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White xiao mian noodles, green cilantro, and brown nuggets of ground pork barely sit above a pool of orange broth in a black bowl.
Chongqing Xiao Mian at Chong Qing Noodle
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

15 Soul-Warming Soups for Cold Weather Months in NYC

From wonton to avgolemono, here’s where to find a stellar steaming bowl of soup around town

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Chongqing Xiao Mian at Chong Qing Noodle
| Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

Soup weather is fast-approaching in New York City. For diners soon-to-be bundled in layers and snuggling next to outdoor heaters or staying indoors in the comforts of their own homes, there are endless options for steaming bowls of soups. Whether it’s a Korean take on gumbo or a piping bowl of goat birria soup, restaurants all across town are offering soul-warming selections. (If it’s pho, ramen, or hot pot you seek — check out those individual maps.)

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Beef Pho at Cơm Tấm Ninh Kiều

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Nhu Ton and John Nguyen have been getting attention lately for Bánh Vietnamese Shop House, their Upper West Side spot fast-becoming one of the year’s hottest new openings. But the team’s original restaurant in the Bronx is still one of the city’s most important Vietnamese spots, and one where you can find us slurping a bowl of piping hot pho served with brisket, tendon, tripe, and beef ball.

Asopao at Calle 191 Pescaderia

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Located in Washington Heights, Calle 191 Pescaderia excels at all things Spanish and Latin-Caribbean seafood. Stop by for its Dominican asopao, a tomato and vinegar rice soup with big hunks of shrimp and a confetti of unctuous rice. Finish it off with a hit of lime.

A rice-based yellow soup with hunks of shrimp is served in a bowl ontop of a red Chinese plate with three slices of lime.
The asopao.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Goat Birria Soup at Las Delicias Mexicanas

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Though quesabirria tacos and birria mulitas are big in New York right now, East Harlem gem Las Delicias focuses on a more traditional look at the dish. Las Delicias’ goat birria with hunks of carrots are one of the city’s most comforting bowls of soup for the season.

A spoon is dipped into an orange and red soup filled with birria and carrot in a white bowl.
Soup at Las Delicias
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Chongqing Xiao Mian at Chong Qing Noodle

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Chinese xiao mian is less often seen in New York City, than, say, Yunnanese mixian. But the mala chongqing xiao mian at this Hell’s Kitchen spot, sometimes also referred to as Chongqing Noodle House, is making a name for itself in a part of Manhattan with a growing group of Sinosphere restaurants. Eater critic Ryan Sutton says you can choose from the thin, stringy noodles or the thicker, knife-cut option — your stomach will be happy no matter what you decide.

A bowl of soup filled with sweet ground pork.
A bowl of soup filled with sweet ground pork.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

Seafood kalguksu at Monkey Noodle Bar

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This classic Korean seafood kalguksu ($15) is a favorite for a reason: The clear seafood broth is often spilling over with knife-cut wheat flour noodles and a generous portion of mussels, squid, and shrimp swimming around. It’s hearty but not heavy, and the large bowl is easily shareable for two.

Crossing the Bridge Noodles at Deng Ji Yunnan Guoqiao Mixian

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The Flushing branch of this noodle spot is serving one of Eater critic Robert Sietsema’s favorite dishes of 2021 thus far. The deluxe version of the crossing the bridge noodles comes with 14 small bowls, meant to be poured into the hot soup. Among them are Spam, radish slivers, pork skin, lotus shoots, and a fish filet.

A black bowl of rice noodles in broth with several additional ingredients.
Crossing The Bridge Noodles at Deng Ji.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Homestyle chicken soup at Margon

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The Cubano sandwich gets most of the attention at this popular Midtown lunch counter, but it’s the chicken soup ($4.50 and $8.75 for a small and large, respectively) that shouldn’t be missed. The viscous broth — think Campbell’s chicken noodle soup consistency but homemade — looks like it’s been bubbling away for days. Generous chunks of bone-in chicken, potatoes, and yam make this an idyllic meal for any cold day.

Pickle Soup at Karczma

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We’ll say it right now: New York needs more pickle soup. And this version from Polish stalwart Karczma in Greenpoint is making one of the strongest cases for it at $5.50. Customers who are the kind of people who like pickle-backs or sipping on the juice at the end of the pickle jar will enjoy this creamy-yet-acidic soup that has slivers of chopped cucumber pickles.

Matzo Ball at B&H Dairy

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Jewish classics still feel fresh at B&H Dairy, the luncheonette that’s been serving up Kosher dishes out of its East Village restaurant since the 1930s. Like all good matzo ball soup, B&H Dairy’s version has dill, carrots, and noodles to compliment its perfectly buoyant balls. But what sets B&H apart is its well-priced soup specials. If you’re feeling especially ravenous, we suggest going for the customer-created “Tieso” which includes stuffed cabbage, two fried pierogi, and one latke with tomato sauce and a cup of a soup of your choice.

Gumbo at Mokyo

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Kyungmin “Kay” Hyun uses a hint of pepper from her native Korea along with nasturtium in this take on gumbo. She mixes tiger shrimp with crawfish, throws in the classic Andouille sausage, and adds the “holy trinity’’ of onions, bell pepper and celery, but excludes traditional okra.

Gumbo at Mokyo
Gumbo at Mokyo

Colombian Chicken Soup at Empanada Mama

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The chicken soup ($11.75) at this 24-hour Colombian diner in Hell’s Kitchen will heat up your bones at all hours. Cooks imbue the golden broth, studded with hunks of torn thigh meat, with a particularly intense poultry flavor; the soup is so rich with collagens it will gel up in your fridge. Be sure to spoon in soft grains of white or yellow rice (included) to add a bit of nourishing starchiness, and ask the kitchen to add a fistful of cilantro to amp up the fragrance factor.

The entryway at Empanada Mama reads “Open 24 Hours.”
Empanada Mame is open 24-hours a day.
Gary He/Eater NY

Wonton Noodle Soup at Mee Sum Cafe

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This Cantonese spot on Pell Street, serves up a classic Chinatown wonton soup made expertly. The thin wonton wrappers show pork-filling waiting to burst through, with the right amount of greens to give the soup a rounded crunch. You simply cannot go wrong here.

A bowl of soup with dumplings greens and yellowish curvy noodles.
Wonton noodle soup.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Avgolemono at Yia Yia's Taverna

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Chicken Soup for the Soul comes to mind when spooning out servings of this avgolemono from Yia Yia’s Taverna, a Greek restaurant on Bushwick’s Flushing Avenue — one of the area’s more underrated establishments. The cozy, chickeny lemon soup is exactly what we want a big bowl of next time we come down with the chills.

The avgolemono soup at Yia Yia’s Taverna.
The avgolemono soup at Yia Yia’s Taverna.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Tortilla Soup at Chavela's

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Head to this Crown Heights corner restaurant for a lesser-seen preparation of tortilla soup that’s rendered bright green from a tomatillo — rather than tomato — base. Eight dollars gets you a shallow, wide-rimmed bowl of the thick and tangy broth, busy with chunks of pulled chicken, squiggles of crema, and a few floating tortilla strips.

Cowheel Soup at German's Soup

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Known for its thick, Guyanese soups that are as hearty as stews, this Brooklyn spot uses a base of yucca, plantains, and corn chocked with flour dumplings; then serves it simply vegetarian or with beef, chicken, oxtail, or cow heel. Thanks to its natural gelatin, the hoof version is particularly viscous.

Beef Pho at Cơm Tấm Ninh Kiều

Nhu Ton and John Nguyen have been getting attention lately for Bánh Vietnamese Shop House, their Upper West Side spot fast-becoming one of the year’s hottest new openings. But the team’s original restaurant in the Bronx is still one of the city’s most important Vietnamese spots, and one where you can find us slurping a bowl of piping hot pho served with brisket, tendon, tripe, and beef ball.

Asopao at Calle 191 Pescaderia

A rice-based yellow soup with hunks of shrimp is served in a bowl ontop of a red Chinese plate with three slices of lime.
The asopao.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Located in Washington Heights, Calle 191 Pescaderia excels at all things Spanish and Latin-Caribbean seafood. Stop by for its Dominican asopao, a tomato and vinegar rice soup with big hunks of shrimp and a confetti of unctuous rice. Finish it off with a hit of lime.

A rice-based yellow soup with hunks of shrimp is served in a bowl ontop of a red Chinese plate with three slices of lime.
The asopao.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Goat Birria Soup at Las Delicias Mexicanas

A spoon is dipped into an orange and red soup filled with birria and carrot in a white bowl.
Soup at Las Delicias
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Though quesabirria tacos and birria mulitas are big in New York right now, East Harlem gem Las Delicias focuses on a more traditional look at the dish. Las Delicias’ goat birria with hunks of carrots are one of the city’s most comforting bowls of soup for the season.

A spoon is dipped into an orange and red soup filled with birria and carrot in a white bowl.
Soup at Las Delicias
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Chongqing Xiao Mian at Chong Qing Noodle

A bowl of soup filled with sweet ground pork.
A bowl of soup filled with sweet ground pork.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

Chinese xiao mian is less often seen in New York City, than, say, Yunnanese mixian. But the mala chongqing xiao mian at this Hell’s Kitchen spot, sometimes also referred to as Chongqing Noodle House, is making a name for itself in a part of Manhattan with a growing group of Sinosphere restaurants. Eater critic Ryan Sutton says you can choose from the thin, stringy noodles or the thicker, knife-cut option — your stomach will be happy no matter what you decide.

A bowl of soup filled with sweet ground pork.
A bowl of soup filled with sweet ground pork.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

Seafood kalguksu at Monkey Noodle Bar

This classic Korean seafood kalguksu ($15) is a favorite for a reason: The clear seafood broth is often spilling over with knife-cut wheat flour noodles and a generous portion of mussels, squid, and shrimp swimming around. It’s hearty but not heavy, and the large bowl is easily shareable for two.

Crossing the Bridge Noodles at Deng Ji Yunnan Guoqiao Mixian

A black bowl of rice noodles in broth with several additional ingredients.
Crossing The Bridge Noodles at Deng Ji.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Flushing branch of this noodle spot is serving one of Eater critic Robert Sietsema’s favorite dishes of 2021 thus far. The deluxe version of the crossing the bridge noodles comes with 14 small bowls, meant to be poured into the hot soup. Among them are Spam, radish slivers, pork skin, lotus shoots, and a fish filet.

A black bowl of rice noodles in broth with several additional ingredients.
Crossing The Bridge Noodles at Deng Ji.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Homestyle chicken soup at Margon

The Cubano sandwich gets most of the attention at this popular Midtown lunch counter, but it’s the chicken soup ($4.50 and $8.75 for a small and large, respectively) that shouldn’t be missed. The viscous broth — think Campbell’s chicken noodle soup consistency but homemade — looks like it’s been bubbling away for days. Generous chunks of bone-in chicken, potatoes, and yam make this an idyllic meal for any cold day.

Pickle Soup at Karczma

We’ll say it right now: New York needs more pickle soup. And this version from Polish stalwart Karczma in Greenpoint is making one of the strongest cases for it at $5.50. Customers who are the kind of people who like pickle-backs or sipping on the juice at the end of the pickle jar will enjoy this creamy-yet-acidic soup that has slivers of chopped cucumber pickles.

Matzo Ball at B&H Dairy

Jewish classics still feel fresh at B&H Dairy, the luncheonette that’s been serving up Kosher dishes out of its East Village restaurant since the 1930s. Like all good matzo ball soup, B&H Dairy’s version has dill, carrots, and noodles to compliment its perfectly buoyant balls. But what sets B&H apart is its well-priced soup specials. If you’re feeling especially ravenous, we suggest going for the customer-created “Tieso” which includes stuffed cabbage, two fried pierogi, and one latke with tomato sauce and a cup of a soup of your choice.

Gumbo at Mokyo

Gumbo at Mokyo
Gumbo at Mokyo

Kyungmin “Kay” Hyun uses a hint of pepper from her native Korea along with nasturtium in this take on gumbo. She mixes tiger shrimp with crawfish, throws in the classic Andouille sausage, and adds the “holy trinity’’ of onions, bell pepper and celery, but excludes traditional okra.

Gumbo at Mokyo
Gumbo at Mokyo

Colombian Chicken Soup at Empanada Mama

The entryway at Empanada Mama reads “Open 24 Hours.”
Empanada Mame is open 24-hours a day.
Gary He/Eater NY

The chicken soup ($11.75) at this 24-hour Colombian diner in Hell’s Kitchen will heat up your bones at all hours. Cooks imbue the golden broth, studded with hunks of torn thigh meat, with a particularly intense poultry flavor; the soup is so rich with collagens it will gel up in your fridge. Be sure to spoon in soft grains of white or yellow rice (included) to add a bit of nourishing starchiness, and ask the kitchen to add a fistful of cilantro to amp up the fragrance factor.

The entryway at Empanada Mama reads “Open 24 Hours.”
Empanada Mame is open 24-hours a day.
Gary He/Eater NY

Wonton Noodle Soup at Mee Sum Cafe

A bowl of soup with dumplings greens and yellowish curvy noodles.
Wonton noodle soup.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This Cantonese spot on Pell Street, serves up a classic Chinatown wonton soup made expertly. The thin wonton wrappers show pork-filling waiting to burst through, with the right amount of greens to give the soup a rounded crunch. You simply cannot go wrong here.

A bowl of soup with dumplings greens and yellowish curvy noodles.
Wonton noodle soup.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Avgolemono at Yia Yia's Taverna

The avgolemono soup at Yia Yia’s Taverna.
The avgolemono soup at Yia Yia’s Taverna.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Chicken Soup for the Soul comes to mind when spooning out servings of this avgolemono from Yia Yia’s Taverna, a Greek restaurant on Bushwick’s Flushing Avenue — one of the area’s more underrated establishments. The cozy, chickeny lemon soup is exactly what we want a big bowl of next time we come down with the chills.

The avgolemono soup at Yia Yia’s Taverna.
The avgolemono soup at Yia Yia’s Taverna.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Tortilla Soup at Chavela's

Head to this Crown Heights corner restaurant for a lesser-seen preparation of tortilla soup that’s rendered bright green from a tomatillo — rather than tomato — base. Eight dollars gets you a shallow, wide-rimmed bowl of the thick and tangy broth, busy with chunks of pulled chicken, squiggles of crema, and a few floating tortilla strips.

Cowheel Soup at German's Soup

Known for its thick, Guyanese soups that are as hearty as stews, this Brooklyn spot uses a base of yucca, plantains, and corn chocked with flour dumplings; then serves it simply vegetarian or with beef, chicken, oxtail, or cow heel. Thanks to its natural gelatin, the hoof version is particularly viscous.

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