clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Steak frites on a white plate with a fork and knife next to it
Balthazar’s steak frites
Nick Solares/Eater

Eater Staffers’ 7 Favorite Steaks in NYC

A highly subjective guide to some excellent meat in New York City

View as Map
Balthazar’s steak frites
| Nick Solares/Eater

In what will shock no one, New Yorkers have a lot of opinions about steak. What to some is the platonic ideal — a porterhouse at Peter Luger — is to others entirely overrated. There is no shortage of steakhouses in NYC, both classic and modern, nor other restaurants to score a perfectly cooked piece of meat. But some rise above the rest, and this list is a guide to which stand out to Eater staffers. It’s highly personal and completely subjective, but guaranteed delicious.

Read More
If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Smith & Wollensky

Copy Link

My favorite places for everyday steak aren’t typically steakhouses — Korean barbecue spots like Cote or Jongro come to find as preferable for smaller portions — but for a perfect steakhouse steak, something big enough to require a martini to aid digestion, Smith & Wollensky’s prime rib is my true love. The interior of this mammoth cut is crimson, clean, and bloody, with a stiffly jiggly texture. It is meat that almost wobbles. The exterior cap, as beefy as Texas brisket, is dry-aged to such a degree that recalls a good gorgonzola. If any of this isn’t enough flavor, a giant pool of jus surrounds the whole thing, imparting an impressively round salinity. In fact two martinis might be the right call here. — Ryan Sutton, Eater NY chief critic

Medium rare prime rib on a white plate with creamed spinach in the background. Nick Solares/Eater

Cherry Point

Copy Link

When it comes to what I value in food, flavor, and texture are locked into first place and a good steak is nothing without a perfect ratio of crusted, salty exterior and a buttery interior of medium rare exactness. A steak thinner than prime rib achieves exactly that. Cherry Point’s steak — the cut can vary between hanger and ribeye — is my favorite in the city, thinly sliced with its pommes Anna and roasted shallots. It doesn’t feel like work to eat it, and I get the perfectly contrasted texture I seek in each bite. — Pelin Keskin, Eater video associate producer

Three pieces of medium rare steak on a plate with potatoes and shallots Cherry Point/Yelp [Official Photo]

Balthazar

Copy Link

To me, a steak dinner has a few mandatory components: a power vibe, unabashed nostalgia, and expertly prepared meat. Without those, I’m simply having steak for dinner — which is totally fine but also not the point. And so, the Balthazar steak frites is my New York ideal. That this particular dish arrives to a table in the always crowded, iconic Balthazar dining room ticks the first two boxes right off the bat. The steak, topped with an oversized pat of compound butter and decorated in crosshatch grill-marks, is the result of years of practice, and those fries are legend. — Hillary Dixler Canavan, Eater restaurant editor

The Palm Tribeca

Copy Link

Part of the Palm’s allure for me is deeply steeped in growing up with the brand, but nostalgia or not, I still staunchly stand by the chain’s porterhouse. It’s aged for a minimum of 35 days and always comes out perfectly medium rare, with tender, ruby-red insides and a crackly, charred crust. There’s no butter here; this steak doesn’t need it — it’s just straight-up bloody meat with a salty crust for true meat lovers. I should probably disclose that if you eat at the Tribeca location, you’ll see my caricature smiling down on you from the wall. — Stefanie Tuder, Eater NY senior editor

Steaks under a broiler Nick Solares/Eater

St. Anselm

Copy Link

St. Anselm is my go-to destination for steak for myriad reasons. First and foremost, the $28 butcher’s steak is probably the best deal in town as far as quality steaks go. Second, you get to sit at the bar in front of the grill and watch the chefs in their steak and veggie symphony. Third, everything else — the sides, the fish, the salads, the wine, the desserts — are truly excellent, so you’re not suffering through some sad creamed spinach in order to eat a great main dish. Also: The vibe is great, the women who run it seem like cool, decent people, and it’s in Williamsburg, so when I’m done, I am not battling tourists in Midtown or FiDi. — Amanda Kludt, Eater editor-in-chief

Slices of steak on a white plate with a floral design Michael Parrella/St. Anselm [Official Photo]

Peter Luger Steak House

Copy Link

There is no better steak anywhere in the world than Peter Luger’s porterhouse. Like South America, it consists of two land masses separated by an Andes of bone. Delivered on a tilted plate, the waiter spoons vivifying juices of the fatty, charred, and sizzling mass. Heaven could provide nothing more delightful. — Robert Sietsema, Eater NY senior critic

The Peter Luger porterhouse, cooked medium rare and displayed on a white plate Nick Solares/Eater

Miss Ada

Copy Link

I must profess that I am not one to order a huge hunk of beef anywhere. I hate the famous, massive prime rib at Smith & Wollensky, which gave me the disturbing sensation that I could be eating human flesh, and I don’t even like oversized “gourmet” burgers, which tend to be overwrought. Still, I do love the rich, indulgent flavor of beef in smaller portions — which is why I love the hanger steak at Miss Ada. It comes both at dinner and at brunch. It’s sliced into thin, tender pink coins and has a salty, charred crust. There’s always a bit of a bite to the texture, and there’s never a stray, stringy piece in sight that makes the chew take too long. I’ve gotten it four times this year, and it has yet to fail me. Plus, all the other light Middle Eastern fare at the restaurant balances it out. — Serena Dai, Eater NY editor

Loading comments...

Smith & Wollensky

My favorite places for everyday steak aren’t typically steakhouses — Korean barbecue spots like Cote or Jongro come to find as preferable for smaller portions — but for a perfect steakhouse steak, something big enough to require a martini to aid digestion, Smith & Wollensky’s prime rib is my true love. The interior of this mammoth cut is crimson, clean, and bloody, with a stiffly jiggly texture. It is meat that almost wobbles. The exterior cap, as beefy as Texas brisket, is dry-aged to such a degree that recalls a good gorgonzola. If any of this isn’t enough flavor, a giant pool of jus surrounds the whole thing, imparting an impressively round salinity. In fact two martinis might be the right call here. — Ryan Sutton, Eater NY chief critic

Medium rare prime rib on a white plate with creamed spinach in the background. Nick Solares/Eater

Cherry Point

When it comes to what I value in food, flavor, and texture are locked into first place and a good steak is nothing without a perfect ratio of crusted, salty exterior and a buttery interior of medium rare exactness. A steak thinner than prime rib achieves exactly that. Cherry Point’s steak — the cut can vary between hanger and ribeye — is my favorite in the city, thinly sliced with its pommes Anna and roasted shallots. It doesn’t feel like work to eat it, and I get the perfectly contrasted texture I seek in each bite. — Pelin Keskin, Eater video associate producer

Three pieces of medium rare steak on a plate with potatoes and shallots Cherry Point/Yelp [Official Photo]

Balthazar

To me, a steak dinner has a few mandatory components: a power vibe, unabashed nostalgia, and expertly prepared meat. Without those, I’m simply having steak for dinner — which is totally fine but also not the point. And so, the Balthazar steak frites is my New York ideal. That this particular dish arrives to a table in the always crowded, iconic Balthazar dining room ticks the first two boxes right off the bat. The steak, topped with an oversized pat of compound butter and decorated in crosshatch grill-marks, is the result of years of practice, and those fries are legend. — Hillary Dixler Canavan, Eater restaurant editor

The Palm Tribeca

Part of the Palm’s allure for me is deeply steeped in growing up with the brand, but nostalgia or not, I still staunchly stand by the chain’s porterhouse. It’s aged for a minimum of 35 days and always comes out perfectly medium rare, with tender, ruby-red insides and a crackly, charred crust. There’s no butter here; this steak doesn’t need it — it’s just straight-up bloody meat with a salty crust for true meat lovers. I should probably disclose that if you eat at the Tribeca location, you’ll see my caricature smiling down on you from the wall. — Stefanie Tuder, Eater NY senior editor

Steaks under a broiler Nick Solares/Eater

St. Anselm

St. Anselm is my go-to destination for steak for myriad reasons. First and foremost, the $28 butcher’s steak is probably the best deal in town as far as quality steaks go. Second, you get to sit at the bar in front of the grill and watch the chefs in their steak and veggie symphony. Third, everything else — the sides, the fish, the salads, the wine, the desserts — are truly excellent, so you’re not suffering through some sad creamed spinach in order to eat a great main dish. Also: The vibe is great, the women who run it seem like cool, decent people, and it’s in Williamsburg, so when I’m done, I am not battling tourists in Midtown or FiDi. — Amanda Kludt, Eater editor-in-chief

Slices of steak on a white plate with a floral design Michael Parrella/St. Anselm [Official Photo]

Peter Luger Steak House

There is no better steak anywhere in the world than Peter Luger’s porterhouse. Like South America, it consists of two land masses separated by an Andes of bone. Delivered on a tilted plate, the waiter spoons vivifying juices of the fatty, charred, and sizzling mass. Heaven could provide nothing more delightful. — Robert Sietsema, Eater NY senior critic

The Peter Luger porterhouse, cooked medium rare and displayed on a white plate Nick Solares/Eater

Miss Ada

I must profess that I am not one to order a huge hunk of beef anywhere. I hate the famous, massive prime rib at Smith & Wollensky, which gave me the disturbing sensation that I could be eating human flesh, and I don’t even like oversized “gourmet” burgers, which tend to be overwrought. Still, I do love the rich, indulgent flavor of beef in smaller portions — which is why I love the hanger steak at Miss Ada. It comes both at dinner and at brunch. It’s sliced into thin, tender pink coins and has a salty, charred crust. There’s always a bit of a bite to the texture, and there’s never a stray, stringy piece in sight that makes the chew take too long. I’ve gotten it four times this year, and it has yet to fail me. Plus, all the other light Middle Eastern fare at the restaurant balances it out. — Serena Dai, Eater NY editor

Related Maps