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Steak frites on a white plate with a fork and knife next to it
Balthazar’s steak frites
Nick Solares

15 Sizzling Steak Frites in NYC

Juicy slices of hanger with crunchy fries never get old

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Balthazar’s steak frites
| Nick Solares

In its combination of simple, visceral pleasures, steak frites can’t be beaten. But both can easily be butchered by poor ingredients or cooking — perhaps why the dish is still coveted at select venues. Here’s where to dig into satisfying French-ified beef and potatoes across New York City.

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Bar Boulud

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Daniel Boulud has been bringing smart, haute takes on French classics to New York for years. His modish Bar Boulud offers slightly more accessible items, including steak frites available with a bavette cut for $34 or dry-aged strip for $45, accompanied by béarnaise or bordelaise sauce.

Bar Boulud Bar Boulud/Facebook

Steak Freak

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This food cart is a sleeper option in the Midtown lunch scene, with its juicy, properly seared steak platters, including Thai-flavored beef with basil. But the real surprise is the ability to score generously plated and cheap steak frites — $10! — with extra-crispy fries on the street. Cash only.

Steak Freak
Steak Freak
Philippe B./Yelp

Le Relais de Venise L'Entrecote New York

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This outpost of a French chain doesn’t screw around with its steak frites. In fact, that’s the only entree it offers, drenching slices of beef with its signature green sauce. At $29.95, it’s a steal, especially since it comes with a bright salad of greens with mustard vinaigrette and walnuts — and seconds of steak and fries. There are decently priced French wines to accompany the cow, as well as at its additional Soho location.

L'Express

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L’Express delivers no-frills French bistro fare in a central Gramercy location that has open windows in nicer months. The food, including affordably priced steak ($29) with a nest of wonderfully crunchy French fries, is much better than it needs to be. Bonus: It’s open 24 hours, making it as ideal for business lunches as late-night beef-and-potato munchies.

La Ripaille

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This tiny West Village French restaurant with farmhouse decor, whose name translates to “the feast,” has become a destination for its well-executed classics. While pastas are weirdly present on the menu, per Robert Sietsema, stick to the broccoli mousse and a rare steak with fries drenched in three-peppercorn sauce.

La Ripaille
La Ripaille
Annie R./Yelp

Tartine

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This West Village stalwart is still a neighborhood favorite, drawing packed crowds into and outside of its minuscule space. The steak frites is one among many reliable and affordable classic bistro dishes, rounded out by unexpected items like spicy chicken with guacamole and fries. Cash only and BYOB-friendly.

Tartine Tartine [Official Photo]

Minetta Tavern

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Keith McNally’s Minetta Tavern leans heavily on New York nostalgia with its black-and-white checkered floor, red banquettes, and expense account-appropriate cuts of beef, but it executes it all so well that it’s impossible to hate. Get the beloved black label burger, made with dry-aged rib steak and topped with caramelized onions, but also move to rich steak frites served with maitre d’ butter or bearnaise sauce.

Minetta Tavern
Minetta Tavern
Photo via Minetta Tavern/Yelp

Lafayette

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Andrew Carmellini’s temple to French cuisine is a spacious place to linger, with comfortable outdoor seating. Dry-aged strip steak with fries and bearnaise butter is available all day at $44 but best enjoyed when the light hits just right through tall arched windows.

Lafayette
Lafayette
Yelp

David's Café

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This East Village standby from Daniel and BLT Market alum David Malbequi brings high-level execution to comfort staples in a relaxed, large-windowed space. Steak frites comes with an eight-ounce hanger steak and watercress with confit shallots.

David’s Café
David’s Café
David’s Café/Yelp

Raoul's

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Sure, a luxurious and extremely limited Pat LaFrieda burger gets all the attention at this four-decade-plus Soho haunt. But venture beyond the bar to the comfortable booths in the narrow restaurant for sophisticated takes on bistro fare. A large steak au poivre is slathered in peppercorn sauce and paired with fries cooked in duck fat.

Raoul’s
Raoul’s
Denise D./Yelp

Houseman

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Ned Baldwin, the chef-owner behind this spacious gastropub near the Hudson River, goes against the char fanatics by barely searing his hanger steaks in cast-iron pans before throwing them in the oven. They’re finished with butter, garlic, and herbs in the pan again for a beautifully pink piece of meat, accompanied by fries topped with pan juices.

Houseman
Houseman
Bel C./Yelp

Balthazar

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It’s now hard to conceive of Soho without Keith McNally’s luxe, expansive brasserie opened in 1997, home to the most powerful of power-lunches. Along with the dining room appointed with distressed mirrors and red banquettes and the flawless adjacent bakery, the steak frites with herbed butter or bearnaise sauce is classic.

Frenchette

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Riad Nasr and Lee Hanson’s Tribeca bistro brings a modern, remixed vibe to the formula in an airy, gorgeously appointed space. That includes a smartly executed steak frites where the cut varies, plus duck frites, an indulgent variation on the classic. The fries here are among the best in the city.

Red booths and wooden tables set for dinner service in a well-light dining room with horizontal mirrors hanging on the walls Photo by Alex Staniloff

Walter Foods

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There’s nothing wrong with the classic buttery French steak frites. But the pleasing, white brick-walled Walter Foods in Williamsburg makes its nine-ounce skirt steak stand out with Latin American flavor. In addition to greens and shoestring fries, the dish arrives with salted horseradish cream and chimichurri, a vibrant dairy alternative.

Walter Foods
Walter Foods
Kerry O./Yelp

Bar Tabac

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Find French expats lingering and smoking at outside tables at this longtime, trusted Cobble Hill bistro. While nothing exactly blows the mind, solid dishes in a relaxed, wood-lined setting include a 10-ounce grilled shell steak with fries and mixed greens.

Foosball next to windows at Bar Tabac
Bar Tabac
Bar Tabac

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Bar Boulud

Daniel Boulud has been bringing smart, haute takes on French classics to New York for years. His modish Bar Boulud offers slightly more accessible items, including steak frites available with a bavette cut for $34 or dry-aged strip for $45, accompanied by béarnaise or bordelaise sauce.

Bar Boulud Bar Boulud/Facebook

Steak Freak

This food cart is a sleeper option in the Midtown lunch scene, with its juicy, properly seared steak platters, including Thai-flavored beef with basil. But the real surprise is the ability to score generously plated and cheap steak frites — $10! — with extra-crispy fries on the street. Cash only.

Steak Freak
Steak Freak
Philippe B./Yelp

Le Relais de Venise L'Entrecote New York

This outpost of a French chain doesn’t screw around with its steak frites. In fact, that’s the only entree it offers, drenching slices of beef with its signature green sauce. At $29.95, it’s a steal, especially since it comes with a bright salad of greens with mustard vinaigrette and walnuts — and seconds of steak and fries. There are decently priced French wines to accompany the cow, as well as at its additional Soho location.

L'Express

L’Express delivers no-frills French bistro fare in a central Gramercy location that has open windows in nicer months. The food, including affordably priced steak ($29) with a nest of wonderfully crunchy French fries, is much better than it needs to be. Bonus: It’s open 24 hours, making it as ideal for business lunches as late-night beef-and-potato munchies.

La Ripaille

This tiny West Village French restaurant with farmhouse decor, whose name translates to “the feast,” has become a destination for its well-executed classics. While pastas are weirdly present on the menu, per Robert Sietsema, stick to the broccoli mousse and a rare steak with fries drenched in three-peppercorn sauce.

La Ripaille
La Ripaille
Annie R./Yelp

Tartine

This West Village stalwart is still a neighborhood favorite, drawing packed crowds into and outside of its minuscule space. The steak frites is one among many reliable and affordable classic bistro dishes, rounded out by unexpected items like spicy chicken with guacamole and fries. Cash only and BYOB-friendly.

Tartine Tartine [Official Photo]

Minetta Tavern

Keith McNally’s Minetta Tavern leans heavily on New York nostalgia with its black-and-white checkered floor, red banquettes, and expense account-appropriate cuts of beef, but it executes it all so well that it’s impossible to hate. Get the beloved black label burger, made with dry-aged rib steak and topped with caramelized onions, but also move to rich steak frites served with maitre d’ butter or bearnaise sauce.

Minetta Tavern
Minetta Tavern
Photo via Minetta Tavern/Yelp

Lafayette

Andrew Carmellini’s temple to French cuisine is a spacious place to linger, with comfortable outdoor seating. Dry-aged strip steak with fries and bearnaise butter is available all day at $44 but best enjoyed when the light hits just right through tall arched windows.

Lafayette
Lafayette
Yelp

David's Café

This East Village standby from Daniel and BLT Market alum David Malbequi brings high-level execution to comfort staples in a relaxed, large-windowed space. Steak frites comes with an eight-ounce hanger steak and watercress with confit shallots.

David’s Café
David’s Café
David’s Café/Yelp

Raoul's

Sure, a luxurious and extremely limited Pat LaFrieda burger gets all the attention at this four-decade-plus Soho haunt. But venture beyond the bar to the comfortable booths in the narrow restaurant for sophisticated takes on bistro fare. A large steak au poivre is slathered in peppercorn sauce and paired with fries cooked in duck fat.

Raoul’s
Raoul’s
Denise D./Yelp

Houseman

Ned Baldwin, the chef-owner behind this spacious gastropub near the Hudson River, goes against the char fanatics by barely searing his hanger steaks in cast-iron pans before throwing them in the oven. They’re finished with butter, garlic, and herbs in the pan again for a beautifully pink piece of meat, accompanied by fries topped with pan juices.

Houseman
Houseman
Bel C./Yelp

Balthazar

It’s now hard to conceive of Soho without Keith McNally’s luxe, expansive brasserie opened in 1997, home to the most powerful of power-lunches. Along with the dining room appointed with distressed mirrors and red banquettes and the flawless adjacent bakery, the steak frites with herbed butter or bearnaise sauce is classic.

Frenchette

Riad Nasr and Lee Hanson’s Tribeca bistro brings a modern, remixed vibe to the formula in an airy, gorgeously appointed space. That includes a smartly executed steak frites where the cut varies, plus duck frites, an indulgent variation on the classic. The fries here are among the best in the city.

Red booths and wooden tables set for dinner service in a well-light dining room with horizontal mirrors hanging on the walls Photo by Alex Staniloff

Walter Foods

There’s nothing wrong with the classic buttery French steak frites. But the pleasing, white brick-walled Walter Foods in Williamsburg makes its nine-ounce skirt steak stand out with Latin American flavor. In addition to greens and shoestring fries, the dish arrives with salted horseradish cream and chimichurri, a vibrant dairy alternative.

Walter Foods
Walter Foods
Kerry O./Yelp

Bar Tabac

Find French expats lingering and smoking at outside tables at this longtime, trusted Cobble Hill bistro. While nothing exactly blows the mind, solid dishes in a relaxed, wood-lined setting include a 10-ounce grilled shell steak with fries and mixed greens.

Foosball next to windows at Bar Tabac
Bar Tabac
Bar Tabac

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