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NYC’s 31 Top Sushi Restaurants

From luxe omakases to quality-driven neighborhood gems

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New York’s sushi scene has come a long way over the last two decades — so much so that great sashimi and nigiri can be found in most neighborhoods. Today, Manhattan has some of the highest-quality seafood found outside of Japan, and the city’s top counters are as good as many respected places in Tokyo. In the last year, New York has welcomed in top-tier players like Nakaji and Shion 69 Leonard, and slightly more affordable counters like Sushi Ikumi and Omakase Room by Mitsu.

Below, this guide spans the gamut from Masa, one of America’s most expensive restaurants, to the quality-driven neighborhood gem that still might cook chicken teriyaki. With that in mind, here’s a list of NYC’s sushi houses that are a cut above the rest — but first some guidelines for traditional sushi-eating practices:

1. Don’t be late. Omakase meals typically start at the time of one’s reservation, so it’s customary to arrive five to 10 minutes early. Showing up on time is considered late.
2. Sit at the bar whenever possible. It’s just not the same at a table, where a chef can’t directly hand off pieces of fish.
3. Do not mix fresh wasabi in with soy. Chefs take pride in their wasabi; diluting it can be insulting.
4. When sitting at a sushi counter, eat nigiri the second it lands in front of you. If not, the temperature contrast between fish and rice, the moisture from the painted sheet of sauce, and the structural integrity of the whole darn piece could be compromised.
5. Everyone will like uni eventually, so keep trying it. It may be a lot at first, but there is a reason the room goes quiet when the box comes out.
6. Don’t ask, “What’s fresh?” Fish is often intentionally aged at least a few days to reach peak flavor and texture.
7. Don’t talk about all the other omakases you’ve smashed in NYC. It’s obnoxious.
8. Pick up nigiri directly, sans chopsticks, at tasting counters.
9. Each chef will have a slightly different style of cooking rice, and there is no perfect version. Instead of judging it, just consider it on the spectrums of sweetness, acidity, granularity, and temperature.
10. Chefs prefer when diners don’t wear perfume or cologne. It can distract from the meal.
11. When having a blast, offering to buy the chef a round of sake is a nice touch. Or offer a glass of the bottle you’ve brought.

Note: This is an updated map originally published in 2016.

The latest CDC guidance for vaccinated diners during the COVID-19 outbreak is here; dining out still carries risks for unvaccinated diners and workers. Please be aware of changing local rules, and check individual restaurant websites for any additional restrictions such as mask requirements. Find a local vaccination site here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Sushi Yasaka

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251 W 72nd St
New York, NY 10023
(212) 496-8460
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The unassuming Upper West Side restaurant looks like it could be like any other underwhelming neighborhood sushi restaurant, but the chefs here have a reputation for slicing quality fish. Local residents already know this, so expect to wait for a table. Once you sit down though, food will come out quickly. Omakase is an option, but the sushi packages are also a pretty good deal.

2. Sushi Noz

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181 E 78th St
New York, NY 10075
(917) 338-1792
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Sushi Noz has solidified its place as one of New York’s top omakase experiences, one that’s rife with Japanese seafood not found elsewhere in the city. Patrons can pick from two counter experiences: The main Hinoki Counter, helmed by Sushiden alum Nozomu Abe, aka Noz, where the chef serves eight diners a $395 omakase, and the slightly less expensive Ash Room, where Noz’s second in command serves a slightly less expensive omakase priced at $225. Patrons at each counter can expect an Edomae-inspired experience with occasional Western touches — the meal begins with otsumami (appetizers), before moving into around 15 nigiri bites, followed by miso soup, and finally tomago (egg). Those at the Hinoki Counter often conclude with a piece of seasonal Japanese fruit, as is customary in Japan.

A blonde wood-bedecked sushi bar with six seats Noz [Official Photo]

3. Sushi Ishikawa

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419 E 74th St
New York, NY 10021
(212) 651-7292
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Former O Ya chef Don Pham is behind Upper East Side addition Sushi Ishikawa. Inside the 500-square-foot space, patrons embark on a more modern omakase that involves bites made with truffle and gold flakes. The sushi bar hasn’t reopened for indoor dining yet, but the team is still serving the omakase menu on the patio, priced at $95 for 12 courses, or $135 for 15 courses.

4. Masa

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10 Columbus Circle
New York, NY 10019
(212) 823-9800
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A chef that really needs no introduction, Masa Takayama’s esteemed three-star sushi temple — notorious for its no-photo policy — reigns atop the Time Warner Center, commanding what some consider to be America’s best, and priciest, omakase. The $650 (tip included) per head caviar- and truffle-studded counter or table meal is rife with luxury ingredients, in addition to spendy supplements like wagyu.

5. Uogashi

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318 W 51st St
New York, NY 10019
(646) 678-3008
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Lauded for its pristine fish, Uogashi — which relocated from the East Village to Midtown after a devastating fire in 2018 — has earned a devout following for its top-quality omakases priced at $125 or $175. Choose from a long sushi counter or tables, where guests can also order izakaya-style dishes like shrimp tempura and sake-steamed clams. Back when Pete Wells visited in 2019, he gave the restaurant two stars.

6. Sushi Ginza Onodera

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461 5th Ave
New York, NY 10017
(212) 390-0925
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An offshoot of the Ginza, Tokyo-based sushi brand, this eight-seat Midtown staple serves some of the highest quality fish in town, with deliveries coming in three times per week. The team recently welcomed in new chef Takuya Kubo, who joined the restaurant by way of Sushi Ginza Onodera in Honolulu. While most high-end omakase counters in New York only focus on dinner, Onodera also offers lunch. Mid-day menus are priced at $100, $150, and $200, while the only dinner menu runs $400. During dinner, the highly seasonal menu includes around eight small appetizers, eight pieces of bites, a handroll, miso soup, tamago, then dessert and tea.

A lengthy corner sushi counter, with napkins and utensils set for service. In the background, one wall is composed of checkered light and dark woods. Sushi Ginza Onodera [Official]

7. Sushi Amane

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245 E 44th St
New York, NY 10017
(212) 986-5300
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Sushi Amane first made waves when it debuted in 2017 under command of Shion Uino, who formerly worked at one of the world’s top sushi counters, Tokyo’s Sushi Saito. Recently, new head chef Tomoyuki Hayashi — previously of Sushi Azabu, also on this list — has replaced Uino and rolled out a new omakase priced at $200. The menu is Edomae-style, comprised of all wild-caught seafood, much of which is flown in from Japan and received in daily deliveries. Offering just eight seats at the sushi counter, Amane’s omakase begins with a series of small Japanese appetizers before heading into nine or so nigiri bites, tamago, a hand roll, and miso soup.

8. Sushi Yasuda

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204 E 43rd St
New York, NY 10017
(212) 972-1001
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Sushi Yasuda is one of New York’s oldest omakase haunts, regarded as a bastion for fine fish. Here, one can sit at a table or at the bar, and order a la carte, or choose from one of two omakase options: $100 for 12 pieces of sushi, or $160 for 18 pieces of sushi and half of a maki roll. Pro tip: The best seats in the house are at the far end of the sushi bar.

A handful of guests sit at a sushi counter, while multiple people in a white chef’s outfit and hat work behind the counter Sushi Yasuda [Official Photo]

9. Noda

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6 W 28th St
New York, NY 10001

For an all-out NYC sushi experience, Noda is the place. Chef Shigeyuki Tsunoda relocated from Japan to New York to open the restaurant, and he’s serving some of the city’s highest-quality sushi at an eight-seat counter hidden behind a lush purple curtain that separates it from the adjacent diners-only Japanese whiskey bar. Once through the curtain, diners embark on a $315 Edomae-style omakase, which begins with small appetizers and transitions into 11 or so pieces of nigiri.

10. Momoya

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185 7th Ave
New York, NY 10011
(212) 989-4466
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Those who reside in Chelsea frequently point to Momoya as the neighborhood’s best casual sushi option. This one-size-fits-all Japanese restaurant has a bar with a chef’s choice menu for more serious sushi enthusiasts, plus tables fit for orders of lobster tacos and crunchy salmon rolls. A slew of Americanized hot and cold Japanese plates like gyoza and chicken teriyaki round out the menu.

11. Sugarfish

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33 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003
(347) 705-8100
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This lauded Los Angeles omakase export is beloved for its umami-rich fish offered at rock-bottom prices. Lunch set meals range from $23 for six courses to $63 for around 10 courses, with meals priced only a hair higher during dinner. Diners can also add dishes like Hokkaido scallop nigiri and lobster hand rolls. Since its New York City debut in 2016, Sugarfish has expanded with two additional locations (and a third launching imminently in Midtown). The team also operates the city’s popular handroll bar, KazuNori. Come here for a casual meal built of high-quality fish. 

Three pairs of two pieces of sushi, topped with raw cuts of colorful fish, sit on a rectangular plate Sugarfish [Official]

12. Kosaka

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220 W 13th St
New York, NY 10011
(212) 727-1709
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Kosaka, helmed by chef Yoshihiko Kousaka, serves one of the city’s best omakases under $200. The small space offers a cozy 12-seat bar where the single menu runs $195, or $175 for those at one of the four tables. The meal begins with a small starter, followed by a mixed plate of sashimi, 11 nigiri bites, a hand roll, then soup and dessert. Diners can also bump up their menu with an uni tasting, or choose from other supplements like foie gras and king crab.

13. Ennju

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20 E 17th St
New York, NY 10003

This no-frills Union Square neighborhood staple functions as a minimalist Japanese market and cafe vending sushi, udon, and assorted donburi to stay or go. Sashimi, nigiri, and affordably-priced classic and more exotic rolls incorporate good-quality fish, and less expensive combo assortments are also available. Regulars line up at 9 p.m. daily, and often before, to pillage the remaining sushi selection, when all pre-made rolls are half off.

14. Omakase Room by Mitsu

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14 Christopher St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 367-2067
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Previously known as Omakase Room by Tatsu, this cozy, basement-level, eight-seat counter recently brought on new head chef Mitsonori Isoda — the former executive chef of Jewel Bako — who is heading up the 14-course, $160 omakase. All of the seafood here is flown in overnight from Japan (except for the tuna, which comes from Canada), with deliveries arriving four times each week. While the menu is highly seasonal, some of Isoda’s best-known bites are his maguro zuke nigiri, an akami tuna marinated overnight in dashi, and his 40-day aged toro.

A person in a white chef’s outfit stands behind the counter at an a sushi restaurant, with tables pulled up to the counter for service Omakase Room by Mitsu [Official]

15. Shuko

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47 E 12th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 228-6088
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Upscale service with a downtown vibe is the theme at Shuko, the narrow, Union Square sushi joint from Masa and Neta vets Jimmy Lau and Nick Kim. Dedicated to serving top-level sushi, and with a devout following from none other than Jay-Z and Beyoncé, the place is still going strong after almost seven years. Here, customers will find bites garnished with luxury ingredients like caviar and gold leaf to truffle, and the single omakase runs $228, with the option to add a beverage pairing for $100. Last time Eater critic Ryan Sutton visited, he called it one of the city’s most exciting places to eat sushi, while the Times’ Pete Wells found it to be intense, lively, and imbued with “sophisticated cool.”  

16. Sushi Nakazawa

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23 Commerce St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 924-2212
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Restaurateur Alessandro Borgognone took a huge departure from his past projects by opening Nakazawa in 2013 — but his first sushi establishment immediately became one of the city’s buzziest restaurants because of its chef, Jiro Dreams of Sushi apprentice Daisuke Nakazawa. 

Since its debut, Nakazawa has earned one Michelin star, a perfect four stars from the Times, and three from Eater’s Ryan Sutton. While most omakase sushi spots only offer dinner service, Nakazawa serves lunch as well, and diners can choose from bar seats or tables. There’s the original 10-seat bar and a newer six-seat bar in the lounge, plus dining room tables. The omakase menus at both bars run $150, while the dining room menu costs $120.

A series of people in white chef’s outfits and hats work behind a counter, slicing sushi and preparing dishes for customers Nick Solares/Eater

17. Kanoyama

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175 2nd Ave
New York, NY 10003
(212) 777-5266
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Even before chef Nobuyuki Shikanai nabbed one Michelin star, his unfussy sushi spot had already earned a devout neighborhood following for its well-priced fresh fish. A long menu of sashimi, nigiri, and rolls — in addition to izakaya bites like shrimp tempura and gyoza — run a

 la carte, but the most coveted seats are at Shikana’s omakase counter. Note, while Kanoyama is open daily and accepts walk-ins, this $145 chef’s choice menu is only served Thursday through Saturday and requires reservations.

18. Sushi Zo

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88 W 3rd St
New York, NY 10012
(424) 201-5576
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This upscale omakase spot was ranked as one of the best sushi options in Los Angeles for years before owner Keizo Seki planted its flag steps from Washington Square Park in 2015. Expect a somewhat traditional omakase known as “Zo-style,” which occasionally includes nigiri bites with heaps of uni crowned with caviar. Zo is also known for serving rare cuts of fish during a meal. As such, expect to pay for it. An omakase meal, the only option at Zo, starts around $200. There’s also a newer Midtown location that opened up in 2017.

19. Cagen

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414 E 9th St
New York, NY 10009
(212) 358-8800
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While some frequent Cagen for its excellent soba noodles, the nigiri here shines just as bright. Chef and owner Toshio Tomita offers two omakases: The pricier menu runs $200 for 17 nigiri bites and a hand roll, and this menu is served in the restaurant’s backroom. Up front, chef offers a $110 omakase that includes 12 pieces of nigiri and a hand roll. All of the fish is seasonal and flown in from Japan, and after each meal diners can add additional bites like Hokkaido-style uni and wagyu from Miyazaki.

20. Tomoe Sushi

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172 Thompson St
New York, NY 10012
(212) 777-9346
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Tomoe has been around for years, and it could be mistaken for just another average neighborhood sushi restaurant, were it not for its long lines. The Greenwich Village standout serves some of the top rolls in the city at some of the most affordable prices, plus everything flies out of the kitchen, making this a fantastic weeknight spot. Make sure to get a seaweed salad.

21. Rosella

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137 Avenue A
New York, NY 10009
(646) 422-7729
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Sustainably-minded sushi spot Rosella, which offers a la carte ordering and a single omakase priced at $150, is one of the newer additions to this list, having debuted in October 2020. Jeff Miller and Yoni Lang formerly of Austin’s Uchiko helm the kitchen, and the duo take a more liberal, creative approach to maki rolls and nigiri. Come here for what might be the city’s best avocado roll — this one is made with zippy kimchi — in addition to fluke nigiri with chives and walnut wood-smoked yellowtail. As for drinks, expect a heavy attention to natural wine.

Two men wearing black face masks stand behind a kitchen and are bending over preparing food
Left to right: Chefs Yoni Lang and Jeff Miller
Adam Friedlander/Eater

22. Kura

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130 Saint Marks Pl
New York, NY 10009
(212) 228-1010

Norihiro Ishizuka, the charming chef at this quiet restaurant, cuts the fish in larger pieces than is commonly found in traditional sushi. Times critic Ligaya Mishan called him the Tony Bennett of sushi chefs, “a crooner working the crowd with a genial smile and a generous hand.” An omakase costs about $120, making it one of the better deals in the city.

23. Sushi Ikumi

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135 Sullivan St
New York, NY 10012
(917) 409-1588
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Last year, the team behind Soho kaiseki spot Hirohisa introduced this diminutive sushi bar just a few steps away. Counting just 10 counter seats, this might be the most affordably priced, highest quality omakase meal in the city right now. Chef Jongin Jeong is charging $160 for his excellent omakase, which skews Kyoto-style, meaning there’s a heavy attention to preserved and cured fish, and some bites are pressed into a box oshizushi-style. The meal begins with tsumami, before moving into roughly 14 nigiri bites, a plated dish, a rice option, and seasonal Japanese fruit.

A light wood sushi counter with napkins and chopsticks set for service Sushi Ikumi [Official]

24. Sushi on Jones

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348 Bowery
New York, NY 10012
(917) 270-1815
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This is New York’s first outdoor omakase: a 14-seat sushi bar with additional tables at Bowery Market. The meal, which lasts no more than 45 minutes, includes 12 pieces for $58 or 20 pieces for $105. Sushi on Jones serves as an excellent option for high-quality sushi at a fair price, with bites like fatty tuna, scallop, sea urchin, and wagyu. Since its debut five years ago, Sushi on Jones has expanded with locations in the West Village, Gotham Market (delivery-only), and London.

25. Kissaki Sushi

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319 Bowery
New York, NY 10003
(212) 577-1150
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Affordable sushi counter Kissaki has taken the city — and the Hamptons — by storm, debuting six locations in the last year alone, with more in the works. A concept by former Gaijin executive chef Mark Garcia, Kissaki offers less traditional nigiri made with popular luxury ingredients including caviar and truffles, and places emphasis on unctuous bites like toro and uni. While the omakase menus change a bit between locations, one can roughly expect to spend anywhere from $95 for 10 courses to $150 for 16 courses before a la carte ordering.

Inside a restaurant with white and red striped walls, tall green chairs propped up against a wooden counter and on the opposite side some more green chairs against red tables Kissaki [Official]

26. Sushi Azabu

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428 Greenwich St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 274-0428
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This basement-level sushi speakeasy has long been one of Tribeca’s worst-kept secrets, slicing fish since 2004. Masa vet Xiao Lin has helmed the bar for the last three years, focusing on a $180 Edomae omakase experience, with fish coming in three times per week from Japan. The restaurant’s eight bar seats are open Thursday to Saturday, otherwise Azabu offers tables for omakase and a la carte ordering. Those who opt for the chef’s choice menu can expect a series of appetizers before moving into a toro tasting, an uni tasting, a hot seasonal dish, nine nigiri bites, miso soup, and dessert.

27. Uchu

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217 Eldridge St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 203-7634
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As the story goes, renowned sushi chef Eiji Ichimura of Brushstroke decamped to Tribeca to spawn his own namesake project. Six months in, he split from the place, finally landing at the now two-Michelin-starred Lower East Side newbie, Uchu. Since fall 2017, Ichimura has presided over a 10-seat omakase stage to display uni-stuffed monaka and swatches of fish aged for longer than most. This experience runs a cool $330.

A man in blue clothing stands behind a sushi counter, presenting a piece of sushi to a customer at a placemat set for service
Chef Eiji Ichimura
Uchu [Official]

28. Shion 69 Leonard

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69 Leonard St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 404-4600
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When a chef can elevate white fish to the buttery richness of toro, you know you’re in the right place. And that’s precisely the talent of Shion Uino, who made waves when he landed in New York by way of Tokyo in 2017, having come off a decade’s worth of work at one of the world’s most prestigious sushi bars, the three-Michelin-starred Sushi Saito. The chef has most recently teamed up with 69 Leonard owner Idan Elkon to launch this new high-end sushi concept priced at $420 (including tip) that centers on rare seafood and, hands down, the city’s most excellent interpretation of tamago. Wed to true Edomae style, the menu progresses from sashimi to a series of tsumami (small appetizers), nine nigiri bites, a hand roll, soup and that tamago, which takes on custardy texture. Ueno receives seafood deliveries five times per week, and one of his childhood friends handpicks most of his fish from his hometown of Amakusa in Kumamoto.

A perfectly rectangular cube of what appears to be gelatin rests on a white counter against a blurred light brown background Shion at 69 Leonard [Official]

29. Nakaji

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48 Bowery
New York, NY 10013
(646) 478-8282
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Like many of Tokyo’s top sushi bars, Nakaji is tucked away in an unassuming hallway partially decorated with charred cedar wood. Look for an illuminated box bearing the chef’s name in calligraphy, and press the doorbell to enter what might be the city’s most exciting sushi concept right now. Helmed by longtime sushi vet Kunihide Nakajima, and launched right before the pandemic, this wholly Japanese experience — which takes place at a 10-seat sushi counter and involves Japanese seafood like ice fish and sea cucumber — has quickly ensconced itself as one of the city’s most traditional Japanese experiences, from its minimalist aesthetic to its standout menu. Compared to the sushi Nakajima served during his previous tenure at Sushiden, Nakaji is a step up in price and quality, currently running $225 for a menu that includes tsumami, a hot plated dish, 12 nigiri bites, soup, and seasonal Japanese fruit.

A man in a white chef’s outfit and hat stands at a sushi counter, setting a table for service
Chef Kunihide Nakajim
Nakaji [Official]

30. Okozushi

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376 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(347) 599-1144
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The cozy, minimalist-designed Okozushi, which counts fewer than 10 seats and doesn’t accept reservations, serves set sushi menus, in addition to hand rolls, chirashi bowls, and some hot dishes. The sushi style here takes inspiration from Kyoto, where sushi is typically cured and pressed. Score set menus of nigiri, sashimi, and rolls priced between $23 and $28.

31. Katsuei

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210 7th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11215
(718) 788-5338
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As far as Brooklyn sushi goes, Katsuei is the top option. It’s beloved by locals, and a review in the Times established its destination status. In fact, after its Brooklyn debut in 2014, the team launched a West Village outlet three years later. Both locations serve some of the highest quality, most affordable sushi in New York. At the moment, the Brooklyn location’s sushi bar is closed (but the $57-$120 omakases are offered at tables), but the West Village counter is up and running, offering just one menu priced at $130 for 15 courses.

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1. Sushi Yasaka

251 W 72nd St, New York, NY 10023

The unassuming Upper West Side restaurant looks like it could be like any other underwhelming neighborhood sushi restaurant, but the chefs here have a reputation for slicing quality fish. Local residents already know this, so expect to wait for a table. Once you sit down though, food will come out quickly. Omakase is an option, but the sushi packages are also a pretty good deal.

251 W 72nd St
New York, NY 10023

2. Sushi Noz

181 E 78th St, New York, NY 10075
Read Review |
A blonde wood-bedecked sushi bar with six seats Noz [Official Photo]

Sushi Noz has solidified its place as one of New York’s top omakase experiences, one that’s rife with Japanese seafood not found elsewhere in the city. Patrons can pick from two counter experiences: The main Hinoki Counter, helmed by Sushiden alum Nozomu Abe, aka Noz, where the chef serves eight diners a $395 omakase, and the slightly less expensive Ash Room, where Noz’s second in command serves a slightly less expensive omakase priced at $225. Patrons at each counter can expect an Edomae-inspired experience with occasional Western touches — the meal begins with otsumami (appetizers), before moving into around 15 nigiri bites, followed by miso soup, and finally tomago (egg). Those at the Hinoki Counter often conclude with a piece of seasonal Japanese fruit, as is customary in Japan.

181 E 78th St
New York, NY 10075

3. Sushi Ishikawa

419 E 74th St, New York, NY 10021

Former O Ya chef Don Pham is behind Upper East Side addition Sushi Ishikawa. Inside the 500-square-foot space, patrons embark on a more modern omakase that involves bites made with truffle and gold flakes. The sushi bar hasn’t reopened for indoor dining yet, but the team is still serving the omakase menu on the patio, priced at $95 for 12 courses, or $135 for 15 courses.

419 E 74th St
New York, NY 10021

4. Masa

10 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

A chef that really needs no introduction, Masa Takayama’s esteemed three-star sushi temple — notorious for its no-photo policy — reigns atop the Time Warner Center, commanding what some consider to be America’s best, and priciest, omakase. The $650 (tip included) per head caviar- and truffle-studded counter or table meal is rife with luxury ingredients, in addition to spendy supplements like wagyu.

10 Columbus Circle
New York, NY 10019

5. Uogashi

318 W 51st St, New York, NY 10019

Lauded for its pristine fish, Uogashi — which relocated from the East Village to Midtown after a devastating fire in 2018 — has earned a devout following for its top-quality omakases priced at $125 or $175. Choose from a long sushi counter or tables, where guests can also order izakaya-style dishes like shrimp tempura and sake-steamed clams. Back when Pete Wells visited in 2019, he gave the restaurant two stars.

318 W 51st St
New York, NY 10019

6. Sushi Ginza Onodera

461 5th Ave, New York, NY 10017
A lengthy corner sushi counter, with napkins and utensils set for service. In the background, one wall is composed of checkered light and dark woods. Sushi Ginza Onodera [Official]

An offshoot of the Ginza, Tokyo-based sushi brand, this eight-seat Midtown staple serves some of the highest quality fish in town, with deliveries coming in three times per week. The team recently welcomed in new chef Takuya Kubo, who joined the restaurant by way of Sushi Ginza Onodera in Honolulu. While most high-end omakase counters in New York only focus on dinner, Onodera also offers lunch. Mid-day menus are priced at $100, $150, and $200, while the only dinner menu runs $400. During dinner, the highly seasonal menu includes around eight small appetizers, eight pieces of bites, a handroll, miso soup, tamago, then dessert and tea.

461 5th Ave
New York, NY 10017

7. Sushi Amane

245 E 44th St, New York, NY 10017

Sushi Amane first made waves when it debuted in 2017 under command of Shion Uino, who formerly worked at one of the world’s top sushi counters, Tokyo’s Sushi Saito. Recently, new head chef Tomoyuki Hayashi — previously of Sushi Azabu, also on this list — has replaced Uino and rolled out a new omakase priced at $200. The menu is Edomae-style, comprised of all wild-caught seafood, much of which is flown in from Japan and received in daily deliveries. Offering just eight seats at the sushi counter, Amane’s omakase begins with a series of small Japanese appetizers before heading into nine or so nigiri bites, tamago, a hand roll, and miso soup.

245 E 44th St
New York, NY 10017

8. Sushi Yasuda

204 E 43rd St, New York, NY 10017
A handful of guests sit at a sushi counter, while multiple people in a white chef’s outfit and hat work behind the counter Sushi Yasuda [Official Photo]

Sushi Yasuda is one of New York’s oldest omakase haunts, regarded as a bastion for fine fish. Here, one can sit at a table or at the bar, and order a la carte, or choose from one of two omakase options: $100 for 12 pieces of sushi, or $160 for 18 pieces of sushi and half of a maki roll. Pro tip: The best seats in the house are at the far end of the sushi bar.

204 E 43rd St
New York, NY 10017

9. Noda

6 W 28th St, New York, NY 10001
Read Review |

For an all-out NYC sushi experience, Noda is the place. Chef Shigeyuki Tsunoda relocated from Japan to New York to open the restaurant, and he’s serving some of the city’s highest-quality sushi at an eight-seat counter hidden behind a lush purple curtain that separates it from the adjacent diners-only Japanese whiskey bar. Once through the curtain, diners embark on a $315 Edomae-style omakase, which begins with small appetizers and transitions into 11 or so pieces of nigiri.

6 W 28th St
New York, NY 10001

10. Momoya

185 7th Ave, New York, NY 10011

Those who reside in Chelsea frequently point to Momoya as the neighborhood’s best casual sushi option. This one-size-fits-all Japanese restaurant has a bar with a chef’s choice menu for more serious sushi enthusiasts, plus tables fit for orders of lobster tacos and crunchy salmon rolls. A slew of Americanized hot and cold Japanese plates like gyoza and chicken teriyaki round out the menu.

185 7th Ave
New York, NY 10011

11. Sugarfish

33 E 20th St, New York, NY 10003
Three pairs of two pieces of sushi, topped with raw cuts of colorful fish, sit on a rectangular plate Sugarfish [Official]

This lauded Los Angeles omakase export is beloved for its umami-rich fish offered at rock-bottom prices. Lunch set meals range from $23 for six courses to $63 for around 10 courses, with meals priced only a hair higher during dinner. Diners can also add dishes like Hokkaido scallop nigiri and lobster hand rolls. Since its New York City debut in 2016, Sugarfish has expanded with two additional locations (and a third launching imminently in Midtown). The team also operates the city’s popular handroll bar, KazuNori. Come here for a casual meal built of high-quality fish. 

33 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003

12. Kosaka

220 W 13th St, New York, NY 10011

Kosaka, helmed by chef Yoshihiko Kousaka, serves one of the city’s best omakases under $200. The small space offers a cozy 12-seat bar where the single menu runs $195, or $175 for those at one of the four tables. The meal begins with a small starter, followed by a mixed plate of sashimi, 11 nigiri bites, a hand roll, then soup and dessert. Diners can also bump up their menu with an uni tasting, or choose from other supplements like foie gras and king crab.

220 W 13th St
New York, NY 10011

13. Ennju

20 E 17th St, New York, NY 10003

This no-frills Union Square neighborhood staple functions as a minimalist Japanese market and cafe vending sushi, udon, and assorted donburi to stay or go. Sashimi, nigiri, and affordably-priced classic and more exotic rolls incorporate good-quality fish, and less expensive combo assortments are also available. Regulars line up at 9 p.m. daily, and often before, to pillage the remaining sushi selection, when all pre-made rolls are half off.

20 E 17th St
New York, NY 10003

14. Omakase Room by Mitsu

14 Christopher St, New York, NY 10014
A person in a white chef’s outfit stands behind the counter at an a sushi restaurant, with tables pulled up to the counter for service Omakase Room by Mitsu [Official]

Previously known as Omakase Room by Tatsu, this cozy, basement-level, eight-seat counter recently brought on new head chef Mitsonori Isoda — the former executive chef of Jewel Bako — who is heading up the 14-course, $160 omakase. All of the seafood here is flown in overnight from Japan (except for the tuna, which comes from Canada), with deliveries arriving four times each week. While the menu is highly seasonal, some of Isoda’s best-known bites are his maguro zuke nigiri, an akami tuna marinated overnight in dashi, and his 40-day aged toro.

14 Christopher St
New York, NY 10014

15. Shuko

47 E 12th St, New York, NY 10003

Upscale service with a downtown vibe is the theme at Shuko, the narrow, Union Square sushi joint from Masa and Neta vets Jimmy Lau and Nick Kim. Dedicated to serving top-level sushi, and with a devout following from none other than Jay-Z and Beyoncé, the place is still going strong after almost seven years. Here, customers will find bites garnished with luxury ingredients like caviar and gold leaf to truffle, and the single omakase runs $228, with the option to add a beverage pairing for $100. Last time Eater critic Ryan Sutton visited, he called it one of the city’s most exciting places to eat sushi, while the Times’ Pete Wells found it to be intense, lively, and imbued with “sophisticated cool.”  

47 E 12th St
New York, NY 10003

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16. Sushi Nakazawa

23 Commerce St, New York, NY 10014
Read Review |
A series of people in white chef’s outfits and hats work behind a counter, slicing sushi and preparing dishes for customers Nick Solares/Eater

Restaurateur Alessandro Borgognone took a huge departure from his past projects by opening Nakazawa in 2013 — but his first sushi establishment immediately became one of the city’s buzziest restaurants because of its chef, Jiro Dreams of Sushi apprentice Daisuke Nakazawa. 

Since its debut, Nakazawa has earned one Michelin star, a perfect four stars from the Times, and three from Eater’s Ryan Sutton. While most omakase sushi spots only offer dinner service, Nakazawa serves lunch as well, and diners can choose from bar seats or tables. There’s the original 10-seat bar and a newer six-seat bar in the lounge, plus dining room tables. The omakase menus at both bars run $150, while the dining room menu costs $120.

23 Commerce St
New York, NY 10014

17. Kanoyama

175 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003

Even before chef Nobuyuki Shikanai nabbed one Michelin star, his unfussy sushi spot had already earned a devout neighborhood following for its well-priced fresh fish. A long menu of sashimi, nigiri, and rolls — in addition to izakaya bites like shrimp tempura and gyoza — run a

 la carte, but the most coveted seats are at Shikana’s omakase counter. Note, while Kanoyama is open daily and accepts walk-ins, this $145 chef’s choice menu is only served Thursday through Saturday and requires reservations.

175 2nd Ave
New York, NY 10003

18. Sushi Zo

88 W 3rd St, New York, NY 10012

This upscale omakase spot was ranked as one of the best sushi options in Los Angeles for years before owner Keizo Seki planted its flag steps from Washington Square Park in 2015. Expect a somewhat traditional omakase known as “Zo-style,” which occasionally includes nigiri bites with heaps of uni crowned with caviar. Zo is also known for serving rare cuts of fish during a meal. As such, expect to pay for it. An omakase meal, the only option at Zo, starts around $200. There’s also a newer Midtown location that opened up in 2017.

88 W 3rd St
New York, NY 10012

19. Cagen

414 E 9th St, New York, NY 10009

While some frequent Cagen for its excellent soba noodles, the nigiri here shines just as bright. Chef and owner Toshio Tomita offers two omakases: The pricier menu runs $200 for 17 nigiri bites and a hand roll, and this menu is served in the restaurant’s backroom. Up front, chef offers a $110 omakase that includes 12 pieces of nigiri and a hand roll. All of the fish is seasonal and flown in from Japan, and after each meal diners can add additional bites like Hokkaido-style uni and wagyu from Miyazaki.

414 E 9th St
New York, NY 10009

20. Tomoe Sushi

172 Thompson St, New York, NY 10012

Tomoe has been around for years, and it could be mistaken for just another average neighborhood sushi restaurant, were it not for its long lines. The Greenwich Village standout serves some of the top rolls in the city at some of the most affordable prices, plus everything flies out of the kitchen, making this a fantastic weeknight spot. Make sure to get a seaweed salad.

172 Thompson St
New York, NY 10012

21. Rosella

137 Avenue A, New York, NY 10009
Two men wearing black face masks stand behind a kitchen and are bending over preparing food
Left to right: Chefs Yoni Lang and Jeff Miller
Adam Friedlander/Eater

Sustainably-minded sushi spot Rosella, which offers a la carte ordering and a single omakase priced at $150, is one of the newer additions to this list, having debuted in October 2020. Jeff Miller and Yoni Lang formerly of Austin’s Uchiko helm the kitchen, and the duo take a more liberal, creative approach to maki rolls and nigiri. Come here for what might be the city’s best avocado roll — this one is made with zippy kimchi — in addition to fluke nigiri with chives and walnut wood-smoked yellowtail. As for drinks, expect a heavy attention to natural wine.

137 Avenue A
New York, NY 10009

22. Kura

130 Saint Marks Pl, New York, NY 10009

Norihiro Ishizuka, the charming chef at this quiet restaurant, cuts the fish in larger pieces than is commonly found in traditional sushi. Times critic Ligaya Mishan called him the Tony Bennett of sushi chefs, “a crooner working the crowd with a genial smile and a generous hand.” An omakase costs about $120, making it one of the better deals in the city.

130 Saint Marks Pl
New York, NY 10009

23. Sushi Ikumi

135 Sullivan St, New York, NY 10012
A light wood sushi counter with napkins and chopsticks set for service Sushi Ikumi [Official]

Last year, the team behind Soho kaiseki spot Hirohisa introduced this diminutive sushi bar just a few steps away. Counting just 10 counter seats, this might be the most affordably priced, highest quality omakase meal in the city right now. Chef Jongin Jeong is charging $160 for his excellent omakase, which skews Kyoto-style, meaning there’s a heavy attention to preserved and cured fish, and some bites are pressed into a box oshizushi-style. The meal begins with tsumami, before moving into roughly 14 nigiri bites, a plated dish, a rice option, and seasonal Japanese fruit.

135 Sullivan St
New York, NY 10012

24. Sushi on Jones

348 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

This is New York’s first outdoor omakase: a 14-seat sushi bar with additional tables at Bowery Market. The meal, which lasts no more than 45 minutes, includes 12 pieces for $58 or 20 pieces for $105. Sushi on Jones serves as an excellent option for high-quality sushi at a fair price, with bites like fatty tuna, scallop, sea urchin, and wagyu. Since its debut five years ago, Sushi on Jones has expanded with locations in the West Village, Gotham Market (delivery-only), and London.

348 Bowery
New York, NY 10012

25. Kissaki Sushi

319 Bowery, New York, NY 10003
Inside a restaurant with white and red striped walls, tall green chairs propped up against a wooden counter and on the opposite side some more green chairs against red tables Kissaki [Official]

Affordable sushi counter Kissaki has taken the city — and the Hamptons — by storm, debuting six locations in the last year alone, with more in the works. A concept by former Gaijin executive chef Mark Garcia, Kissaki offers less traditional nigiri made with popular luxury ingredients including caviar and truffles, and places emphasis on unctuous bites like toro and uni. While the omakase menus change a bit between locations, one can roughly expect to spend anywhere from $95 for 10 courses to $150 for 16 courses before a la carte ordering.

319 Bowery
New York, NY 10003

26. Sushi Azabu

428 Greenwich St, New York, NY 10013

This basement-level sushi speakeasy has long been one of Tribeca’s worst-kept secrets, slicing fish since 2004. Masa vet Xiao Lin has helmed the bar for the last three years, focusing on a $180 Edomae omakase experience, with fish coming in three times per week from Japan. The restaurant’s eight bar seats are open Thursday to Saturday, otherwise Azabu offers tables for omakase and a la carte ordering. Those who opt for the chef’s choice menu can expect a series of appetizers before moving into a toro tasting, an uni tasting, a hot seasonal dish, nine nigiri bites, miso soup, and dessert.

428 Greenwich St
New York, NY 10013

27. Uchu

217 Eldridge St, New York, NY 10002
Read Review |
A man in blue clothing stands behind a sushi counter, presenting a piece of sushi to a customer at a placemat set for service
Chef Eiji Ichimura
Uchu [Official]

As the story goes, renowned sushi chef Eiji Ichimura of Brushstroke decamped to Tribeca to spawn his own namesake project. Six months in, he split from the place, finally landing at the now two-Michelin-starred Lower East Side newbie, Uchu. Since fall 2017, Ichimura has presided over a 10-seat omakase stage to display uni-stuffed monaka and swatches of fish aged for longer than most. This experience runs a cool $330.

217 Eldridge St
New York, NY 10002

28. Shion 69 Leonard

69 Leonard St, New York, NY 10013
A perfectly rectangular cube of what appears to be gelatin rests on a white counter against a blurred light brown background Shion at 69 Leonard [Official]

When a chef can elevate white fish to the buttery richness of toro, you know you’re in the right place. And that’s precisely the talent of Shion Uino, who made waves when he landed in New York by way of Tokyo in 2017, having come off a decade’s worth of work at one of the world’s most prestigious sushi bars, the three-Michelin-starred Sushi Saito. The chef has most recently teamed up with 69 Leonard owner Idan Elkon to launch this new high-end sushi concept priced at $420 (including tip) that centers on rare seafood and, hands down, the city’s most excellent interpretation of tamago. Wed to true Edomae style, the menu progresses from sashimi to a series of tsumami (small appetizers), nine nigiri bites, a hand roll, soup and that tamago, which takes on custardy texture. Ueno receives seafood deliveries five times per week, and one of his childhood friends handpicks most of his fish from his hometown of Amakusa in Kumamoto.

69 Leonard St
New York, NY 10013

29. Nakaji

48 Bowery, New York, NY 10013
A man in a white chef’s outfit and hat stands at a sushi counter, setting a table for service
Chef Kunihide Nakajim
Nakaji [Official]

Like many of Tokyo’s top sushi bars, Nakaji is tucked away in an unassuming hallway partially decorated with charred cedar wood. Look for an illuminated box bearing the chef’s name in calligraphy, and press the doorbell to enter what might be the city’s most exciting sushi concept right now. Helmed by longtime sushi vet Kunihide Nakajima, and launched right before the pandemic, this wholly Japanese experience — which takes place at a 10-seat sushi counter and involves Japanese seafood like ice fish and sea cucumber — has quickly ensconced itself as one of the city’s most traditional Japanese experiences, from its minimalist aesthetic to its standout menu. Compared to the sushi Nakajima served during his previous tenure at Sushiden, Nakaji is a step up in price and quality, currently running $225 for a menu that includes tsumami, a hot plated dish, 12 nigiri bites, soup, and seasonal Japanese fruit.

48 Bowery
New York, NY 10013

30. Okozushi

376 Graham Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211

The cozy, minimalist-designed Okozushi, which counts fewer than 10 seats and doesn’t accept reservations, serves set sushi menus, in addition to hand rolls, chirashi bowls, and some hot dishes. The sushi style here takes inspiration from Kyoto, where sushi is typically cured and pressed. Score set menus of nigiri, sashimi, and rolls priced between $23 and $28.

376 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211

31. Katsuei

210 7th Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11215

As far as Brooklyn sushi goes, Katsuei is the top option. It’s beloved by locals, and a review in the Times established its destination status. In fact, after its Brooklyn debut in 2014, the team launched a West Village outlet three years later. Both locations serve some of the highest quality, most affordable sushi in New York. At the moment, the Brooklyn location’s sushi bar is closed (but the $57-$120 omakases are offered at tables), but the West Village counter is up and running, offering just one menu priced at $130 for 15 courses.

210 7th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11215

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