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A corner location with a series of rounded green awnings.
Taiwanese Specialities, the Elmhurst old-veteran eatery.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

14 Exceptional Taiwanese Restaurants in NYC

Noodles, pork chops, lu wei, and bubble tea

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Taiwanese Specialities, the Elmhurst old-veteran eatery.
| Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

While a decade ago there were only a few restaurants in NYC identified with Taiwanese cuisine, now there are dozens. The menus offer a mix of regional Chinese fare, plus, for geographic and historical reasons, dishes showing Japanese, Korean, American, European, and Southeast Asian influences. Culinary wonders may include dishes favoring pork chops, chicken with basil, elliptical rice cakes, crisp tempura, hearty (and often spicy) noodle soups, oyster omelets, and pickled mustard greens in varying roles. Bubble tea may be the island’s most popular export, invented in Taichung, Taiwan in the 1980s, and quickly becoming a food fad in Hong Kong, Tokyo, and the rest of the world.

Taiwanese food is being further remade in the modern era. “It’s because young Taiwanese don’t always want to eat the food of their parents,” says Cathy Erway, author of The Food of Taiwan. She points to new steakhouses, bubble tea parlors, vendors of newfangled ice creams, and fast food outlets concentrating on things like dumplings and popcorn chicken, as evidence of this trend. Here is a choice collection of the city’s best Taiwanese restaurants, old and new.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Ho Ho Té

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Just west of Times Square, Ho Ho Té is a stand-alone bubble tea spot with exceptional-quality beverages and a pleasant outdoor table or two where you can watch the passing tourist parade. Fruit drinks and slushies are a particular specialty, ice-cold, delivered in a variety of sizes. The subsidiary food fare runs to popcorn chicken, Taiwanese sausages, and eel or pork chop over rice.

A carton of fried chicken tidbits next to an orange colored clear beverage.
Popcorn chicken and orange drink.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Four Four South Village

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This sleek noodle parlor in downtown Flushing specializes in spicy beef soup noodles, available in a dozen permutations, some involving a tomato-based broth — and when the menu says spicy, it means spicy. Beef rolls, popcorn chicken, greens, and lu wei (meats and vegetables that are fast-braised in a soy-based sauce) are also available. And there’s a newer branch in the East Village.

A bowl of fiery red broth and noodles in the middle being lifted up by chopsticks.
Four Four’s spicy noodles are indeed spicy.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Stick To My Pot

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Dumpling, dumplings, and more dumplings, either fried or steamed, is the focus of this farinaceous fast-food parlor equidistant from Penn Station and Macy’s. The menu also includes pork-stuffed bao, spring rolls, and sweet mochi cakes, with a few more substantial specials taped to the tiled walls — sometimes including beef noodles.

A narrow storefront with a blue and white sign above.
Stick To My Pot in the Garment Center.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Main Street Taiwanese Gourmet

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Flushing’s Main Street just north of the Long Island Expressway is a hotbed of Taiwanese eats and this humble coffee shop is your best choice. In addition to the usual three-cup chicken and oyster omelets, it offers a series of small dishes in a competing tradition not unlike dim sum. Also known as meatball mochi (thanks to Cathy Erway), ba wan is one of these, a wonderful small bowl of starch in which tidbits of pork are implanted, and what could make a better brunch snack?

Goo with spots of meat and gravy in a blue Delft bowl.
The “Taiwanese hamburger” at Main Street.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Happy Stony Noodle

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Decorated with black-and-white photos of agrarian scenes, this happy-go-lucky spot specializes in noodle soups, offered with a choice of noodles (our favorite: wide rice noodles), many featuring beef and some spicy as hell. But the menu doesn’t stop there. Other offerings include sweet-potato french fries, chicken cutlets, oyster and radish pancakes, squid balls, and fluffy sweet buns drizzled with sweetened condensed milk.

A reddish broth teeming with noodles and chunks of beef.
Spicy beef noodle soup at Happy Stony.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

DiDi Dumpling

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DiDi Dumpling specializes in elongated, thin-skinned pot stickers stuffed with pork, chicken, or vegetables and griddle-fried in the popular stuck-together style. Other highlights of the brief menu include lo mein and hot-and-sour soup, offered in a room with a stylish fast-food ambiance.

A bunch of brown dumplings stuck together side-by-side.
Didi’s conjoined Taiwanese pork dumplings.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Taiwanese Specialties

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This is one of the city’s oldest and most venerated Taiwanese restaurants, and it fills up with extended families in the evenings and on the weekends. It’s a good place to try the dish of ground pork and garlic chives known as fly’s heads, sauteed kidneys, stinky tofu, steamed whole fish, rice-cake stir-fries, and Taiwanese three-cup chicken. Cash only.

Ground meat and deep green minced chives in a bowl.
Fly heads (pork with yellow chives).
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This offshoot (or maybe updating) of 886 brings Taiwanese food in large format dishes to Greenpoint. While it doesn’t neglect classics like three-cup chicken and fly’s head on conventional size servings, it also brings dishes like whole fish littered with yellow chives and a pork-belly-and-cuttlefish braise.

An overhead photograph of a chicken that’s been fried whole and dissected into parts with its talons still on.
BDSM chicken at Wenwen.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Located smack-dab in the middle of the riotous St. Marks scene, 886 takes a playful and informal approach to Taiwanese food. Popcorn fried chicken kicks the dish up a notch with a honey glaze, sweet potato fries come sprinkled with plum powder, beef noodles are proffered in dry form, and stir fries might contain bacon and cabbage or pea shoots and tofu skin. Traditional dishes like fly’s heads and three-cup chicken are also available on the ambitious menu.

Multiple dishes seen from overhead with a bottle pouring sake.
Sake and beer are available at 886.
Gary He/Eater NY

May Wah Fast Food

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This modest carryout offers homestyle Taiwanese dishes: The black pepper pork chops are prodigal, massive, perfectly cooked so that they’re still moist, and drenched in an agreeable brown gravy. Thick, udon-like noodles are heaped with big beef chunks, with a wad of pickled mustard greens on top, in an exemplary version of the fabled beef noodles. Food is abundant and inexpensive.

A pork chop with gravy over rice held in front of a window in Soho.
Black pepper pork chops at May Wah.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Taiwan Pork Chop House

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This utilitarian cafe in Chinatown provides a snapshot of traditional Taiwanese fare. It begins with a series of bargain, over-rice meals and extends to soups and stir-fries that offer a choice of noodles, with rice cakes in a separate section. Start out with pork chop and rice, an immensely satisfying meal that also includes ground pork sauce and pickled greens, with a pair of well-seasoned chops thrown on top.

White sign, green lettering.
TPCH is on picturesque Doyers Street.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Win Son

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Located in a corner of Williamsburg, Win Son is a stylish bistro with colorful murals and chandeliers made from plastic bottles, boasting a lively bar at the far end of the room. It seeks to remake Taiwanese food for neophytes and aficionados alike, and handily succeeds while being faithful to the originals. Fly’s heads, oyster omelets, and scallion pancakes are especially recommended.

A fanned collection of pastry triangles with a spicy looking dipping sauce.
Scallion pancakes at Win Son.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

New Fu Shen

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Beautifully grilled sirloins, rib-eyes, and pork chops are served on a bed of spaghetti, on a sizzling platter with a fried egg and mixed vegetables at this restaurant. This main course is preceded by a salad and toasts smeared with sweetened condensed milk. The steak prices are mind-bogglingly low for good-quality meat.

Rib eye steak at New Fu Shen
Sizzling steak at New Fu Shen

ViVi Bubble Tea

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Vivi is New York City’s own home-grown bubble tea parlor, founded by Tony Lu in 2007. The chain here has now grown to over 20 stores, including locations in Queens, Staten Island, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. It also provides typical Taiwanese snacks that can be assembled to make a meal. Check out the bright red Taiwanese pork sausages skewered on sticks, or the steamed dumplings filled with a savory mixture of pork and shrimp. And Vivi claims its popcorn chicken (breaded, deep-fried tidbits) is the best in town.

Oblong steamed dumplings with a dipping sauce, and stubby red sausages.
Dumplings and Taiwanese sausages at Vivi.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ho Ho Té

A carton of fried chicken tidbits next to an orange colored clear beverage.
Popcorn chicken and orange drink.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Just west of Times Square, Ho Ho Té is a stand-alone bubble tea spot with exceptional-quality beverages and a pleasant outdoor table or two where you can watch the passing tourist parade. Fruit drinks and slushies are a particular specialty, ice-cold, delivered in a variety of sizes. The subsidiary food fare runs to popcorn chicken, Taiwanese sausages, and eel or pork chop over rice.

A carton of fried chicken tidbits next to an orange colored clear beverage.
Popcorn chicken and orange drink.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Four Four South Village

A bowl of fiery red broth and noodles in the middle being lifted up by chopsticks.
Four Four’s spicy noodles are indeed spicy.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This sleek noodle parlor in downtown Flushing specializes in spicy beef soup noodles, available in a dozen permutations, some involving a tomato-based broth — and when the menu says spicy, it means spicy. Beef rolls, popcorn chicken, greens, and lu wei (meats and vegetables that are fast-braised in a soy-based sauce) are also available. And there’s a newer branch in the East Village.

A bowl of fiery red broth and noodles in the middle being lifted up by chopsticks.
Four Four’s spicy noodles are indeed spicy.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Stick To My Pot

A narrow storefront with a blue and white sign above.
Stick To My Pot in the Garment Center.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Dumpling, dumplings, and more dumplings, either fried or steamed, is the focus of this farinaceous fast-food parlor equidistant from Penn Station and Macy’s. The menu also includes pork-stuffed bao, spring rolls, and sweet mochi cakes, with a few more substantial specials taped to the tiled walls — sometimes including beef noodles.

A narrow storefront with a blue and white sign above.
Stick To My Pot in the Garment Center.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Main Street Taiwanese Gourmet

Goo with spots of meat and gravy in a blue Delft bowl.
The “Taiwanese hamburger” at Main Street.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Flushing’s Main Street just north of the Long Island Expressway is a hotbed of Taiwanese eats and this humble coffee shop is your best choice. In addition to the usual three-cup chicken and oyster omelets, it offers a series of small dishes in a competing tradition not unlike dim sum. Also known as meatball mochi (thanks to Cathy Erway), ba wan is one of these, a wonderful small bowl of starch in which tidbits of pork are implanted, and what could make a better brunch snack?

Goo with spots of meat and gravy in a blue Delft bowl.
The “Taiwanese hamburger” at Main Street.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Happy Stony Noodle

A reddish broth teeming with noodles and chunks of beef.
Spicy beef noodle soup at Happy Stony.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Decorated with black-and-white photos of agrarian scenes, this happy-go-lucky spot specializes in noodle soups, offered with a choice of noodles (our favorite: wide rice noodles), many featuring beef and some spicy as hell. But the menu doesn’t stop there. Other offerings include sweet-potato french fries, chicken cutlets, oyster and radish pancakes, squid balls, and fluffy sweet buns drizzled with sweetened condensed milk.

A reddish broth teeming with noodles and chunks of beef.
Spicy beef noodle soup at Happy Stony.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

DiDi Dumpling

A bunch of brown dumplings stuck together side-by-side.
Didi’s conjoined Taiwanese pork dumplings.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

DiDi Dumpling specializes in elongated, thin-skinned pot stickers stuffed with pork, chicken, or vegetables and griddle-fried in the popular stuck-together style. Other highlights of the brief menu include lo mein and hot-and-sour soup, offered in a room with a stylish fast-food ambiance.

A bunch of brown dumplings stuck together side-by-side.
Didi’s conjoined Taiwanese pork dumplings.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Taiwanese Specialties

Ground meat and deep green minced chives in a bowl.
Fly heads (pork with yellow chives).
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This is one of the city’s oldest and most venerated Taiwanese restaurants, and it fills up with extended families in the evenings and on the weekends. It’s a good place to try the dish of ground pork and garlic chives known as fly’s heads, sauteed kidneys, stinky tofu, steamed whole fish, rice-cake stir-fries, and Taiwanese three-cup chicken. Cash only.

Ground meat and deep green minced chives in a bowl.
Fly heads (pork with yellow chives).
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Wenwen

An overhead photograph of a chicken that’s been fried whole and dissected into parts with its talons still on.
BDSM chicken at Wenwen.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

This offshoot (or maybe updating) of 886 brings Taiwanese food in large format dishes to Greenpoint. While it doesn’t neglect classics like three-cup chicken and fly’s head on conventional size servings, it also brings dishes like whole fish littered with yellow chives and a pork-belly-and-cuttlefish braise.

An overhead photograph of a chicken that’s been fried whole and dissected into parts with its talons still on.
BDSM chicken at Wenwen.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

886

Multiple dishes seen from overhead with a bottle pouring sake.
Sake and beer are available at 886.
Gary He/Eater NY

Located smack-dab in the middle of the riotous St. Marks scene, 886 takes a playful and informal approach to Taiwanese food. Popcorn fried chicken kicks the dish up a notch with a honey glaze, sweet potato fries come sprinkled with plum powder, beef noodles are proffered in dry form, and stir fries might contain bacon and cabbage or pea shoots and tofu skin. Traditional dishes like fly’s heads and three-cup chicken are also available on the ambitious menu.

Multiple dishes seen from overhead with a bottle pouring sake.
Sake and beer are available at 886.
Gary He/Eater NY

May Wah Fast Food

A pork chop with gravy over rice held in front of a window in Soho.
Black pepper pork chops at May Wah.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This modest carryout offers homestyle Taiwanese dishes: The black pepper pork chops are prodigal, massive, perfectly cooked so that they’re still moist, and drenched in an agreeable brown gravy. Thick, udon-like noodles are heaped with big beef chunks, with a wad of pickled mustard greens on top, in an exemplary version of the fabled beef noodles. Food is abundant and inexpensive.

A pork chop with gravy over rice held in front of a window in Soho.
Black pepper pork chops at May Wah.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Taiwan Pork Chop House

White sign, green lettering.
TPCH is on picturesque Doyers Street.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This utilitarian cafe in Chinatown provides a snapshot of traditional Taiwanese fare. It begins with a series of bargain, over-rice meals and extends to soups and stir-fries that offer a choice of noodles, with rice cakes in a separate section. Start out with pork chop and rice, an immensely satisfying meal that also includes ground pork sauce and pickled greens, with a pair of well-seasoned chops thrown on top.

White sign, green lettering.
TPCH is on picturesque Doyers Street.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Win Son

A fanned collection of pastry triangles with a spicy looking dipping sauce.
Scallion pancakes at Win Son.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Located in a corner of Williamsburg, Win Son is a stylish bistro with colorful murals and chandeliers made from plastic bottles, boasting a lively bar at the far end of the room. It seeks to remake Taiwanese food for neophytes and aficionados alike, and handily succeeds while being faithful to the originals. Fly’s heads, oyster omelets, and scallion pancakes are especially recommended.

A fanned collection of pastry triangles with a spicy looking dipping sauce.
Scallion pancakes at Win Son.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

New Fu Shen

Rib eye steak at New Fu Shen
Sizzling steak at New Fu Shen

Beautifully grilled sirloins, rib-eyes, and pork chops are served on a bed of spaghetti, on a sizzling platter with a fried egg and mixed vegetables at this restaurant. This main course is preceded by a salad and toasts smeared with sweetened condensed milk. The steak prices are mind-bogglingly low for good-quality meat.

Rib eye steak at New Fu Shen
Sizzling steak at New Fu Shen

ViVi Bubble Tea

Oblong steamed dumplings with a dipping sauce, and stubby red sausages.
Dumplings and Taiwanese sausages at Vivi.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Vivi is New York City’s own home-grown bubble tea parlor, founded by Tony Lu in 2007. The chain here has now grown to over 20 stores, including locations in Queens, Staten Island, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. It also provides typical Taiwanese snacks that can be assembled to make a meal. Check out the bright red Taiwanese pork sausages skewered on sticks, or the steamed dumplings filled with a savory mixture of pork and shrimp. And Vivi claims its popcorn chicken (breaded, deep-fried tidbits) is the best in town.

Oblong steamed dumplings with a dipping sauce, and stubby red sausages.
Dumplings and Taiwanese sausages at Vivi.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

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