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Dishes from Thai restaurant, Changmai Diner.
A selection from Changmai Diner.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Best Restaurants Open on Monday in New York City

Thai diner fare, updated Cantonese classics, and a longtime favorite pub

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A selection from Changmai Diner.
| Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Monday is one of the best nights of the week for dining out. The chaotic Thursday-through-Sunday crowds have died down and grabbing a walk-in seat at popular restaurants is usually easier to swing, even at peak dining times. It’s an off day for a lot of restaurants — especially with industry-wide staffing shortages — but plenty of places keep their doors open for peers in the hospitality industry, who might have the day off, and regulars in the neighborhood looking for a bite to eat. Here are some of our favorites right now.

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Cafe Luxembourg

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There are no shortages of French brasseries in the city, but few restaurants can boast Cafe Luxembourg’s scene. On any given night, the dining room and bar are a gathering spot for longtime Upper West Side residents, New York Philharmonic performers, Broadway actors, and all sorts of creative types, from poets to architects. The menu offers reliable standards like strip steaks and pan-roasted salmon, but it’s the buzzy downtown energy (and dim lighting) in a room full of regulars that makes hanging out here feel like a night out.

Ruta Oaxaca

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When a meal on Monday calls for mole, Ruta Oaxaca checks that box and then some. The brightly colored Mexican restaurant in Astoria serves multiple varieties of mole blanketed over chicken and slow-cooked short ribs, as well as crispy fish tacos, chipotle-marinated shrimp with pineapple salsa, and baby-back ribs coated in a guava chipotle glaze. Eater critic Robert Sietsema found the restaurant to be excellent in a review.

A bowl of bright green ceviche packed with half-cut tomatoes and what appears to be pieces of shrimp and other seafood
Ceviche at Ruta Oaxaca.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

P.J. Clarke's

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Though it’s now expanded into a chain of pubs, the original P.J. Clarke’s has stood on Third Avenue since 1884. This is the one with the ancient mahogany bar, the old jukebox, and the taxidermied dog at the bar. Over the years it has attracted regulars like Jackie Kennedy and Frank Sinatra, and the bacon cheeseburger is called the “Cadillac” because that’s how Nat King Cole once described it.

An open-faced burger with lettuce, tomato, onion, and cheese next to a side of fries.
P.J. Clarke’s
Eater NY

Chi Restaurant & Bar

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From the duo behind Spy-C Village in Forest Hills, comes Chi, a very good Hell’s Kitchen Chinese restaurant. You might call it fancy, because of its sleek decor, elaborate cocktails, or a beef tendon and caviar dish that happens to have been inspired by Wylie Dufresne. Don’t miss the mushrooms with duck egg yolks.

Mushrooms on a plate.
Mushrooms with duck egg yolk at Chi.
Daniel Meyer/Eater NY

Don Don

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Don Don is a newer Korean barbecue spot in Manhattan. Chef Sungchul Shim, the owner of the Michelin-starred restaurants Mari and Kochi, opened just north of Bryant Park last fall. The business stays open until 11 p.m. on Monday nights with lots of ways to keep the party going. There’s soju and beer on the menu, shareable barbecue sets, and fun touches like a Korean-style lunch box.

Ci Siamo

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Chef Hillary Sterling, on the James Beard long list for best chef in New York, has turned this restaurant opposite Hudson Yards into a destination. Get the onion torta, any of the wood-fired vegetables (smashed potatoes, smoked carrots, Brussels sprouts), and the braised beans, followed by rapini agnolotti. For entrees, consider the whole trout, braised lamb, or bistecca.

The interior of the restaurant with tangerine bar seats, wood finishes, and light blue walls.
The interior of Ci Siamo.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Heritage Grand Bakery

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Located in the heart of Bryant Park, Heritage Grand Bakery focuses on varied grains and milling techniques. Look for dishes like branzino with pistachio chermoula or Tunisian chicken, as well as thin, tavern-style pizzas.

A spread from Heritage Bakery.
A spread from Heritage Grand Bakery.
Heritage Bakery.

Çka Ka Qëllu

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Critically praised Çka Ka Qëllu is an impressive display of Albanian food and culture that keeps expanding at a steady clip. The menu at the rustic, relatively new Murray Hill outpost, like its siblings in the Bronx and Connecticut, features platters of smoky grilled sausages, ground veal-stuffed dumplings, and slices of dense, crepe-like fli paired with a block of tangy feta.

A step down restaurant with a bright lit sign in red Albanian script.
Çka Ka Qëllu’s Murray Hill location.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Cafe Chelsea

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Café Chelsea is a French restaurant in the Hotel Chelsea that opened last year. It’s spread out over two rooms with chandeliers, tiled floors, and banquettes that might remind you of Balthazar. The menu has bistro staples — roast chicken, steak frites — and a few dishes that break the rules, like a “maitake au poivre” and ravioles du Dauphiné, a rectangular sheet of ravioli imported from Paris. The restaurant is open for daytime and nightly service.

A checkered floor and an oval bar.
Inside Cafe Chelsea.
Annie Schlechter/Café Chelsea

Chama Mama

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Georgian stalwart Chama Mama can get slammed on the weekends, but Monday diners are rewarded with shorter wait times and faster access to tangy pickled vegetables, plates of hefty, broth-filled khinkali, and the fan-favorite blistered cheese vessels known as adjaruli khachapuri.

An oblong bread with handles has a gooey fried egg in a lake of molten cheese.
Khachapuri from Chama Mama.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Lord’s

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One of Eater’s best new restaurants in America is open on Mondays. Lord’s comes from Patricia Howard and Ed Szymanski, the owners of Dame. Their second restaurant is serving the type of food that coursed its way through New York’s gastronomic zeitgeist more than a decade years ago — hay-smoked trout, pig head terrine, monkfish, sweetbreads.

A wide plate layered with black lentils, an orange egg yolk, and a skewer of mushrooms laid over top.
Lentils with egg and mushrooms at Lord’s.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Superiority Burger

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Industry workers with Mondays off can hit up vegetarian Superiority Burger, with its namesake dish and terrific desserts, provided they’re willing to line up for seats or give it a go later at night. Head to the back bar as you wait for generically named cocktails and homemade salty snacks that reside in an old-school gumball machine with a stack of paper cones on the side.

A hand holds a sandwich made from a slice of focaccia overflowing with collard greens.
The collard green sandwich at Superiority Burger.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Foul Witch

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The Roberta’s team opened this Italian restaurant and wine bar last year, where small plates like veal tortellini and linguini with sea urchin are served with a large list of wines by the glass. On Mondays, it’s possible to make a day-of reservation or walk right in.

Two plates, one with pasta the other with meat.
Goat garganelli and pork neck at Foul Witch.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Uncle Lou

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Uncle Lou debuted late in 2021 and has drawn crowds since, showcasing Cantonese homestyle cuisine with refined ingredients, including such dishes as homestyle Chenpi roast duck and beef sauteed with garlic chives. It’s open on Monday and usually draws a crowd.

Inside Uncle Lou, with a dragon, and people celebrating the new year.
Inside Uncle Lou.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Chiangmai Diner

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Though it doesn’t look like one, this restaurant calls itself a diner — with foods from all over Thailand. The curries, which come from several areas of the country, are the equivalent of a diner’s blue plate specials — perfect for solo meals, so rife with vegetables and herbs that you won’t need anything else. Don’t miss the kha soi with two kinds of noodles. This dish evolves as you eat it, and this version is thicker and richer than the ones you may have tasted before.

A dish of sausage from Changmai diner.
Sausage from Changmai Diner.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Rolo’s

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Rolo’s takes reservations, but it’s usually possible to walk in with a short wait on a Monday night. The restaurant is popular for its straightforward menu anchored by a wood-fired oven, which turns out polenta breads, charred head-on shrimp, and one of the borough’s best burgers.

The exterior of the new Ridgewood, Queens restaurant Rolo’s
Rolo’s in Ridgewood stays open on Mondays.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Place des Fêtes

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This French-sounding bar specializes in Spanish wines and seafood in a cozy subterranean Clinton Hill dining room from the Michelin-starred Oxalis team in Prospect Heights. Look for small plates from sardine toasts to fancy ham or a Castelfranco salad with hazelnuts. Wines by the glass start at around $15.

An overhead photograph of a fried skate wing and other dishes at Place des Fêtes, a wine bar in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn.
Fried skate wing and other dishes from Place des Fetes.
Chris Coe/Place des Fêtes

The Fly

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The Fly is run by the same owners as Hart’s and Cervo’s, both of which are also open on Mondays. The specialty here is affordable rotisserie chicken. There are rotisserie chicken sandwiches, whole and half birds, plus large sides like Caesar salads and french fries. The restaurant has seats at a bar and in a large back dining room, making it great for walk-ins.

A curved bar with dark-colored stools, hanging wine glasses, and bottles of liquor atop a wooden frame
The Fly stays open until 11 p.m. on Mondays.
Casey Kelbaugh/Eater NY

Red Hook Tavern

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Remember Red Hook Tavern? The five-year-old Red Hook restaurant still draws a crowd for its popular burger, now served with cottage fries instead of wedges. It stays open on Mondays with a portion of its dining room set aside for walk-ins.

Dry-aged burger with American cheese, onions, and wedge fries at Red Hook Tavern
Red Hook’s most famous burger is served on Mondays.
Jean Schwarzwalder/Eater NY

Cafe Luxembourg

There are no shortages of French brasseries in the city, but few restaurants can boast Cafe Luxembourg’s scene. On any given night, the dining room and bar are a gathering spot for longtime Upper West Side residents, New York Philharmonic performers, Broadway actors, and all sorts of creative types, from poets to architects. The menu offers reliable standards like strip steaks and pan-roasted salmon, but it’s the buzzy downtown energy (and dim lighting) in a room full of regulars that makes hanging out here feel like a night out.

Ruta Oaxaca

When a meal on Monday calls for mole, Ruta Oaxaca checks that box and then some. The brightly colored Mexican restaurant in Astoria serves multiple varieties of mole blanketed over chicken and slow-cooked short ribs, as well as crispy fish tacos, chipotle-marinated shrimp with pineapple salsa, and baby-back ribs coated in a guava chipotle glaze. Eater critic Robert Sietsema found the restaurant to be excellent in a review.

A bowl of bright green ceviche packed with half-cut tomatoes and what appears to be pieces of shrimp and other seafood
Ceviche at Ruta Oaxaca.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

P.J. Clarke's

Though it’s now expanded into a chain of pubs, the original P.J. Clarke’s has stood on Third Avenue since 1884. This is the one with the ancient mahogany bar, the old jukebox, and the taxidermied dog at the bar. Over the years it has attracted regulars like Jackie Kennedy and Frank Sinatra, and the bacon cheeseburger is called the “Cadillac” because that’s how Nat King Cole once described it.

An open-faced burger with lettuce, tomato, onion, and cheese next to a side of fries.
P.J. Clarke’s
Eater NY

Chi Restaurant & Bar

From the duo behind Spy-C Village in Forest Hills, comes Chi, a very good Hell’s Kitchen Chinese restaurant. You might call it fancy, because of its sleek decor, elaborate cocktails, or a beef tendon and caviar dish that happens to have been inspired by Wylie Dufresne. Don’t miss the mushrooms with duck egg yolks.

Mushrooms on a plate.
Mushrooms with duck egg yolk at Chi.
Daniel Meyer/Eater NY

Don Don

Don Don is a newer Korean barbecue spot in Manhattan. Chef Sungchul Shim, the owner of the Michelin-starred restaurants Mari and Kochi, opened just north of Bryant Park last fall. The business stays open until 11 p.m. on Monday nights with lots of ways to keep the party going. There’s soju and beer on the menu, shareable barbecue sets, and fun touches like a Korean-style lunch box.

Ci Siamo

Chef Hillary Sterling, on the James Beard long list for best chef in New York, has turned this restaurant opposite Hudson Yards into a destination. Get the onion torta, any of the wood-fired vegetables (smashed potatoes, smoked carrots, Brussels sprouts), and the braised beans, followed by rapini agnolotti. For entrees, consider the whole trout, braised lamb, or bistecca.

The interior of the restaurant with tangerine bar seats, wood finishes, and light blue walls.
The interior of Ci Siamo.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Heritage Grand Bakery

Located in the heart of Bryant Park, Heritage Grand Bakery focuses on varied grains and milling techniques. Look for dishes like branzino with pistachio chermoula or Tunisian chicken, as well as thin, tavern-style pizzas.

A spread from Heritage Bakery.
A spread from Heritage Grand Bakery.
Heritage Bakery.

Çka Ka Qëllu

Critically praised Çka Ka Qëllu is an impressive display of Albanian food and culture that keeps expanding at a steady clip. The menu at the rustic, relatively new Murray Hill outpost, like its siblings in the Bronx and Connecticut, features platters of smoky grilled sausages, ground veal-stuffed dumplings, and slices of dense, crepe-like fli paired with a block of tangy feta.

A step down restaurant with a bright lit sign in red Albanian script.
Çka Ka Qëllu’s Murray Hill location.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Cafe Chelsea

Café Chelsea is a French restaurant in the Hotel Chelsea that opened last year. It’s spread out over two rooms with chandeliers, tiled floors, and banquettes that might remind you of Balthazar. The menu has bistro staples — roast chicken, steak frites — and a few dishes that break the rules, like a “maitake au poivre” and ravioles du Dauphiné, a rectangular sheet of ravioli imported from Paris. The restaurant is open for daytime and nightly service.

A checkered floor and an oval bar.
Inside Cafe Chelsea.
Annie Schlechter/Café Chelsea

Chama Mama

Georgian stalwart Chama Mama can get slammed on the weekends, but Monday diners are rewarded with shorter wait times and faster access to tangy pickled vegetables, plates of hefty, broth-filled khinkali, and the fan-favorite blistered cheese vessels known as adjaruli khachapuri.

An oblong bread with handles has a gooey fried egg in a lake of molten cheese.
Khachapuri from Chama Mama.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Lord’s

One of Eater’s best new restaurants in America is open on Mondays. Lord’s comes from Patricia Howard and Ed Szymanski, the owners of Dame. Their second restaurant is serving the type of food that coursed its way through New York’s gastronomic zeitgeist more than a decade years ago — hay-smoked trout, pig head terrine, monkfish, sweetbreads.

A wide plate layered with black lentils, an orange egg yolk, and a skewer of mushrooms laid over top.
Lentils with egg and mushrooms at Lord’s.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Superiority Burger

Industry workers with Mondays off can hit up vegetarian Superiority Burger, with its namesake dish and terrific desserts, provided they’re willing to line up for seats or give it a go later at night. Head to the back bar as you wait for generically named cocktails and homemade salty snacks that reside in an old-school gumball machine with a stack of paper cones on the side.

A hand holds a sandwich made from a slice of focaccia overflowing with collard greens.
The collard green sandwich at Superiority Burger.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Foul Witch

The Roberta’s team opened this Italian restaurant and wine bar last year, where small plates like veal tortellini and linguini with sea urchin are served with a large list of wines by the glass. On Mondays, it’s possible to make a day-of reservation or walk right in.

Two plates, one with pasta the other with meat.
Goat garganelli and pork neck at Foul Witch.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Uncle Lou

Uncle Lou debuted late in 2021 and has drawn crowds since, showcasing Cantonese homestyle cuisine with refined ingredients, including such dishes as homestyle Chenpi roast duck and beef sauteed with garlic chives. It’s open on Monday and usually draws a crowd.

Inside Uncle Lou, with a dragon, and people celebrating the new year.
Inside Uncle Lou.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Chiangmai Diner

Though it doesn’t look like one, this restaurant calls itself a diner — with foods from all over Thailand. The curries, which come from several areas of the country, are the equivalent of a diner’s blue plate specials — perfect for solo meals, so rife with vegetables and herbs that you won’t need anything else. Don’t miss the kha soi with two kinds of noodles. This dish evolves as you eat it, and this version is thicker and richer than the ones you may have tasted before.

A dish of sausage from Changmai diner.
Sausage from Changmai Diner.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Related Maps

Rolo’s

Rolo’s takes reservations, but it’s usually possible to walk in with a short wait on a Monday night. The restaurant is popular for its straightforward menu anchored by a wood-fired oven, which turns out polenta breads, charred head-on shrimp, and one of the borough’s best burgers.

The exterior of the new Ridgewood, Queens restaurant Rolo’s
Rolo’s in Ridgewood stays open on Mondays.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Place des Fêtes

This French-sounding bar specializes in Spanish wines and seafood in a cozy subterranean Clinton Hill dining room from the Michelin-starred Oxalis team in Prospect Heights. Look for small plates from sardine toasts to fancy ham or a Castelfranco salad with hazelnuts. Wines by the glass start at around $15.

An overhead photograph of a fried skate wing and other dishes at Place des Fêtes, a wine bar in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn.
Fried skate wing and other dishes from Place des Fetes.
Chris Coe/Place des Fêtes

The Fly

The Fly is run by the same owners as Hart’s and Cervo’s, both of which are also open on Mondays. The specialty here is affordable rotisserie chicken. There are rotisserie chicken sandwiches, whole and half birds, plus large sides like Caesar salads and french fries. The restaurant has seats at a bar and in a large back dining room, making it great for walk-ins.

A curved bar with dark-colored stools, hanging wine glasses, and bottles of liquor atop a wooden frame
The Fly stays open until 11 p.m. on Mondays.
Casey Kelbaugh/Eater NY

Red Hook Tavern

Remember Red Hook Tavern? The five-year-old Red Hook restaurant still draws a crowd for its popular burger, now served with cottage fries instead of wedges. It stays open on Mondays with a portion of its dining room set aside for walk-ins.

Dry-aged burger with American cheese, onions, and wedge fries at Red Hook Tavern
Red Hook’s most famous burger is served on Mondays.
Jean Schwarzwalder/Eater NY

Related Maps