clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
A cup of tiramisu sitting on a small white saucer placed on a wooden table.
Flora’s creamy tiramisu.
Flora

9 Places to Scoop Up Light and Airy Tiramisu in NYC

When it comes to this classic Italian dessert, there’s an important rule: the lighter the lift, the better the dessert

View as Map
Flora’s creamy tiramisu.
| Flora

Tiramisu is as ubiquitous on Italian menus as pasta. And just like pasta, not all tiramisu are equal. The key to success is in its name: “Tira mi su” translates literally to “lift me up”— wherein lies the secret. The lighter the lift, the better the dessert. And this is what makes tiramisu so coveted; it’s not an easy lift, so to speak. A great tiramisu floats; the others sink. The balance of flavors and texture has to be just right to achieve the sublime over the soggy. And, of course, only the best ingredients can allow for this sweet alchemy.

Tiramisu perfection can be found all around New York City. Here is a selective list of places where tiramisu bliss can be found at restaurants throughout the five boroughs.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
If you book a reservation through an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Tra Di Noi

Copy Link

Proving that tiramisu doesn’t have to be homemade to be a home run, this mom-and-pop trattoria in the Bronx imports its classic Italian dessert from the legendary company Bindi, who has been making pastries in Milano since 1946 — providing consistency and credibility to this signature dish from the motherland.

Settepani

Copy Link

This family-run Harlem restaurant has the advantage of having owners — who are bakers by trade — with its Brooklyn location being a destination for dolce lovers throughout the city. The secret to its tiramisu, according to chef Nino Settepani, is love and letting the layers settle overnight.

A close-up photo of a square serving of tiramisu set on a white plate.
Settepani’s tiramisu.
Settepani

Lucciola

Copy Link

This upscale, Upper West Side restaurant, inspired by the cuisine and atmosphere of Bologna, serves the favorite tiramisu in NYC of Ale Gambini, a Milanese-born chef and founder of the Tiramisu Academy in California, who says, “Chef Michele Massari makes an extraordinary tiramisu!”

Piccola Cucina

Copy Link

At all three locations of celebrated Sicilian chef Philip Guardione’s popular restaurants, the tiramisu includes a complete tableside assembly that is almost as fun to watch as it is to dig into the silky delicacy, which is presented in an overflowing coffee cup.

An orange cup filled with tiramisu and topped with brown cocoa powder.
Piccola Cucina’s tiramisu.
Piccola Cucina

Il Triangolo

Copy Link

This venerable Queens staple has remained a neighborhood favorite — even if the neighborhood, Corona, is no longer a predominantly Italian-American enclave — due, in part, to the homemade tiramisu made with locally-made ladyfingers dipped quickly in just-cooled espresso and ultimately topped with shreds of high-end dark chocolate from bars nearly worth their weight in gold.

A square of tiramisu drizzled in dark chocolate and set on a white plate.
Il Triangolo’s tiramisu.
Il Triangolo

Song' E Napule

Copy Link

This destination for Neapolitan pizza and pasta has amazing desserts, including a tiramisu in a small jar that is layered with care and the same emphasis on select ingredients, in this case imported mascarpone, that define the beloved savory menu. 

A mason jar filled with tiramisu set on a blue-ringed saucer.
Song’ E Napule’s tiramisu served in a jar.
Song’ E Napule

Bar Primi

Copy Link

Just like the pastas at this rustic East Village restaurant, the tiramisu is also handmade using family recipes— this one from that of chef Sal Lamboglia — with the “wait-and-see” approach of allowing the flavors to mingle overnight into a harmonious amalgam before serving.

The Richmond

Copy Link

This new American bistro on the Staten Island waterfront, from the team behind Bay Ridge’s popular Cebu, draws heavily from classic Italian fare. The desserts are the domain of inventive pastry chef Patrizia Lombardo, who adds caramelized bananas and a touch of rum (instead of marsala) with the other traditional ingredients.

This new regional Italian restaurant in South Slope, owned and operated by ebullient young owners from Campania, adds Amaretto cookies (spiked with almonds) right in the middle of its elegant tiramisu, which give it a bittersweet taste at the end. It’s a fine way to finish off a meal dedicated to the cuisine of Southern Italy.

A cup of tiramisu sitting on a small white saucer placed on a wooden table. Flora

Tra Di Noi

Proving that tiramisu doesn’t have to be homemade to be a home run, this mom-and-pop trattoria in the Bronx imports its classic Italian dessert from the legendary company Bindi, who has been making pastries in Milano since 1946 — providing consistency and credibility to this signature dish from the motherland.

Settepani

A close-up photo of a square serving of tiramisu set on a white plate.
Settepani’s tiramisu.
Settepani

This family-run Harlem restaurant has the advantage of having owners — who are bakers by trade — with its Brooklyn location being a destination for dolce lovers throughout the city. The secret to its tiramisu, according to chef Nino Settepani, is love and letting the layers settle overnight.

A close-up photo of a square serving of tiramisu set on a white plate.
Settepani’s tiramisu.
Settepani

Lucciola

This upscale, Upper West Side restaurant, inspired by the cuisine and atmosphere of Bologna, serves the favorite tiramisu in NYC of Ale Gambini, a Milanese-born chef and founder of the Tiramisu Academy in California, who says, “Chef Michele Massari makes an extraordinary tiramisu!”

Piccola Cucina

An orange cup filled with tiramisu and topped with brown cocoa powder.
Piccola Cucina’s tiramisu.
Piccola Cucina

At all three locations of celebrated Sicilian chef Philip Guardione’s popular restaurants, the tiramisu includes a complete tableside assembly that is almost as fun to watch as it is to dig into the silky delicacy, which is presented in an overflowing coffee cup.

An orange cup filled with tiramisu and topped with brown cocoa powder.
Piccola Cucina’s tiramisu.
Piccola Cucina

Il Triangolo

A square of tiramisu drizzled in dark chocolate and set on a white plate.
Il Triangolo’s tiramisu.
Il Triangolo

This venerable Queens staple has remained a neighborhood favorite — even if the neighborhood, Corona, is no longer a predominantly Italian-American enclave — due, in part, to the homemade tiramisu made with locally-made ladyfingers dipped quickly in just-cooled espresso and ultimately topped with shreds of high-end dark chocolate from bars nearly worth their weight in gold.

A square of tiramisu drizzled in dark chocolate and set on a white plate.
Il Triangolo’s tiramisu.
Il Triangolo

Song' E Napule

A mason jar filled with tiramisu set on a blue-ringed saucer.
Song’ E Napule’s tiramisu served in a jar.
Song’ E Napule

This destination for Neapolitan pizza and pasta has amazing desserts, including a tiramisu in a small jar that is layered with care and the same emphasis on select ingredients, in this case imported mascarpone, that define the beloved savory menu. 

A mason jar filled with tiramisu set on a blue-ringed saucer.
Song’ E Napule’s tiramisu served in a jar.
Song’ E Napule

Bar Primi

Just like the pastas at this rustic East Village restaurant, the tiramisu is also handmade using family recipes— this one from that of chef Sal Lamboglia — with the “wait-and-see” approach of allowing the flavors to mingle overnight into a harmonious amalgam before serving.

The Richmond

This new American bistro on the Staten Island waterfront, from the team behind Bay Ridge’s popular Cebu, draws heavily from classic Italian fare. The desserts are the domain of inventive pastry chef Patrizia Lombardo, who adds caramelized bananas and a touch of rum (instead of marsala) with the other traditional ingredients.

Flora

A cup of tiramisu sitting on a small white saucer placed on a wooden table. Flora

This new regional Italian restaurant in South Slope, owned and operated by ebullient young owners from Campania, adds Amaretto cookies (spiked with almonds) right in the middle of its elegant tiramisu, which give it a bittersweet taste at the end. It’s a fine way to finish off a meal dedicated to the cuisine of Southern Italy.

A cup of tiramisu sitting on a small white saucer placed on a wooden table. Flora

Related Maps