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A dish of trout with a saffron-colored sauce.
Hudson Valley Steelhead Trout at the Mary Lane.
The Mary Lane

22 Impressive West Village Restaurants to Try

Korean ramen, Indian tacos, Colonial boiled tongue, Brazilian feijoada, and a few of the city’s best Italian restaurants are all in this neighborhood

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Hudson Valley Steelhead Trout at the Mary Lane.
| The Mary Lane

No doubt, the West Village is one of the city's loveliest neighborhoods, composed of stately brownstones dating from the 1800s, modest small storefronts with unique merchandise, a country church with formal flower gardens, and reclaimed port and industrial architecture turned into lofts, galleries, and coffee shops.

The borders of the neighborhood can feel a little murky, but we’ve taken them to be the Hudson River to Seventh Avenue on the west and east, and Houston Street to 14th Street on the south and north. Though the neighborhood’s real estate is among the most exorbitant, the prices at its restaurants range from expensive to surprisingly modest, with an impressive range of offerings that include reasonably priced sushi, Spanish paella, Brazilian feijoada, tacos fashioned from Indian flatbreads, and one of the city’s most celebrated hamburgers.

Here are 22 of Eater senior critic Robert Sietsema's picks for great West Village eats.

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This Australian cafe and coffee shop tucked right below the Meatpacking District provides what amounts to a brunch menu available all week long. The avocado toast is sent spinning in a Middle Eastern direction with za’atar, feta, and pumpkin seeds, and it can be accessorized with poached eggs and side meats. Mushroom wraps and fried chicken sandwiches are other options, but don’t go looking for a hamburger or ham sandwich at this quirky breakfast bistro.

A toast smeared green with seeds on top, and a poached egg in a small bowl and bacon on the side.
Avocado toast at Banter.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

A Salt & Battery

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English fish and chips have rarely been done so well on these shores as at this shop with minimal seating, brought to you by the Tea & Sympathy folks. Dipped in beer batter, the fillets come out crisp (whether cod, haddock, whiting, or sole), and the shrimp and scallops aren’t bad, either. Sides include mushy peas, baked beans, curry sauce, bangers, and chips that are every bit as good as they need to be.

A wooden bench in front of a makeshift white facade with the name in block letters.
A bench sits out front of A Salt & Battery.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Lavaux Wine Bar

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This unusual wine bar offers the products of a Swiss wine company located in the French-speaking part of the country, so it’s more of a winery showroom than restaurant. The decor is exceptionally pleasant (there’s a ski-resort gondola in one corner with a table inside), and the white wines made from the Swiss Chasselas grape are particularly notable. Overall, the food seems like an afterthought, though there’s no better place in town for fondue, and the charcuterie and cheese boards are also a good bet.

A hand holds a fork with a small potato being dipped in a cheese sauce.
Fondue at Lavaux Wine Bar.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Corner Bistro

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Corner Bistro isn’t a bistro, but an Irish bar dating to 1961 with the requisite dark wood-paneling, brass rails, and musty beer smells, with a rear room that constitutes something of a neighborhood hideout. The place became famous in the ‘90s for its simple burgers and decent fries cooked in a small closet next to the bar, but in the ensuing decades, the quality declined. Based on a recent visit, I’m pleased to announce that the quality has soared to something like its original magnificence. There’s no better place to grab a beer on a weekday afternoon, when the place is nearly empty.

A beef patty on a bun with two slices of cheese melted over the top, with the top of the bun, lettuce, and tomato slice not yet applied.
The famed cheeseburger at Corner Bistro.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

St. Tropez

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The wine list is exclusively French, with some bargains if you look carefully, including good glasses of Bordeaux — white or red — at modest prices. The food is Provençale, running from charcuterie to full-plate meals. The frisee salad is great, with more bacon than expected, while the crevettes a l’aioli — grilled shrimp with tarragon mayo — is creamy excellence on a plate. The place looks out on charming West Fourth Street right before it paradoxically crosses West 12th Street.

A salad of chickory with an egg on top and loads of bacon and greens around the periphery.
Frisee salad at St Tropez.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Mary Lane

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The Mary Lane is a sleeper — a pleasant restaurant with a relaxing setting on a West Village side street known mainly to area residents. The restaurant describes itself as a farm-to-table place; while the dishes reflect this type of sourcing, the execution is often surprising, and many dishes have unexpected twists. An engaging shade of green, an asparagus soup comes with crab, smoked creme fraiche, and slivered almonds. Chicken cacciatore arrives ensconced in ravioli, with olives and swatches of crisp chicken skin.

A pea green soup with stuff floating in it.
Asparagus soup at Mary Lane.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

In its exploration of southern Indian cooking, Semma is quite simply mind boggling, via chef Vijay Kumar, who was born in Tamil Nadu. Whether you stray into unfamiliar territory — the goat intestines served on a banana leaf are an example — or stick with curries with venison or lobster tail, you will enjoy subtle spice combinations and high-quality ingredients. The triangular gunpowder dosa is the best around.

A room with a white bar at the right and row of tables at the last, accented in orange.
Semma’s interior.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Morandi

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I didn’t very much like Morandi when it opened right off Seventh Avenue South in 2007, but on a recent revisit, the food via the controversial Keith McNally was splendid. The pan-Italian menu features lively salads, fried artichokes, bruschetta, seafood fritto misto, hand-rolled pici with lemon and parmesan, and Sicilian meatballs. As an added plus, the place opens every day at 8 a.m. with espresso and Italian-leaning breakfast selections.

Three toasted with a bright green topping surmounted by ricotta.
Fava bean bruschetta at Morandi.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Cafe Panino Mucho Giusto

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This is where West Villagers hang. A small sandwich shop with a friendly staff peddles sandwiches (try the chicken panino with generous slices of tomato and avocado), soups, breakfast pastries, beer, wine, and coffee beverages — the latter good and strong.

Three women sit around a wooden table with chalkboard menus behind and above them.
The afternoon scene at Cafe Panino Mucho Giusto.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Mary's Fish Camp

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Part of a mini-fad of small neighborhood seafood joints at the turn of the century, Mary Redding’s restaurant takes a Florida fish camp as its theme, serving up exemplary chowders, fried fish sandwiches with haystack fries, lobster rolls, fish tacos, and even a bouillabaisse on a menu that’s constantly changing. The corner location is hedged with potted herbs and flowers, and many of the patrons live in the surrounding townhouses (For celebrity watchers: Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick live nearby).

A long white rectangular dish with cubed raw fish and capers and herbs on top.
Japanese yellowtail tiradito at Mary’s Fish Camp.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Sevilla

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Decades ago, Greenwich Village (of which the West Village is a part) boasted many Spanish restaurants, many dating to the time of the Spanish Civil War and its aftermath. Now, Sevilla is one of the few that remain, a palace for paella where the waiters wear short tuxes, the decor will cast you back to the 1940s, and the chorizo arrives aflame. You can smell the garlic wafting down the street.

An aluminum pot with seafood, yellow rice, and bright red peppers.
Sevilla’s paella feeds two or three.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Little Taco House

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When they say little, they mean little. This closet of a space has only three stools, but the tacos are perfectly turned out, providing one of the neighborhood’s best budget meals. The gentle prices don’t mean this taqueria restricts its fillings, which include tongue and carnitas, in addition to grilled steak, fried fish, and for vegetarians, cactus. Burritos, quesadillas, nachos, and tortas are also available.

Three double tortilla tacos stuffed with meat and greenery and topped with red salsa
Three tacos at Little Taco House.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Perry St

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This modest project in Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s sprawling empire was founded in 2005, serving an international take on French cuisine with a casual edge, with dishes like yellowfin tuna burger with yuzu sauce, grilled lamb chops with black olive crumbs, and orecchiette with charred sweet corn. The views of Jersey and the Hudson River from the outdoor terrace are unsurpassed.

Fancy fried chicken in a yellow habanero sauce surrounded by a ring of leaves
Chicken in habanero sauce at Perry St.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Empellón Taqueria

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For creative Mexican fare, check out Empellon Taqueria from chef Alex Stupak, which sports a cocktail lounge in front and a dining room in back. The taco fillings may seem unusual to some, but many are also awesome, including shaved Brussels sprouts with toasted almonds and lamb-rib barbacoa.

A flat tortilla with chunks of red meat and a salsa that looks like fish eggs.
Sometime-special pastrami taco with mustard seed salsa at Empellón Taqueria.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

El Jalapeño Truck

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This bright orange-and-green van has become a fixture on the south side of Sheridan Square, where you can eat your purchases next to the stark white “Gay Liberation” sculpture by George Segal in what is now a national park. The tacos are good, for sure, with the usual fillings running from steak carne asada to the more uncommon ox tongue. Even better are the burritos, finished on the flattop till the flour tortilla wrappers warm, brown, and bubble.

A burrito browned on the outside cut in half and oozing cheese and meat.
Carne enchilada burrito from El Jalapeño.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Jeju Noodle Bar

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Douglas Kim’s stylish Korean noodle parlor Jeju Noodle Bar serves up the Korean version of ramen, known as ramyun. These wavy noodles are dense and of high quality. One dark and tall bowl called “so-ramyun” features a beefy broth made from veal bones. Pieces of brisket and raw steak are dropped in the broth, as pickled garlic, fried garlic, and garlic oil ramp up the flavor. The exterior of the restaurant recalls Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks,” but it’s not the original — his real inspiration was a now-demolished diner at Greenwich Avenue and Seventh Avenue South.

A well windowed facade with a couple of figures walking by and a red awning.
The exterior of Jeju plays off its resemblance to Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks”
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Suprema Provisions

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With entrances on both Bleecker Street and Seventh Avenue South, this ungainly space is long, crooked, and narrow, part of which is devoted to Italian groceries. But as the restaurant has increasingly become a hit, more of the space has been devoted to tables. At night, the dining room is dark and noisy, with a lively bar scene. The menu features impressive pastas and salads appropriate to the season, and a hamburger that seems out of place, but is commendable nonetheless. Mixed drinks are available, in addition to a modest wine list.

A storefront at night, with illuminated hams in the window and three shadowy figures passing outside.
Suprema Provisions by night.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Taco Mahal

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It’s a great place for a quick bite, but in good weather the sidewalk seating area at the corner of Bleecker and Seventh Avenue South proves excellent for people watching. The spare menu of this northern Indian café is flatbread “tacos,” including one made with a small roti and another with a big puffy naan. The less-starchy roti is the way to go, it can hold a substantial serving of palak paneer, lamb curry, crumbed and fried salmon, chickpeas, or chicken kebab. The palak paneer (spinach with cubed fresh cheese) is a favorite.

Two colorful Indian tacos made with thick naan bread.
Palak paneer tacos on naan.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Brazilian Chinese expat Jupira Lee founded Casa in 1998, and it quickly became a Village staple, located in perhaps the most picturesque part of the neighborhood. The interior is something like a farmhouse, and the centerpiece of the menu is feijoada, a black bean stew loaded with pork, served with sides that include orange segments, collard greens, polished rice, and farofa (a condiment of toasted yuca meal). Further menu highlights, some with African influences, feature shrimp and other seafood.

A cast iron pot of beans and plate of rice, toasted yuca meal, and shredded kale.
Casa’s Feijoada, the Brazilian national dish.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Sushi 456

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Sushi 456 recently replaced the legendary Takashi, a restaurant specializing in grilled meat yakiniku, including steaks and organ meats. Sushi 456 offers high-quality sushi at slightly reduced prices from the omakase institutions in the immediate vicinity. There are virtually no apps, with the exception of miso soup, edamame, and broiled tuna collar, and sushi assortments are in the $50 to $100 range.

Sushi lined up in three rows, with lots of mellow reds and yellows.
The cheapest of the sushi assortments at Sushi 456.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Osteria Carlina

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This spot focuses on cuisine of Italy’s far north, centering on Turin. Its tables spill onto the sidewalk in the southwestern corner of the neighborhood. The go-to starter is vitello tonnato, a dish of thin veal slices with a smoothly pureed sauce of tuna decorated with caperberries. Follow up with a pasta like beet ravioli or a main course such as stuffed cuttlefish. The wine list isn’t cheap, but it has many estimable Italian wines, making this a great place for a celebratory meal.

Beige meat in a beige sauce with stem-on green caperberries.
Veal tonnato at Osteria Carlina.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Commerce Inn

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This is currently the quirkiest of the West Village restaurants, with a layout left over from a Portuguese bar of the 1960s, but with overtones of colonial Americana added. It represents the most recent experiment of restaurateurs Rita Sodi (I Sodi) and Jody Williams (Buvette), where they explore Shaker culture in an offhand sort of way. The cocktails are historic, and the food runs to roasted bone marrow, spoon pudding, melted cheese rarebit, beef tongue, poached leeks, and a marvelous roast chicken for two to share, plus many seasonal fruit and vegetable flourishes.

Two glistening and grilled slabs of meat with a dab of mayo and shredded purple slaw.
Poached tongue at the Commerce Inn.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Banter

This Australian cafe and coffee shop tucked right below the Meatpacking District provides what amounts to a brunch menu available all week long. The avocado toast is sent spinning in a Middle Eastern direction with za’atar, feta, and pumpkin seeds, and it can be accessorized with poached eggs and side meats. Mushroom wraps and fried chicken sandwiches are other options, but don’t go looking for a hamburger or ham sandwich at this quirky breakfast bistro.

A toast smeared green with seeds on top, and a poached egg in a small bowl and bacon on the side.
Avocado toast at Banter.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

A Salt & Battery

English fish and chips have rarely been done so well on these shores as at this shop with minimal seating, brought to you by the Tea & Sympathy folks. Dipped in beer batter, the fillets come out crisp (whether cod, haddock, whiting, or sole), and the shrimp and scallops aren’t bad, either. Sides include mushy peas, baked beans, curry sauce, bangers, and chips that are every bit as good as they need to be.

A wooden bench in front of a makeshift white facade with the name in block letters.
A bench sits out front of A Salt & Battery.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Lavaux Wine Bar

This unusual wine bar offers the products of a Swiss wine company located in the French-speaking part of the country, so it’s more of a winery showroom than restaurant. The decor is exceptionally pleasant (there’s a ski-resort gondola in one corner with a table inside), and the white wines made from the Swiss Chasselas grape are particularly notable. Overall, the food seems like an afterthought, though there’s no better place in town for fondue, and the charcuterie and cheese boards are also a good bet.

A hand holds a fork with a small potato being dipped in a cheese sauce.
Fondue at Lavaux Wine Bar.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Corner Bistro

Corner Bistro isn’t a bistro, but an Irish bar dating to 1961 with the requisite dark wood-paneling, brass rails, and musty beer smells, with a rear room that constitutes something of a neighborhood hideout. The place became famous in the ‘90s for its simple burgers and decent fries cooked in a small closet next to the bar, but in the ensuing decades, the quality declined. Based on a recent visit, I’m pleased to announce that the quality has soared to something like its original magnificence. There’s no better place to grab a beer on a weekday afternoon, when the place is nearly empty.

A beef patty on a bun with two slices of cheese melted over the top, with the top of the bun, lettuce, and tomato slice not yet applied.
The famed cheeseburger at Corner Bistro.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

St. Tropez

The wine list is exclusively French, with some bargains if you look carefully, including good glasses of Bordeaux — white or red — at modest prices. The food is Provençale, running from charcuterie to full-plate meals. The frisee salad is great, with more bacon than expected, while the crevettes a l’aioli — grilled shrimp with tarragon mayo — is creamy excellence on a plate. The place looks out on charming West Fourth Street right before it paradoxically crosses West 12th Street.

A salad of chickory with an egg on top and loads of bacon and greens around the periphery.
Frisee salad at St Tropez.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Mary Lane

The Mary Lane is a sleeper — a pleasant restaurant with a relaxing setting on a West Village side street known mainly to area residents. The restaurant describes itself as a farm-to-table place; while the dishes reflect this type of sourcing, the execution is often surprising, and many dishes have unexpected twists. An engaging shade of green, an asparagus soup comes with crab, smoked creme fraiche, and slivered almonds. Chicken cacciatore arrives ensconced in ravioli, with olives and swatches of crisp chicken skin.

A pea green soup with stuff floating in it.
Asparagus soup at Mary Lane.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Semma

In its exploration of southern Indian cooking, Semma is quite simply mind boggling, via chef Vijay Kumar, who was born in Tamil Nadu. Whether you stray into unfamiliar territory — the goat intestines served on a banana leaf are an example — or stick with curries with venison or lobster tail, you will enjoy subtle spice combinations and high-quality ingredients. The triangular gunpowder dosa is the best around.

A room with a white bar at the right and row of tables at the last, accented in orange.
Semma’s interior.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Morandi

I didn’t very much like Morandi when it opened right off Seventh Avenue South in 2007, but on a recent revisit, the food via the controversial Keith McNally was splendid. The pan-Italian menu features lively salads, fried artichokes, bruschetta, seafood fritto misto, hand-rolled pici with lemon and parmesan, and Sicilian meatballs. As an added plus, the place opens every day at 8 a.m. with espresso and Italian-leaning breakfast selections.

Three toasted with a bright green topping surmounted by ricotta.
Fava bean bruschetta at Morandi.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Cafe Panino Mucho Giusto

This is where West Villagers hang. A small sandwich shop with a friendly staff peddles sandwiches (try the chicken panino with generous slices of tomato and avocado), soups, breakfast pastries, beer, wine, and coffee beverages — the latter good and strong.

Three women sit around a wooden table with chalkboard menus behind and above them.
The afternoon scene at Cafe Panino Mucho Giusto.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Mary's Fish Camp

Part of a mini-fad of small neighborhood seafood joints at the turn of the century, Mary Redding’s restaurant takes a Florida fish camp as its theme, serving up exemplary chowders, fried fish sandwiches with haystack fries, lobster rolls, fish tacos, and even a bouillabaisse on a menu that’s constantly changing. The corner location is hedged with potted herbs and flowers, and many of the patrons live in the surrounding townhouses (For celebrity watchers: Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick live nearby).

A long white rectangular dish with cubed raw fish and capers and herbs on top.
Japanese yellowtail tiradito at Mary’s Fish Camp.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Sevilla

Decades ago, Greenwich Village (of which the West Village is a part) boasted many Spanish restaurants, many dating to the time of the Spanish Civil War and its aftermath. Now, Sevilla is one of the few that remain, a palace for paella where the waiters wear short tuxes, the decor will cast you back to the 1940s, and the chorizo arrives aflame. You can smell the garlic wafting down the street.

An aluminum pot with seafood, yellow rice, and bright red peppers.
Sevilla’s paella feeds two or three.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Little Taco House

When they say little, they mean little. This closet of a space has only three stools, but the tacos are perfectly turned out, providing one of the neighborhood’s best budget meals. The gentle prices don’t mean this taqueria restricts its fillings, which include tongue and carnitas, in addition to grilled steak, fried fish, and for vegetarians, cactus. Burritos, quesadillas, nachos, and tortas are also available.

Three double tortilla tacos stuffed with meat and greenery and topped with red salsa
Three tacos at Little Taco House.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Perry St

This modest project in Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s sprawling empire was founded in 2005, serving an international take on French cuisine with a casual edge, with dishes like yellowfin tuna burger with yuzu sauce, grilled lamb chops with black olive crumbs, and orecchiette with charred sweet corn. The views of Jersey and the Hudson River from the outdoor terrace are unsurpassed.

Fancy fried chicken in a yellow habanero sauce surrounded by a ring of leaves
Chicken in habanero sauce at Perry St.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Empellón Taqueria

For creative Mexican fare, check out Empellon Taqueria from chef Alex Stupak, which sports a cocktail lounge in front and a dining room in back. The taco fillings may seem unusual to some, but many are also awesome, including shaved Brussels sprouts with toasted almonds and lamb-rib barbacoa.

A flat tortilla with chunks of red meat and a salsa that looks like fish eggs.
Sometime-special pastrami taco with mustard seed salsa at Empellón Taqueria.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

El Jalapeño Truck

This bright orange-and-green van has become a fixture on the south side of Sheridan Square, where you can eat your purchases next to the stark white “Gay Liberation” sculpture by George Segal in what is now a national park. The tacos are good, for sure, with the usual fillings running from steak carne asada to the more uncommon ox tongue. Even better are the burritos, finished on the flattop till the flour tortilla wrappers warm, brown, and bubble.

A burrito browned on the outside cut in half and oozing cheese and meat.
Carne enchilada burrito from El Jalapeño.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

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Jeju Noodle Bar

Douglas Kim’s stylish Korean noodle parlor Jeju Noodle Bar serves up the Korean version of ramen, known as ramyun. These wavy noodles are dense and of high quality. One dark and tall bowl called “so-ramyun” features a beefy broth made from veal bones. Pieces of brisket and raw steak are dropped in the broth, as pickled garlic, fried garlic, and garlic oil ramp up the flavor. The exterior of the restaurant recalls Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks,” but it’s not the original — his real inspiration was a now-demolished diner at Greenwich Avenue and Seventh Avenue South.

A well windowed facade with a couple of figures walking by and a red awning.
The exterior of Jeju plays off its resemblance to Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks”
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Suprema Provisions

With entrances on both Bleecker Street and Seventh Avenue South, this ungainly space is long, crooked, and narrow, part of which is devoted to Italian groceries. But as the restaurant has increasingly become a hit, more of the space has been devoted to tables. At night, the dining room is dark and noisy, with a lively bar scene. The menu features impressive pastas and salads appropriate to the season, and a hamburger that seems out of place, but is commendable nonetheless. Mixed drinks are available, in addition to a modest wine list.

A storefront at night, with illuminated hams in the window and three shadowy figures passing outside.
Suprema Provisions by night.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Taco Mahal

It’s a great place for a quick bite, but in good weather the sidewalk seating area at the corner of Bleecker and Seventh Avenue South proves excellent for people watching. The spare menu of this northern Indian café is flatbread “tacos,” including one made with a small roti and another with a big puffy naan. The less-starchy roti is the way to go, it can hold a substantial serving of palak paneer, lamb curry, crumbed and fried salmon, chickpeas, or chicken kebab. The palak paneer (spinach with cubed fresh cheese) is a favorite.

Two colorful Indian tacos made with thick naan bread.
Palak paneer tacos on naan.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Casa

Brazilian Chinese expat Jupira Lee founded Casa in 1998, and it quickly became a Village staple, located in perhaps the most picturesque part of the neighborhood. The interior is something like a farmhouse, and the centerpiece of the menu is feijoada, a black bean stew loaded with pork, served with sides that include orange segments, collard greens, polished rice, and farofa (a condiment of toasted yuca meal). Further menu highlights, some with African influences, feature shrimp and other seafood.