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Hana Noodle Photo via Hana Noodle

19 Addictive Spicy Noodles in NYC

Some Eater favorite bowls at a handful of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese spots

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New York City’s spiciest noodles run across various Asian cuisines but prove addictive in them all. Here are some of Eater’s favorite noodle dishes around town that incorporate vectors of hotness — by way of fresh green or red chiles, chile paste, chile oil, dried chiles, black or white peppercorns, Sichuan peppercorns, or even wasabi and hot German mustard. No matter the method, prepare for heat.

Note: This list is arranged geographically, from west to east.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Western Yunnan Crossing Bridge Noodle

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705 59th St
Brooklyn, NY 11220

This Sunset Park subterranean spot specializes in one type of Yunnan rice noodle dish — crossing the bridge noodles — done many ways, some of them incendiary. Try spicy beef navel rice noodle, which features brisket, chile oil, and plenty of Sichuan peppercorns, reminding diners of the proximity of Yunnan and Sichuan.

2. Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam Zhu's Kitchen

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401 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY
(212) 633-8900
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Hao Noodle and Tea is the first American branch of Madam Zhu’s Kitchen, founded in 2008, with six locations in Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing, and other Chinese cities. The best deal on the menu might be the ma milky mung bean jelly stacked like railroad ties and enhanced by crunchy peanuts for the spiciest vegan bowl in town. Other Sichuan standards include a version of dan dan mian with the softest noodles imaginable.

3. Legend Bar & Restaurant 蜀留香

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88 7th Ave
New York, NY
(212) 929-1778
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This no-frills Sichuan spot in Chelsea serves Cantonese, Vietnamese, and Sichuan dishes but the latter is its strength, especially the liangfen jelly noodles with chile sauce that are saltier and spicier than elsewhere.

4. Yiwanmen

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150 Mott St
New York, NY

Fast-casual noodle house Yiwanmen serves Chongqing-style red oil noodles swimming in chile oil, heaped with cilantro and Chinese celery, and lashed with Sichuan peppercorns. Ground pork studs the depths. Past this spicy option, there are 12 noodle selections as well as daily specials like bing.

5. Flaming Kitchen 蜀客

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97 Bowery
New York, NY

Walk past the bouncer for the upstairs karaoke bar and go straight to the dining room of Flaming Kitchen, where nearly everything that qualifies as a Sichuan dish on the menu will be solid. Stick with the dan dan noodles or house special beef flank noodle soup (shown).

6. Spicy Village

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68B Forsyth St
New York, NY
(212) 625-8299
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The hui mian, or hand-pulled noodles, at Spicy Village make a great base for any of the restaurant’s soups or dishes, but the best bet is to add them to the big tray of spicy chicken. Let the rich, garlicky broth of the chicken dish coat the noodles for the ideal spicy noodle experience. Eat them immediately. It’s very a small restaurant and has up to 40-minute waits at weekend dinner. BYOB.

7. Hot Kitchen

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104 2nd Ave
New York, NY
(212) 228-3090
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The East Village location of this Sichuan restaurant is regularly packed, but it’s far easier to get into than nearby Han Dynasty. Not everything on the expansive menu will be a hit, though. At least one surefire order: any of the spicy noodles on the appetizer section. The hot and sour sweet potato noodle soup in particular is worth picking up.

Hot and sour sweet potato noodle soup

8. Xi'an Famous Foods

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38 E 23rd St
New York, NY

The family-owned local chain has a slew of spicy noodle options that will fulfill a craving, but the liang pi, or cold-skinned noodles, is a stand-out. The meat-free cold dish with pieces of spongey gluten is spicy, nutty, and just a little bit sweet.

Xi'an Famous Foods

9. Little Tong Noodle Shop

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177 1st Avenue
New York, NY 10003
(929) 367-8664
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East Village mixian noodle shop Little Tong advertises its cold chicken mala noodles as a “tearjerker.” It’s a combination of pulled chicken, chilled spicy broth, pickled cucumbers, shallot chips, and Yunnan’s famed, fermented, non-glutinous rice noodles, called mixian. A citrus soy imparts the noodles with an acidic punch, followed by a mid-level heat — a pleasant “October in Los Angeles” warmth rather than “Las Vegas summer.” Torn bits of fowl provide chew and a delicate poultry tang, and then the Sichuan peppercorn numbingness sets in.

Little Tong Photo by Ryan Sutton

10. Momofuku Noodle Bar

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171 1st Ave
New York, NY
(212) 777-7773
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Without question the spiciest thing on the menu at any Momofuku restaurant: firm ramen noodles that are tossed with Sichuan sausage, spinach, and candied cashews. This isn’t a study in mala numbingness; it’s delicious capsicum-induced pain, which builds with furious intensity. Once upon a time an employee at Noodle Bar told an Eater staffer that it’s a dish he could only eat once a week, max. Share it.

11. Hana Noodle Station Inc

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445 Albee Square W
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(929) 359-6555
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Situated in Downtown Brooklyn food hall DeKalb Market, Hana Noodles offers standout noodle soup. New Yorkers won’t find a better version of this classic soup from Central China — the hand-pulled noodles are plump, the beef appropriately diverse (a bit of tendon here, a bit of brisket there), and the dab of hot paste in the center sets the bowl on fire.

Hana Noodle Station Photo by Robert Sietsema

12. Poonglim

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2053 Lemoine Ave
Fort Lee, NJ 07024

Puffy and springy wheat noodles are a perfect match for tentacles of baby octopus in the Korean dish found just across the river in Fort Lee, New Jersey. And the ferry ride over there and ensuing bus connection is half the fun.

13. Lava Kitchen

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2656 Broadway
New York, NY
(718) 489-9917
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The menu is mainly northern Chinese, and classic dumplings, bao, cold salads, and grilled meat skewers form part of the menu. But the real action is in the section called Ma La Tang, which presents noodle soups in three levels of spiciness, from No Spicy to More Spicy. The heat is achieved with chile oil, chile flakes, and, of course, Sichuan peppercorns. The section of the menu called Noodles also offers several spicy dishes, including a wonderful “chilly and sour rice noodle soup,” which features mung bean thread, peanuts, and ground pork in a bright-red slurry. 

14. Pye Boat Noodle

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35-13 Broadway
Astoria, NY
(718) 685-2329
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This lively Astoria restaurant specializes in Thai noodles in a tropical-canteen setting, and any of the noodles can be adjusted to exact heat specifications, with an extra bowl of bird’s-eye chiles on the side. Boat noodles is a signature — rice noodles with pork balls, sliced pork, and bonus curls of pork skin floating on top.

15. Thai Diva Cuisine

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45-53 46th street
Woodside, NY
(929) 208-0282
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Don’t miss the spicy udon shrimp at Thai Diva in Woodside, a neat little shoebox of a place where the food is often tongue searing. Take this dish of spicy shrimp udon, demonstrating not only the influence of Japanese food on contemporary Siamese cooking, but also just how hot food can get using a simple red pepper paste.

16. Sweet Yummy House 三好小馆

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8313 Broadway
Elmhurst, NY
(718) 878-6603
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For Sichuan peppercorn fanatics, try the vegetarian dish listed as cold jelly Chengdu-style. It’s slippery mung bean jelly noodles, served cold with tons of hot chiles, numbing Sichuan peppercorn, bracing black vinegar, and bright scallion.

17. Little Pepper

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18-24 College Point Blvd
New York, NY
(718) 939-7788

In a location that feels more small town than NYC, Little Pepper serves destination-worthy Sichuan fare. Get the spicy cold noodle for a straightforward starter, along with pickled cowpea with minced pork, the double-cooked style Sichuan pork with leeks, and more.

18. Spicy Lanka

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159-23 Hillside Ave
Jamaica, NY

It’s up to diners to match one of the spicier curries with string hoppers — the extruded Sri Lankan noodles made from a batter and coiled into little nests. Fish curry is one of the spiciest at this Queens halal restaurant, and when spooned over hoppers, the result is a serious mouth burn.

19. Grain House

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249-11 Northern Blvd
Little Neck, NY
(718) 229-8788

This Sichuan outpost just over the Queens line offers Sichuan favorites. But for something really incendiary, order the Yibin burning noodles, named for a small city in southeastern Sichuan. Found on the restaurant’s separate brunch menu, noodles come gobbed with sweet soy sauce, red chile flakes, and Sichuan peppercorns, which leaves diners gasping and reaching for water. In addition to a little ground pork it also contains Sichuan peppercorns, ground chile, soy sauce, scallions, sesame seeds, and peanuts.

1. Western Yunnan Crossing Bridge Noodle

705 59th St, Brooklyn, NY 11220

This Sunset Park subterranean spot specializes in one type of Yunnan rice noodle dish — crossing the bridge noodles — done many ways, some of them incendiary. Try spicy beef navel rice noodle, which features brisket, chile oil, and plenty of Sichuan peppercorns, reminding diners of the proximity of Yunnan and Sichuan.

705 59th St
Brooklyn, NY 11220

2. Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam Zhu's Kitchen

401 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY
Read Review |

Hao Noodle and Tea is the first American branch of Madam Zhu’s Kitchen, founded in 2008, with six locations in Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing, and other Chinese cities. The best deal on the menu might be the ma milky mung bean jelly stacked like railroad ties and enhanced by crunchy peanuts for the spiciest vegan bowl in town. Other Sichuan standards include a version of dan dan mian with the softest noodles imaginable.

401 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY

3. Legend Bar & Restaurant 蜀留香

88 7th Ave, New York, NY

This no-frills Sichuan spot in Chelsea serves Cantonese, Vietnamese, and Sichuan dishes but the latter is its strength, especially the liangfen jelly noodles with chile sauce that are saltier and spicier than elsewhere.

88 7th Ave
New York, NY

4. Yiwanmen

150 Mott St, New York, NY

Fast-casual noodle house Yiwanmen serves Chongqing-style red oil noodles swimming in chile oil, heaped with cilantro and Chinese celery, and lashed with Sichuan peppercorns. Ground pork studs the depths. Past this spicy option, there are 12 noodle selections as well as daily specials like bing.

150 Mott St
New York, NY

5. Flaming Kitchen 蜀客

97 Bowery, New York, NY
Read Review |

Walk past the bouncer for the upstairs karaoke bar and go straight to the dining room of Flaming Kitchen, where nearly everything that qualifies as a Sichuan dish on the menu will be solid. Stick with the dan dan noodles or house special beef flank noodle soup (shown).

97 Bowery
New York, NY

6. Spicy Village

68B Forsyth St, New York, NY

The hui mian, or hand-pulled noodles, at Spicy Village make a great base for any of the restaurant’s soups or dishes, but the best bet is to add them to the big tray of spicy chicken. Let the rich, garlicky broth of the chicken dish coat the noodles for the ideal spicy noodle experience. Eat them immediately. It’s very a small restaurant and has up to 40-minute waits at weekend dinner. BYOB.

68B Forsyth St
New York, NY

7. Hot Kitchen

104 2nd Ave, New York, NY
Hot and sour sweet potato noodle soup

The East Village location of this Sichuan restaurant is regularly packed, but it’s far easier to get into than nearby Han Dynasty. Not everything on the expansive menu will be a hit, though. At least one surefire order: any of the spicy noodles on the appetizer section. The hot and sour sweet potato noodle soup in particular is worth picking up.

104 2nd Ave
New York, NY

8. Xi'an Famous Foods

38 E 23rd St, New York, NY
Xi'an Famous Foods

The family-owned local chain has a slew of spicy noodle options that will fulfill a craving, but the liang pi, or cold-skinned noodles, is a stand-out. The meat-free cold dish with pieces of spongey gluten is spicy, nutty, and just a little bit sweet.

38 E 23rd St
New York, NY

9. Little Tong Noodle Shop

177 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10003
Little Tong Photo by Ryan Sutton

East Village mixian noodle shop Little Tong advertises its cold chicken mala noodles as a “tearjerker.” It’s a combination of pulled chicken, chilled spicy broth, pickled cucumbers, shallot chips, and Yunnan’s famed, fermented, non-glutinous rice noodles, called mixian. A citrus soy imparts the noodles with an acidic punch, followed by a mid-level heat — a pleasant “October in Los Angeles” warmth rather than “Las Vegas summer.” Torn bits of fowl provide chew and a delicate poultry tang, and then the Sichuan peppercorn numbingness sets in.

177 1st Avenue
New York, NY 10003

10. Momofuku Noodle Bar

171 1st Ave, New York, NY

Without question the spiciest thing on the menu at any Momofuku restaurant: firm ramen noodles that are tossed with Sichuan sausage, spinach, and candied cashews. This isn’t a study in mala numbingness; it’s delicious capsicum-induced pain, which builds with furious intensity. Once upon a time an employee at Noodle Bar told an Eater staffer that it’s a dish he could only eat once a week, max. Share it.

171 1st Ave
New York, NY

11. Hana Noodle Station Inc

445 Albee Square W, Brooklyn, NY 11201
Hana Noodle Station Photo by Robert Sietsema

Situated in Downtown Brooklyn food hall DeKalb Market, Hana Noodles offers standout noodle soup. New Yorkers won’t find a better version of this classic soup from Central China — the hand-pulled noodles are plump, the beef appropriately diverse (a bit of tendon here, a bit of brisket there), and the dab of hot paste in the center sets the bowl on fire.

445 Albee Square W
Brooklyn, NY 11201

12. Poonglim

2053 Lemoine Ave, Fort Lee, NJ 07024

Puffy and springy wheat noodles are a perfect match for tentacles of baby octopus in the Korean dish found just across the river in Fort Lee, New Jersey. And the ferry ride over there and ensuing bus connection is half the fun.

2053 Lemoine Ave
Fort Lee, NJ 07024

13. Lava Kitchen

2656 Broadway, New York, NY

The menu is mainly northern Chinese, and classic dumplings, bao, cold salads, and grilled meat skewers form part of the menu. But the real action is in the section called Ma La Tang, which presents noodle soups in three levels of spiciness, from No Spicy to More Spicy. The heat is achieved with chile oil, chile flakes, and, of course, Sichuan peppercorns. The section of the menu called Noodles also offers several spicy dishes, including a wonderful “chilly and sour rice noodle soup,” which features mung bean thread, peanuts, and ground pork in a bright-red slurry. 

2656 Broadway
New York, NY

14. Pye Boat Noodle

35-13 Broadway, Astoria, NY
Read Review |

This lively Astoria restaurant specializes in Thai noodles in a tropical-canteen setting, and any of the noodles can be adjusted to exact heat specifications, with an extra bowl of bird’s-eye chiles on the side. Boat noodles is a signature — rice noodles with pork balls, sliced pork, and bonus curls of pork skin floating on top.

35-13 Broadway
Astoria, NY

15. Thai Diva Cuisine

45-53 46th street, Woodside, NY
Read Review |

Don’t miss the spicy udon shrimp at Thai Diva in Woodside, a neat little shoebox of a place where the food is often tongue searing. Take this dish of spicy shrimp udon, demonstrating not only the influence of Japanese food on contemporary Siamese cooking, but also just how hot food can get using a simple red pepper paste.

45-53 46th street
Woodside, NY

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16. Sweet Yummy House 三好小馆

8313 Broadway, Elmhurst, NY

For Sichuan peppercorn fanatics, try the vegetarian dish listed as cold jelly Chengdu-style. It’s slippery mung bean jelly noodles, served cold with tons of hot chiles, numbing Sichuan peppercorn, bracing black vinegar, and bright scallion.

8313 Broadway
Elmhurst, NY

17. Little Pepper

18-24 College Point Blvd, New York, NY

In a location that feels more small town than NYC, Little Pepper serves destination-worthy Sichuan fare. Get the spicy cold noodle for a straightforward starter, along with pickled cowpea with minced pork, the double-cooked style Sichuan pork with leeks, and more.

18-24 College Point Blvd
New York, NY

18. Spicy Lanka

159-23 Hillside Ave, Jamaica, NY

It’s up to diners to match one of the spicier curries with string hoppers — the extruded Sri Lankan noodles made from a batter and coiled into little nests. Fish curry is one of the spiciest at this Queens halal restaurant, and when spooned over hoppers, the result is a serious mouth burn.

159-23 Hillside Ave
Jamaica, NY

19. Grain House

249-11 Northern Blvd, Little Neck, NY
Read Review |

This Sichuan outpost just over the Queens line offers Sichuan favorites. But for something really incendiary, order the Yibin burning noodles, named for a small city in southeastern Sichuan. Found on the restaurant’s separate brunch menu, noodles come gobbed with sweet soy sauce, red chile flakes, and Sichuan peppercorns, which leaves diners gasping and reaching for water. In addition to a little ground pork it also contains Sichuan peppercorns, ground chile, soy sauce, scallions, sesame seeds, and peanuts.

249-11 Northern Blvd
Little Neck, NY

Related Maps