar, serving up the Korean version of ramen, known as ramyun. These wavy noodles are dense and of high quality. One narrow, dark, and tall bowl called “so-ramyun” features a beefy broth made from veal bones. Pieces of brisket and raw steak are dropped in the broth, as pickled garlic, fried garlic, and garlic oil ramp up the flavor.

A well windowed facade with a couple of figures walking by and a red awning.
The exterior of Jeju plays off its resemblance to Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks”
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

17. Malatesta Trattoria

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649 Washington St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 741-1207
Visit Website

Started by some pals from Emilia-Romagna two decades ago, and located on a remote stretch of Christopher Street still a little raffish, Malatesta offers simple and relatively inexpensive Northern Italian fare. Signatures include the oven-baked flatbread called piadina, like a flour tortilla used as a launching pad for cheese or charcuterie, and a superior take on bolognese sauce (from Bologna, the capital of the region) served over tagliatelle.

A corner storefront thrusts toward the viewer surrounded by outdoor tables on a fine summer day.
Outdoor seating is popular at Malatesta.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

18. Suprema Provisions

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305 Bleecker St
New York, NY 10014
(646) 964-4994
Visit Website

With entrances on both Bleecker Street and Seventh Avenue South, this ungainly space is long, crooked, and narrow, part of which is devoted to an Italian grocery. But increasingly as the restaurant has become a hit, more of the space has been devoted to tables. At night, the dining room is dark and noisy, with a lively bar scene on the Seventh Avenue South side. The menu features impressive pastas and salads appropriate to the season. Mixed drinks are available, in addition to a modest wine list.

A storefront at night, with illuminated hams in the window and three shadowy figures passing outside.
Suprema Provisions by night.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

19. Taco Mahal

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73 7th Ave S
New York, NY 10014
(646) 719-1553
Visit Website

It’s a great place for a quick bite, but in good weather the sidewalk seating area right at the corner of Bleecker and Seventh Avenue south is the perfect place to linger. The output of this northern Indian café is flatbread wraps, including one made with a small roti and another with big puffy naan. The stiffer, less starchy roti is probably the way to go, enfolding a substantial serving of palak paneer, lamb curry, crumbed and fried salmon, chickpeas, or chicken kebab.

Two colorful Indian tacos made with thick naan bread.
Palak paneer tacos on naan.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

20. Oscar's Place

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466 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 741-6479
Visit Website

This renegade bistro was once a location of Petit Abeille, taken over by its employees when it was in danger of closing. Now a few of the old Belgian dishes remain, including beer-laced beef stew and mussels in many guises — and oh, those pommes frites! The menu now extends to English creations such as fish and chips, bangers and mash, and steak and kidney pie. The bacon cheeseburger has become a must-try.

A hamburger in the foreground with cheese melted on top and a pile of bacon on top of that.
Oscar’s bacon cheeseburger.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

21. Osteria Carlina

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455 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(646) 559-5137
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This newcomer concentrates on the cuisine of Italy’s far north, centering on Turin. It spills tables onto the sidewalk in the southwestern corner of the neighborhood, one of its serenest precincts. The perfect starter is vitello tonnato, a dish of thin veal slices with a smoothly pureed sauce of tinned tuna decorated with caperberries. Then your meal may proceed to a pasta like beet ravioli or a main course such as stuffed cuttlefish. The wine list isn’t cheap, but it has many estimable Italian vintages, making this a great place for a celebratory meal.

Beige meat in a beige sauce with stem-on green caperberries.
Veal tonnato at Osteria Carlina.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

22. EN Japanese Brasserie

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435 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 647-9196
Visit Website

Now over a decade old, EN Japanese Brasserie pioneered a new style of Japanese dining that featured eclectic small dishes from various regions — but pointedly, no sushi other than the stray nori roll. The premises are elegant, with a bar and small dining room up front, and larger dining room in back that wraps around a seasonal display of foliage. Served in a wooden box, the freshly made tofu is legendary, and so are the short plates from Kyoto called obanzai.

A gray storefront with a few steps up to the entrance, with very discreet signage.
The white and black facade of En.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

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1. Brunetti Pizza

626 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
A pizza with big splotches of cheese and some char on the circumferential crust.
The classic margherita at Brunetti.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

A branch of a microscopic Westhampton pizzeria, Brunetti specializes in wood-fired pies. It offers seating in a front dining room with a wood-burning oven, and in a cozy atrium out back — perfect winter accommodations. Featuring local Long Island specimens, the clam pie is one of the city’s best, and there are a couple dozen other pizzas, plus apps that include Sicilian potato croquettes and lots of salads.

626 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

2. A Salt & Battery

112 Greenwich Ave, New York, NY 10011
A wooden bench in front of a makeshift white facade with the name in block letters.
A bench sits out front of A Salt & Battery.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

English fish and chips have rarely been done so well on these shores as at this shop with minimal seating, brought to you by the Tea & Sympathy folks. Dipped in beer batter, the fillets come out crisp, whether cod, haddock, whiting, or sole; the shrimp and scallops aren’t bad, either. Sides include mushy peas, baked beans, curry sauce, a banger, and irregular chips that are every bit as good as they need to be.

112 Greenwich Ave
New York, NY 10011

3. The Lavaux Wine Bar

630 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
A hand holds a fork with a small potato being dipped in a cheese sauce.
Fondue at Lavaux Wine Bar.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This unusual wine bar offers exclusively the products of a single Swiss wine company located in the French-speaking part of the country, so it’s more like a winery showroom than a restaurant. The decor is exceptionally pleasant (there’s a gondola from a ski resort in one corner, with an intimate table inside), and the white wines made from the chasselas grape are particularly notable and unique. The food seems almost an afterthought, though there’s no better place in town for a fondue these days, and the charcuterie and cheese boards are also a good bet.

630 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

4. St Tropez

304 West 4th Street, New York, NY 10014
A salad of chickory with an egg on top and loads of bacon and greens around the periphery.
Frisee salad at St Tropez.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

While most wine bars in the West Village concentrate on Italian products, this place is markedly different. The wine list is exclusively French, with some bargains if you look carefully, including good glasses of Bordeaux — white or red — at a modest price. The food is Provençale, running from charcuterie to snacks to generous full-plate meals. The frisee salad is great, with more bacon than expected, while the crevettes a l’aioli — grilled shrimp with tarragon mayo — is creamy goodness on a plate. The wide and shallow place looks out on quiet and charming West 4th Street, and outdoor seating is extensive.

304 West 4th Street
New York, NY 10014

5. Mémé Mediterranean

581 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
A facade with tables on the sidewalk seen through a scaffold.
Mémé Mediterranean.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This modest restaurant organized along the lines of a Mediterranean rim bistro is a breath of fresh air on a street with many gimmicky establishments. Lunch is the most laid back time to go, but there’s a good chance of getting a table almost any time. Beets with goat cheese are a good choice, but so are the fried artichokes with shaved manchego cheese. Entrees run to the usual moussaka, grilled octopus, and kebabs.

581 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

6. Rahi

60 Greenwich Ave, New York, NY 10011
Wads of kofta dumplings are submerged in a brown gravy with dabs of white whipped paneer.
Spaghetti squash kofta at Rahi.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Rahi is one of a spate of ambitious Indian restaurants that rework familiar dishes with new ingredients, via chef Chintan Pandya of Dhamaka fame. The menu contains many surprises. Thus kofta, usually a ground meat dish, is here made with spaghetti squash, shaping it into globular fritters and then immersing them in a rich butternut squash puree. The dish is punctuated with little dabs of whipped paneer, and the effect is unforgettable.

60 Greenwich Ave
New York, NY 10011

7. Anton's

570 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
A bowl of red soup with shrimp and broccoli rabe visible.
Bouillabaisse a la Manhattan at Anton’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The retrograde elegance of this West Villager makes it seem like an ancient spot, and the menu keeps pace, sometimes with adapted dishes the city hasn’t seen in decades. Though the food can be inconsistent, bouillabaisse a la Manhattan (a spare version of the Marseilles classic that includes broccoli rabe) and the simple omelet with a green salad are compelling enough that you may return to try them again.

570 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

8. Perry St

Perry St, New York, NY 10014
Fancy fried chicken in a yellow habanero sauce surrounded by a ring of leaves
Fried chicken with habanero sauce at Perry St.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Located in the high-rise condo in which Jean-Georges Vongerichten lives — and hence an excellent spot for celebrity spotting — this lesser project in his empire was founded in 2005, serving an international take on French cuisine with a casual edge. This means a yellowfin burger with yuzu sauce, butter-poached lobster with lemongrass-lime leaf sauce, and caramelized beef tenderloin with a gravy boat of béarnaise. The views of the Hudson River from the outdoor terrace are stunning.

Perry St
New York, NY 10014

9. Mary's Fish Camp

64 Charles St, New York, NY 10014
A long white rectangular dish with cubed raw fish and capers and herbs on top.
Japanese yellowtail tiradito at Mary’s Fish Camp.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Part of a mini-fad of small neighborhood seafood joints at the turn of the century, Mary’s takes a Florida fish camp as its theme, serving up exemplary chowders, fried fish sandwiches with haystack fries, lobster rolls, and even a fresh-sardine banh mi on a menu that’s constantly changing. The corner location is hedged with potted herbs and flowers, and many of the patrons are neighborhood regulars.

64 Charles St
New York, NY 10014

10. Sevilla Restaurant

62 Charles St, New York, NY 10014
An aluminum pot with seafood, yellow rice, and bright red peppers.
Sevilla’s paella feeds two or three.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Decades ago Greenwich Village (of which the West Village is a part) boasted many Spanish restaurants, many dating to the time of the Spanish Revolution. Now Sevilla is one of the few that remain, a palace of paella where the waiters wear short tuxes, the décor will cast you back to the 1940s, and the chorizo arrives aflame. You can smell the garlic wafting down the street.

62 Charles St
New York, NY 10014

11. The Little Taco House

246 West 4th Street, New York, NY 10014
Three double tortilla tacos stuffed with meat and greenery and topped with red salsa
Three tacos at Little Taco House.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

When they say little, they mean little. This closet of a space has only three stools, but the tacos are exemplary, providing one of the neighborhood’s best budget meals. Neither does this taqueria skimp on the fillings, which include such arcana as tongue and carnitas, in addition to grilled steak, fried fish, and for vegetarians, cactus. Burritos, quesadillas, nachos, and tortas are also available.

246 West 4th Street
New York, NY 10014

12. Katana Kitten

531 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
Three deviled eggs with orange sea urchin draped on top.
Deviled eggs with uni at Katana Kitten.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Everyone wants to stand upstairs and swill cocktails, but you’re better off in the comparative comfort of the downstairs at Katana Kitten, where you can enjoy the signature dishes of this atypical izakaya, conceived by bartender Masahiro Urushido. Get a load of the more daring offerings: fried mortadella sandwiches, deviled eggs with uni, and gravy fries as good as they make ’em in Jersey.

531 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

13. Empellón Taqueria

230 W 4th St, New York, NY 10014
A flat tortilla with chunks of red meat and a salsa that looks like fish eggs.
Pastrami taco with mustard seed salsa at Empellón Taqueria.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

For creative Mexican fare, check out Empellon Taqueria from chef Alex Stupak, which sports a cocktail lounge in front and a formal dining room in back. The taco fillings may seem unusual to some, but many are also awesome, including short-rib pastrami with mustard seed salsa, and shaved Brussels sprouts with toasted almonds. Yes, this sort of thing has been done forever in L.A., but only more recently here.

230 W 4th St
New York, NY 10014

14. El Jalapeño Truck

72 Grove St, New York, NY 10014
A burrito browned on the outside cut in half and oozing cheese and meat.
Carne enchilada burrito from El Jalapeño.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This bright orange and green van has become a fixture on the south side of Sheridan Square, where you can eat your purchases next to the stark white “Gay Liberation” sculpture by George Segal in what is now a national park. The tacos are good, for sure, with the usual fillings running from steak carne asada to the more uncommon ox tongue. Even better are the burritos, finished on the flattop till the flour tortilla wrappers warm and brown and bubble.

72 Grove St
New York, NY 10014

15. Via Carota

51 Grove St, New York, NY 10014
Read Review |
Fired rabbit looking like fried chicken with a rosemary sprig sticking up.
Fried rabbit at Via Carota.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This long and shallow restaurant with lots of windows brings the West Village cityscape indoors, and offers an insider’s take on Tuscan food via chefs Rita Sodi (who grew up in Tuscany) and Jody Williams (who is also chef at the wildly popular French coffee shop Buvette, just down the street). It is simply the city’s best Italian restaurant. Pastas are de-emphasized in favor of market-driven vegetable selections, charcuterie, seafood, and inventive almost-mains, such as a buttery and garlic-drenched chopped steak, and a chicken-fried rabbit served on savory French toast.

51 Grove St
New York, NY 10014

Related Maps

16. Jeju Noodle Bar

679 Greenwich Street, New York, NY 10014
A well windowed facade with a couple of figures walking by and a red awning.
The exterior of Jeju plays off its resemblance to Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks”
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The corner space has been reopened as Douglas Kim’s stylish Korean noodle parlor Jeju Noodle Bar, serving up the Korean version of ramen, known as ramyun. These wavy noodles are dense and of high quality. One narrow, dark, and tall bowl called “so-ramyun” features a beefy broth made from veal bones. Pieces of brisket and raw steak are dropped in the broth, as pickled garlic, fried garlic, and garlic oil ramp up the flavor.

679 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10014

17. Malatesta Trattoria

649 Washington St, New York, NY 10014
A corner storefront thrusts toward the viewer surrounded by outdoor tables on a fine summer day.
Outdoor seating is popular at Malatesta.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Started by some pals from Emilia-Romagna two decades ago, and located on a remote stretch of Christopher Street still a little raffish, Malatesta offers simple and relatively inexpensive Northern Italian fare. Signatures include the oven-baked flatbread called piadina, like a flour tortilla used as a launching pad for cheese or charcuterie, and a superior take on bolognese sauce (from Bologna, the capital of the region) served over tagliatelle.

649 Washington St
New York, NY 10014

18. Suprema Provisions

305 Bleecker St, New York, NY 10014
A storefront at night, with illuminated hams in the window and three shadowy figures passing outside.
Suprema Provisions by night.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

With entrances on both Bleecker Street and Seventh Avenue South, this ungainly space is long, crooked, and narrow, part of which is devoted to an Italian grocery. But increasingly as the restaurant has become a hit, more of the space has been devoted to tables. At night, the dining room is dark and noisy, with a lively bar scene on the Seventh Avenue South side. The menu features impressive pastas and salads appropriate to the season. Mixed drinks are available, in addition to a modest wine list.

305 Bleecker St
New York, NY 10014

19. Taco Mahal

73 7th Ave S, New York, NY 10014
Two colorful Indian tacos made with thick naan bread.
Palak paneer tacos on naan.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

It’s a great place for a quick bite, but in good weather the sidewalk seating area right at the corner of Bleecker and Seventh Avenue south is the perfect place to linger. The output of this northern Indian café is flatbread wraps, including one made with a small roti and another with big puffy naan. The stiffer, less starchy roti is probably the way to go, enfolding a substantial serving of palak paneer, lamb curry, crumbed and fried salmon, chickpeas, or chicken kebab.

73 7th Ave S
New York, NY 10014

20. Oscar's Place

466 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
A hamburger in the foreground with cheese melted on top and a pile of bacon on top of that.
Oscar’s bacon cheeseburger.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This renegade bistro was once a location of Petit Abeille, taken over by its employees when it was in danger of closing. Now a few of the old Belgian dishes remain, including beer-laced beef stew and mussels in many guises — and oh, those pommes frites! The menu now extends to English creations such as fish and chips, bangers and mash, and steak and kidney pie. The bacon cheeseburger has become a must-try.

466 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

21. Osteria Carlina

455 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
Beige meat in a beige sauce with stem-on green caperberries.
Veal tonnato at Osteria Carlina.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This newcomer concentrates on the cuisine of Italy’s far north, centering on Turin. It spills tables onto the sidewalk in the southwestern corner of the neighborhood, one of its serenest precincts. The perfect starter is vitello tonnato, a dish of thin veal slices with a smoothly pureed sauce of tinned tuna decorated with caperberries. Then your meal may proceed to a pasta like beet ravioli or a main course such as stuffed cuttlefish. The wine list isn’t cheap, but it has many estimable Italian vintages, making this a great place for a celebratory meal.

455 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

22. EN Japanese Brasserie

435 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
A gray storefront with a few steps up to the entrance, with very discreet signage.
The white and black facade of En.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Now over a decade old, EN Japanese Brasserie pioneered a new style of Japanese dining that featured eclectic small dishes from various regions — but pointedly, no sushi other than the stray nori roll. The premises are elegant, with a bar and small dining room up front, and larger dining room in back that wraps around a seasonal display of foliage. Served in a wooden box, the freshly made tofu is legendary, and so are the short plates from Kyoto called obanzai.

435 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

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