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An assortment of raw fish and six pieces of sushi next to ginger and wasabi
UOGASHI
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Where to Eat Sushi Omakase for Under $125 in NYC

High-quality fish, without exorbitant pricing

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UOGASHI
| Robert Sietsema/Eater

Ultra-luxe, ultra-exclusive omakases are well-known in New York City — but when working with a Prosecco, rather than Champagne, budget, don’t despair. There are numerous excellent and more reasonably priced omakase options all over the city. Sushi devotees seeking budget omakase experiences can choose from LA imports, New York-born chainlets, shops that fly product in from Tokyo, and more, with restaurants offering set meals for under $125.

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Uogashi

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There are three omakase options at Uogashi, whose original East Village location burned to the ground in October 2018 and quietly reopened in a new Theater District location in 2019. The restaurant is owned by a Japanese conglomerate that also includes a fish supplier in its holding, which is what allows Uogashi to serve quite high quality fish at a relatively low price point. While the new location isn’t anything fancy decor-wise, the sushi selection makes up for it. Choose from a $95, $135, or $175 omakase; a reservation is required for the last offering. 

An assortment of raw fish and six pieces of sushi next to ginger and wasabi
A $45 plate of sushi at UOGASHI
Robert Sietsema/Eater

Kakurega Sushi

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The quality and craftsmanship of the omakase at the intimate, fairly upscale Kakurega in Flushing is on par with that offered by well-known Manhattan restaurants. Kakurega’s omakase offers three price points: $98 for 14 courses, including four appetizers, eight pieces of sushi, miso soup, and a dessert; $138 for 17 courses, including five appetizers, nine pieces of sushi, a handroll, miso soup, and a dessert; and $168 for 16 courses, including six appetizers, eight premium pieces of sushi, miso soup and a dessert. There are two seatings nightly, at 6:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. The sushi bar seats 13, and there are also three small tables with four seats each and two larger tables with eight seats each.

Hatsuhana

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This restaurant with two Midtown East locations has been serving sushi and sashimi since 1976. At least 25 percent of the fish is flown in twice a week from Tokyo’s fish markets, and local stock is delivered daily. There are two nigiri omakase choices: $100 for 16 pieces and $120 for 18 pieces.

Sushi on Jones

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The Sushi on Jones chainlet is New York City’s first al fresco omakase bar. All locations — West Village, Urbanspace on Vanderbilt, Gotham West Market — offer a traditional 12-piece sushi tastings in 30 minutes for $58, though only the Bowery Market outpost is outdoors. While this is a no-frills experience, it still offers good sushi at a reasonable price point, and thanks to the truncated length, Sushi on Jones’s omakase is easy to squeeze in as an after-work dinner. But when in the market for a more expansive experience, the West 10th location also offers a twenty course omakase for $105.

Mojo Omakase

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This new 12-seat spot offers a $65 omakase with 12 courses, including two appetizers and 10 pieces of chef’s choice nigiri. Ingredients come from sea markets in Japan, and diners can expect uni, wagyu, foie gras, several types of toro, and more during the omakase. At the end of the meal, those who want more may add items on an a la carte basis. Those who’d prefer a sweet finish to their meal can also choose from a variety of mochi flavors, including matcha, salted caramel, and vanilla chip.

Omakase by Teisui

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There are three omakase options at this former izakaya in the Flatiron district. Led by Kazunobu Taguchi, an experienced chef who has worked in both the U.S. and Japan, this small restaurant serves high-quality sushi with a side of education: The menu includes information about the fish’s sourcing. Notably, it uses red vinegar (akazu), which many consider to be the vinegar of choice for traditional Edomae sushi, for its sushi rice. The lite omakase option ($48) includes seven pieces of sushi and one hand roll, while the regular $60 option includes 11 pieces of sushi and a hand roll. Finally, the largest, the Teisui omakase ($85), includes 16 pieces of sushi and a hand roll. There are also kosher options at the same price points.

Sushi Daizen

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The casual Sushi Daizen is one of the few places in the Long Island City area offering omakase. It comes at two price points: $75 for a three-dish appetizer, soup, 10 pieces of nigiri, and a handroll, or a $90 option with both sushi and sashimi. Menu highlights include a spot shrimp, Santa Barbara sea urchin, kawa kawa from Japan, and a fatty tuna hand roll studded with scallions, though menu items vary by season. There are 10 seats at the counter for omakase, as well as four smaller tables and one larger in the dining area seating an additional 20 or so diners.

Sugarfish

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Sugarfish by Sushi Nozawa is an LA-based chain with two New York City locations (Flatiron and Soho) that serves traditional sushi styled by esteemed chef Kazunori Nozawa. The restaurant’s formula is simple: There are four sets of “Trust Me” menus, each of which starts with edamame and a small cup of tuna sashimi, followed by sushi and hand rolls. Options range from the smallest Trust Me Lite ($23), which includes four pieces of nigiri and a hand roll, to the Don’t Think. Just Trust Me ($63), which comes with two pieces of sashimi, 12 pieces of nigiri, and two hand rolls. Warning: The wait time for walk-ins can be long.

An eight-piece sushi roll sits next to a side of edamame
Sugarfish
Eater Video

Sushi By Bae

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Sushi by Bae is a six-seat counter that originally started as a sister pop-up to Sushi by Bou in 2017. The omakase costs $125, and there are three seatings each evening (6:00 p.m., 7:30 p.m, and 9:00 p.m.). Come here for an accessible, casual vibe that seeks to make omakase accessible. Owner Oona Tempest — a U.S.-trained chef who stands out as a woman in a world that’s dominated by Japanese chefs who trained in Japan — is chatty and more than happy to answer highly technical questions about the service.

Omakase Room by Maaser

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This 14-seat BYOB spot in the West Village sources its fish from Tokyo’s world-renowned fish vendors in Sakasyu. Selections fly into New York three times a week for the restaurant’s Edomae-style sushi, employing traditional techniques such as aging, konbu-jime (a technique used for briefly curing fish between two slices of kombu seaweed and refrigerating), and occasional charcoal grilling and smoking. Its 17-piece omakase is $125, and the meal lasts 75 minutes.

Kanoyama

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This Michelin-starred Little Tokyo spot offers a $125 omakase seating 12 people Tuesday through Saturday every week. Chef Nobuyuki Shikanai serves omakase in a celebratory, upbeat manner; each bite is displayed in Shikanai’s cupped hands for diners to take with their fingers. Past menu highlights have included cherry trout hakozushi and jackfish with grains of Icelandic sea salt and lemon; however, as the menu is highly seasonal, note that selections change on a daily basis.

This casual East Village institution, which seats 10 people at the counter for omakase and another 30 or so in the dining room, has been around since 1984. It offers three sushi omakase options: a $60 “traditional” option with nine pieces of sushi and one roll in its classic style, a $80 “special” option with 12 pieces of seasonal fish sushi and one roll, and a $110 “premium” option incorporating wagyu and truffle with 12 pieces of sushi and one roll. It also offers two sashimi omakases — a $65 deluxe sashimi and a $140 premium sashimi for two — as well as combination options, including a $150 sushi and sashimi for two.

Sushi by M

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This is unfussy yet intimate spot offers chef Tim Lin’s playful take on the omakase experience. It focuses on unique flavor profiles and unexpected combinations such as the Big Mac (an $18 extravaganza with chopped toro, seared toro, wagyu, and two types of uni stacked inside a piece of seaweed). Choose from two omakase choices: a $50 option (12 pieces) and a $95 option (19 pieces). A la carte pieces, which range in price from about $8 to $20, can also be added. Menus change on a weekly basis based on fish availability, but can be reliably counted on to offer things like hamachi, tuna, uni and toro. Each omakase seating is capped at 12 seats per session.

View this post on Instagram

Friday night fun night.... let’s go for party!!!!!

A post shared by Sushi by m (@sushi_by_m) on

Sushi Dojo

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There are four omakase choices at this East Village serving a modern take on omakase. The smallest starts at $65 for 12 pieces of chef’s choice sushi. Choices then go up to $75 for the Dojo omakase (eight premium sushi and a king salmon hand roll), $95 for 15 pieces of chef’s choice sushi and a hand roll, and $125 for the chef’s choice of sushi and sashimi. Unlike more traditional omakase places, Sushi Dojo incorporates nontraditional elements such as foie gras, gold leaf, and truffle into some of its offerings. The ambiance — which resembles that of a house party more than that of a traditional, somber sushi joint — is more laid back and relaxed than that of many other places with comparable omakases in the city. Note: The $65 and $75 omakase choices aren’t available at the sushi counter.

Ume Williamsburg

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The traditional omakase at this minimalist Williamsburg spot features 15 pieces of seasonal sushi for $83, as well as a $65 signature sushi set featuring seasonal fish and vegetables. For the latter meal, rather than offering a traditional omakase experience where a chef assembles all the food for the diner, Ume provides diners boards with the sushi elements — fish, rice and nori — in disassembled form alongside a parade of unique salts such as ghost-pepper or truffle sea salt. Diners then have the flexibility to craft their own combinations of seaweed, fish, rice and seasoning.

View this post on Instagram

Never too much oyster.

A post shared by Ume Williamsburg (@ume.williamsburg) on

Sushi Yashin

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Sushi Yashin is a low-key, 20-seat spot that offers a 12-piece omakase for $85, and some weeks, this is reduced to a 10-piece omakase for $78. There is also a market price open-style omakase, where the price varies depending on the number of courses ordered by the customer; generally people order about 12 pieces for $85. Reservations are required for all omakases because they aren’t available every day, so plan accordingly.

Katsuei

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Sushi Katsuei’s under 50-seat original Park Slope location is a neighborhood favorite that opened in 2014 and spearheaded the elevation of sushi in Brooklyn. Prior to Sushi Katsuei’s opening, few — if any — Brooklyn sushi bars could credible claim to rise above neighborhood stalwart status. Sushi Katsuei’s reasonably priced menu offers a $52 omakase with nine pieces of nigiri. Its newer West Village location is a touch pricier at $60 for the omakase experience, but it includes a toro scallion hand roll in addition to the nine pieces of nigiri. Both locations serve Edomae sushi with a modern twist, and much of the fish served at Sushi Katsuei is flown in from the famed Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo.

A piece of red sushi over rice is topped with green paste
Sushi Katsuei’s $60 omakase
Stefanie Tuder/Eater

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Uogashi

There are three omakase options at Uogashi, whose original East Village location burned to the ground in October 2018 and quietly reopened in a new Theater District location in 2019. The restaurant is owned by a Japanese conglomerate that also includes a fish supplier in its holding, which is what allows Uogashi to serve quite high quality fish at a relatively low price point. While the new location isn’t anything fancy decor-wise, the sushi selection makes up for it. Choose from a $95, $135, or $175 omakase; a reservation is required for the last offering. 

An assortment of raw fish and six pieces of sushi next to ginger and wasabi
A $45 plate of sushi at UOGASHI
Robert Sietsema/Eater

Kakurega Sushi

The quality and craftsmanship of the omakase at the intimate, fairly upscale Kakurega in Flushing is on par with that offered by well-known Manhattan restaurants. Kakurega’s omakase offers three price points: $98 for 14 courses, including four appetizers, eight pieces of sushi, miso soup, and a dessert; $138 for 17 courses, including five appetizers, nine pieces of sushi, a handroll, miso soup, and a dessert; and $168 for 16 courses, including six appetizers, eight premium pieces of sushi, miso soup and a dessert. There are two seatings nightly, at 6:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. The sushi bar seats 13, and there are also three small tables with four seats each and two larger tables with eight seats each.

Hatsuhana

This restaurant with two Midtown East locations has been serving sushi and sashimi since 1976. At least 25 percent of the fish is flown in twice a week from Tokyo’s fish markets, and local stock is delivered daily. There are two nigiri omakase choices: $100 for 16 pieces and $120 for 18 pieces.

Sushi on Jones

The Sushi on Jones chainlet is New York City’s first al fresco omakase bar. All locations — West Village, Urbanspace on Vanderbilt, Gotham West Market — offer a traditional 12-piece sushi tastings in 30 minutes for $58, though only the Bowery Market outpost is outdoors. While this is a no-frills experience, it still offers good sushi at a reasonable price point, and thanks to the truncated length, Sushi on Jones’s omakase is easy to squeeze in as an after-work dinner. But when in the market for a more expansive experience, the West 10th location also offers a twenty course omakase for $105.

Mojo Omakase

This new 12-seat spot offers a $65 omakase with 12 courses, including two appetizers and 10 pieces of chef’s choice nigiri. Ingredients come from sea markets in Japan, and diners can expect uni, wagyu, foie gras, several types of toro, and more during the omakase. At the end of the meal, those who want more may add items on an a la carte basis. Those who’d prefer a sweet finish to their meal can also choose from a variety of mochi flavors, including matcha, salted caramel, and vanilla chip.

Omakase by Teisui

There are three omakase options at this former izakaya in the Flatiron district. Led by Kazunobu Taguchi, an experienced chef who has worked in both the U.S. and Japan, this small restaurant serves high-quality sushi with a side of education: The menu includes information about the fish’s sourcing. Notably, it uses red vinegar (akazu), which many consider to be the vinegar of choice for traditional Edomae sushi, for its sushi rice. The lite omakase option ($48) includes seven pieces of sushi and one hand roll, while the regular $60 option includes 11 pieces of sushi and a hand roll. Finally, the largest, the Teisui omakase ($85), includes 16 pieces of sushi and a hand roll. There are also kosher options at the same price points.

Sushi Daizen

The casual Sushi Daizen is one of the few places in the Long Island City area offering omakase. It comes at two price points: $75 for a three-dish appetizer, soup, 10 pieces of nigiri, and a handroll, or a $90 option with both sushi and sashimi. Menu highlights include a spot shrimp, Santa Barbara sea urchin, kawa kawa from Japan, and a fatty tuna hand roll studded with scallions, though menu items vary by season. There are 10 seats at the counter for omakase, as well as four smaller tables and one larger in the dining area seating an additional 20 or so diners.

Sugarfish

Sugarfish by Sushi Nozawa is an LA-based chain with two New York City locations (Flatiron and Soho) that serves traditional sushi styled by esteemed chef Kazunori Nozawa. The restaurant’s formula is simple: There are four sets of “Trust Me” menus, each of which starts with edamame and a small cup of tuna sashimi, followed by sushi and hand rolls. Options range from the smallest Trust Me Lite ($23), which includes four pieces of nigiri and a hand roll, to the Don’t Think. Just Trust Me ($63), which comes with two pieces of sashimi, 12 pieces of nigiri, and two hand rolls. Warning: The wait time for walk-ins can be long.

An eight-piece sushi roll sits next to a side of edamame
Sugarfish
Eater Video

Sushi By Bae

Sushi by Bae is a six-seat counter that originally started as a sister pop-up to Sushi by Bou in 2017. The omakase costs $125, and there are three seatings each evening (6:00 p.m., 7:30 p.m, and 9:00 p.m.). Come here for an accessible, casual vibe that seeks to make omakase accessible. Owner Oona Tempest — a U.S.-trained chef who stands out as a woman in a world that’s dominated by Japanese chefs who trained in Japan — is chatty and more than happy to answer highly technical questions about the service.

Omakase Room by Maaser

This 14-seat BYOB spot in the West Village sources its fish from Tokyo’s world-renowned fish vendors in Sakasyu. Selections fly into New York three times a week for the restaurant’s Edomae-style sushi, employing traditional techniques such as aging, konbu-jime (a technique used for briefly curing fish between two slices of kombu seaweed and refrigerating), and occasional charcoal grilling and smoking. Its 17-piece omakase is $125, and the meal lasts 75 minutes.

Kanoyama

This Michelin-starred Little Tokyo spot offers a $125 omakase seating 12 people Tuesday through Saturday every week. Chef Nobuyuki Shikanai serves omakase in a celebratory, upbeat manner; each bite is displayed in Shikanai’s cupped hands for diners to take with their fingers. Past menu highlights have included cherry trout hakozushi and jackfish with grains of Icelandic sea salt and lemon; however, as the menu is highly seasonal, note that selections change on a daily basis.

Hasaki

This casual East Village institution, which seats 10 people at the counter for omakase and another 30 or so in the dining room, has been around since 1984. It offers three sushi omakase options: a $60 “traditional” option with nine pieces of sushi and one roll in its classic style, a $80 “special” option with 12 pieces of seasonal fish sushi and one roll, and a $110 “premium” option incorporating wagyu and truffle with 12 pieces of sushi and one roll. It also offers two sashimi omakases — a $65 deluxe sashimi and a $140 premium sashimi for two — as well as combination options, including a $150 sushi and sashimi for two.

Sushi by M

This is unfussy yet intimate spot offers chef Tim Lin’s playful take on the omakase experience. It focuses on unique flavor profiles and unexpected combinations such as the Big Mac (an $18 extravaganza with chopped toro, seared toro, wagyu, and two types of uni stacked inside a piece of seaweed). Choose from two omakase choices: a $50 option (12 pieces) and a $95 option (19 pieces). A la carte pieces, which range in price from about $8 to $20, can also be added. Menus change on a weekly basis based on fish availability, but can be reliably counted on to offer things like hamachi, tuna, uni and toro. Each omakase seating is capped at 12 seats per session.

View this post on Instagram

Friday night fun night.... let’s go for party!!!!!

A post shared by Sushi by m (@sushi_by_m) on

Sushi Dojo

There are four omakase choices at this East Village serving a modern take on omakase. The smallest starts at $65 for 12 pieces of chef’s choice sushi. Choices then go up to $75 for the Dojo omakase (eight premium sushi and a king salmon hand roll), $95 for 15 pieces of chef’s choice sushi and a hand roll, and $125 for the chef’s choice of sushi and sashimi. Unlike more traditional omakase places, Sushi Dojo incorporates nontraditional elements such as foie gras, gold leaf, and truffle into some of its offerings. The ambiance — which resembles that of a house party more than that of a traditional, somber sushi joint — is more laid back and relaxed than that of many other places with comparable omakases in the city. Note: The $65 and $75 omakase choices aren’t available at the sushi counter.

Ume Williamsburg

The traditional omakase at this minimalist Williamsburg spot features 15 pieces of seasonal sushi for $83, as well as a $65 signature sushi set featuring seasonal fish and vegetables. For the latter meal, rather than offering a traditional omakase experience where a chef assembles all the food for the diner, Ume provides diners boards with the sushi elements — fish, rice and nori — in disassembled form alongside a parade of unique salts such as ghost-pepper or truffle sea salt. Diners then have the flexibility to craft their own combinations of seaweed, fish, rice and seasoning.

View this post on Instagram

Never too much oyster.

A post shared by Ume Williamsburg (@ume.williamsburg) on

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Sushi Yashin

Sushi Yashin is a low-key, 20-seat spot that offers a 12-piece omakase for $85, and some weeks, this is reduced to a 10-piece omakase for $78. There is also a market price open-style omakase, where the price varies depending on the number of courses ordered by the customer; generally people order about 12 pieces for $85. Reservations are required for all omakases because they aren’t available every day, so plan accordingly.

Katsuei

Sushi Katsuei’s under 50-seat original Park Slope location is a neighborhood favorite that opened in 2014 and spearheaded the elevation of sushi in Brooklyn. Prior to Sushi Katsuei’s opening, few — if any — Brooklyn sushi bars could credible claim to rise above neighborhood stalwart status. Sushi Katsuei’s reasonably priced menu offers a $52 omakase with nine pieces of nigiri. Its newer West Village location is a touch pricier at $60 for the omakase experience, but it includes a toro scallion hand roll in addition to the nine pieces of nigiri. Both locations serve Edomae sushi with a modern twist, and much of the fish served at Sushi Katsuei is flown in from the famed Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo.

A piece of red sushi over rice is topped with green paste
Sushi Katsuei’s $60 omakase
Stefanie Tuder/Eater

Related Maps