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A bowl of fried crab interspersed with red peppers and a small plate of fried soft shell crab off to the left side.
Red Lantern soft shell crab from Hutong.
Tanya Blum/Hutong

21 Excellent Midtown East Restaurants and Bars to Try

Fine dining, fast-casual, and just a great pub burger are all available in the neighborhood

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Red Lantern soft shell crab from Hutong.
| Tanya Blum/Hutong

For many, the eastern stretches of Midtown were a place to commute to for work, or for the occasional business lunch or breakfast; it’s not known for being much of a culinary destination. But a strong roster of dining options do indeed exist in Midtown East, and have managed to survive despite the lack of office crowds over the past 18 months. There are historical gems, like Le Grenouille’s celebrated haute French fare and the Grand Central Oyster Bar & Restaurant, which is finally reopening in September. Some of the city’s iconic steakhouses and burger joints exist here, too, as do excellent options for ramen and Sichuan dishes. Ahead, 21 places well worth a meal in the neighborhood north and east of Grand Central.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; the latest data about the delta variant indicates that it may pose a low-to-moderate risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Hutong New York

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731 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 758-4800
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Midtown’s Hutong is distinct from many of the dim sum parlors that populate Chinatown and Sunset Park. For one, this Hong Kong-based chain is serving an impressive variety of dishes from Sichuan, Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangdong, each with a modern twist. The yu xiang crispy pork mochi dumplings, for example, are dyed jet black, and Eater senior critic Robert Sietsema heartily recommends the roast Peking duck, served in half or whole portions. The Art Deco space is grand and quiet, with a glamorous walk-through wine cellar that the restaurant has nicknamed its “champagne runway.”

Three black oblong dumplings arranged on a golden ridged platter sitting on a black plate on a white background.
Yu xiang crispy pork mochi dumplings.
Tanya Blum/Hutong

2. Aquavit

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Read Review |
65 E 55th St
New York, NY 10022
(212) 307-7311
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One of New York City’s most esteemed Scandinavian restaurants has been hustling nonstop to stay open throughout the pandemic, offering lunch deals, picnic spreads, and holiday to-go kits to reach customers no matter where they are eating. The focus at this two-Michelin-starred spot is on local and sustainable ingredients, but chef Emma Bengtsson’s Arctic Bird’s Nest — a stunningly realistic-looking creation incorporating a honey nest, chocolate twigs, freeze-dried raspberries, brownie dirt, and shredded halvah — is worth the trip on its own. Though it’s possible to splurge with the $275 chef’s tasting, several price points are available, including a $155 prix fixe and an a la carte bar menu. (Note: The restaurant’s dining room is closed for a break until September 6. In the meantime, summery crayfish kits are available for takeout on the weekend.)

A colorful dessert of brownie dirt, raspberries and blueberries, shredded halvah, chocolate twigs, and a honey nest scattered on a white table
Aquavit’s Arctic Bird’s Nest dessert.
Signe Birck/Aquavit

3. Land of Plenty

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204 E 58th St
New York, NY 10022
(212) 308-8788
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Excellent, sufficiently numbing and tingly tasting Sichuan food is the draw here. Highlights include Madame Song’s seafood noodles, poached rabbit, and crispy tofu with roast chile and cumin. It’s all served in a white-washed space that’s polished and trendy.

Diners eating and talking at tables with white tablecloths in a white-walled room at Land of Plenty
Diners at Land of Plenty.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

4. Chola

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232 E 58th St
New York, NY 10022
(212) 688-4619
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Chola has been serving the Midtown East neighborhood for over 20 years, sending out affordable to-go lunches for office workers and nightly feasts of coastal Indian fare. Expect a sprawling, pan-regional menu of meat dishes, vegetarian fare, and vegan items, but notable seafood dishes include crab poriyal, Mumbai fish fry, prawns koliwada, too many shrimp dishes to list, and lobster malaikari. To-go lunch boxes are available for between $15 and $18.

5. La Grenouille

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3 E 52nd St
New York, NY 10022
(212) 752-1495
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A truly iconic stalwart of French haute cuisine, La Grenouille is Manhattan’s last remaining place to sample the fanciest of midcentury Gallic fare. It opened in 1962, and has been serving dover sole, whitefish quenelles, lobster raviolis, and the laborious classical French ilk ever since.

A white plate with a hand spooning sauce on it, next to fish, green beans, and a half lemon placed on the dish.
Dover sole at La Grenouille.
Bill Addison/Eater

6. Casa Lever

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390 Park Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 888-2700
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This polished Italian place occupies the former Lever House, a power lunch den, inside the iconic midcentury modern Lever House building, built in 1951. It’s run by the same team as Sant Ambroeus, and both places serve chic Milanese fare. The menu is fancier at Casa Lever than Sant Ambroeus, and the walls here bear artwork by Damien Hirst for a particularly posh environment to eat bolognese, crudo, and vitello tonnato. On a nice day, have a leisurely lunch in the garden space.

7. P.J. Clarke's

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915 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 317-1616
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The original outpost of the reliable bar with a signature, standout burger is housed in Midtown East. It’s one of the city’s finest patties; in fact, the cheeseburger at P.J. Clarke’s was once dubbed the “Cadillac of burgers” by Nat King Cole circa the 1950s.

A picture-perfect burger, topped with lettuce, tomato, and bacon on a bun, sits on a plate next to french fries.
A picture-perfect burger from P.J. Clarke’s.
Nick Solares/Eater NY

8. Le Relais de Venise L'Entrecôte

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590 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 758-3989
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Few New York restaurants have a menu as simple as that of Le Relais de Venise: Dinner consists of a walnut-topped salad in a mustard vinaigrette followed by a sliced steak frites with green sauce and fries for $32. Desserts are between $9 to $10.50 extra and include a choice of profiteroles, fromage blanc, sticky toffee pudding, ice creams, and other selections.

9. Urbanspace at 570 Lex

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General Electric Building, 570 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022
(917) 388-9564
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Food hall brand Urbanspace’s location on Lexington has several good stall options. Stop by for a quick meal of Italian heroes from Cappone’s, a cappuccino and an egg sandwich from Little Collins, or a selection of bao from Bao by Kaya. For those rushing through, the food hall recently debuted a slick new takeout and delivery system that makes it easy to order from multiple stalls at once.

In the center of the photo, two people talk as they walk up the stairs of a two-level shopping mall. On the lower level, people move about.
The entrance to Urbanspace.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

10. Totto Ramen Midtown East

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248 E 52nd St
New York, NY 10022
(212) 421-0052
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This beloved Midtown West ramen joint expanded east in 2014, serving its signature chicken broth-based bowls. The building is a veritable slice of ramen-slurping paradise; above the east side outpost of Totto lies Hide-Chan Ramen. But it’s not a competition between two noodle-slinging spots. They’re actually both owned by the same man, Bobby Munekata. Both Totto Ramen and Hide-Chan serve up Sun Noodles, cooked al dente; Hide-Chan instead specializes in tonkotsu (pork bone-based) broth.

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11. Socarrat Paella Bar

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953 2nd Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 759-0101
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Head here for excellent Spanish fare at this offshoot of the popular Chelsea paella and tapas joint, which opened its Midtown East location in 2011 and has a Nolita outpost, too. In addition to its namesake dish of flavor-packed, pan-seared rice, this location serves up a variety of tapas and Spanish ham and cheese boards. It’s also got a snug patio space. On weekdays, happy hour is offered on the restaurant’s first floor from 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., and brunch is served on Saturdays and Sundays.

A large black handled bowl filled with rice, shrimp, mussels and vegetables.
One of Socarrat’s many paellas.
Socarrat Paella Bar

12. Smith & Wollensky

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797 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 753-1530
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The iconic carnivore’s haunt, with its distinctive, impossible-to-miss green and white facade, is one of the city’s most consistent steakhouses. It’s been around since 1977, serving up great dry-aged cuts and a spiced Cajun ribeye. Though it’s expanded into a chain over the years, it’s still a quality choice for a great steak. The prime rib is also a stand-out.

Medium rare prime rib on a white plate with creamed spinach in the background.
Smith & Wollensky’s prime rib.
Nick Solares/Eater NY

13. La Pecora Bianca

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950 2nd Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 899-9996
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This breezy Italian spot on Second Avenue is in a beautifully designed space that feels decidedly more stylish than most dining options in the area. The pretty, pastel and white-filled digs are similar to the restaurant’s Nomad outpost. Head here for a plate of pasta and Aperol spritz.

14. Ophelia Lounge NYC

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3 Mitchell Pl 26th floor
New York, NY 10017
(212) 980-4796
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Excellent views, accompanied by fancy cocktails, are the main attractions at this swishy cocktail lounge, located in a space with rich history. Perched on the 26th floor of the Beekman Tower, the rooftop bar has sweeping views of the East River, with outside space as well as an enclosed patio area. Drinks like the Ophelia’s Ascension (bourbon and Jamaican pepper-infused mezcal) are accompanied by snacks like steak tartare or hamachi crudo. The digs were once frequented by Frank Sinatra, and, before that, served as a residence for young professional women formerly in sororities circa the 1920s, as evidenced by some historical ephemera encased in the bar’s surface. There are all sorts of eclectic antiques — such as stuffed peacocks — filling the high-ceilinged, navy-walled space with red banquettes, checkerboard floors, and massive windows.

15. Aburiya Kinnosuke

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213 E 45th St
New York, NY 10017
(212) 867-5454
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This Japanese robata grill, set in an intimate, dark-wooded space, offers an array of proteins to choose from, including chicken and pork belly. There’s also a smaller range of seafood, offered raw in a sashimi assortment, or grilled, including miso black cod and mackerel. Sides to round out a carnivorous feast (or surf-and-turf, depending on the order) here include edamame and stir-fried vegetables.

16. Grand Central Oyster Bar

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89 E 42nd St
New York, NY 10017
(212) 490-6650
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The iconic seafood destination, which first opened in 1913 and is now re-opening on September 20 after a pandemic hiatus, is nestled under soaring, beautifully arched and tiled ceilings in a subterranean space inside Grand Central Terminal. The environs, complete with massive U-shaped counter seating perfect for dining solo, are so special that the restaurant nabbed the Design Icon Award at at the James Beard Awards in 2017. In addition to ordering up a platter of raw bivalves, don’t miss the epic oyster pan roast. All of the seafood goes down smoothly with a stiff martini.

A long underground bar with backed bar stools is set up under an arching tunneled ceiling with yellow glowing lights. Grand Central Oyster Bar

17. Overlook

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225 E 44th St
New York, NY 10017
(212) 682-7266
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Overlook — a sports bar often populated by Chicago Bears, Cubs, or Islanders fans when a game is on — serves a particularly great burger, plus tasty wings. The pleasantly divey space is covered with a surprising treasure trove of cartoons on a huge wall, and the place was dubbed “the Sistine Chapel of cartooning” by The New York Times. Check the website for a rotating cast of food and drink specials on weeknights.

18. Sakagura

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211 E 43rd St, B1
New York, NY 10017
(212) 953-7253
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Tucked in a cool subterranean space below a Midtown office building, Sakagura serves up Japanese small plates, along with over 200 sakes. It’s been around since 1996, and touts itself a pioneer of sake selection and education in NYC, with events and tastings regularly offered. Currently, Sakagura features an $85 prix-fixe — which might include hirame carpaccio, roasted washugyu beef, or salmon-kabocha gratin — as well as a limited a la carte menu.

19. Sushi Yasuda

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204 E 43rd St
New York, NY 10017
(212) 972-1001
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This celebrated sushi spot is one of the city’s finest. Chef Naomichi Yasuda opened the place in 1999 and was known for creating a detail-oriented, quite traditional, and personalized sushi experience; he left in 2011, but his namesake restaurant has maintained the same level of quality since and, in fact, it now boasts a Michelin star.

20. Tempura Matsui

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222 E 39th St
New York, NY 10016
(212) 986-8885
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The sedate Matsui in Murray Hill remains the city’s only Michelin-starred tempura spot. Accordingly, dinner is quite expensive at $160 or $220 for the omakase-only offerings of delicately fried fish, shellfish, fungi, and vegetables — along with sashimi and chawanmushi. Lunch, however, offers a lower starting price at $55, with both salmon roe ($18) and sea urchin ($25) options available.

Tempura Matsui’s rining room has booths in the back and a bar up front Nick Solares/Eater

21. Pio Pio

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210 E 34th St
New York, NY 10016
(212) 481-0034
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The Pio Pio chain is one of the city’s most reliable spots for solid, affordable rotisserie chicken and assorted Peruvian fare. Key menu items include the spicy ceviche, empanadas de pollo, lomo saltado (filet mignon sauteed with soy sauce), arroz chaufa (Peruvian-style Chinese fried rice), and of course the succulent and tender chicken, paired with fries and a garlicky green sauce.

1. Hutong New York

731 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10022
Three black oblong dumplings arranged on a golden ridged platter sitting on a black plate on a white background.
Yu xiang crispy pork mochi dumplings.
Tanya Blum/Hutong

Midtown’s Hutong is distinct from many of the dim sum parlors that populate Chinatown and Sunset Park. For one, this Hong Kong-based chain is serving an impressive variety of dishes from Sichuan, Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangdong, each with a modern twist. The yu xiang crispy pork mochi dumplings, for example, are dyed jet black, and Eater senior critic Robert Sietsema heartily recommends the roast Peking duck, served in half or whole portions. The Art Deco space is grand and quiet, with a glamorous walk-through wine cellar that the restaurant has nicknamed its “champagne runway.”

731 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022

2. Aquavit

65 E 55th St, New York, NY 10022
Read Review |
A colorful dessert of brownie dirt, raspberries and blueberries, shredded halvah, chocolate twigs, and a honey nest scattered on a white table
Aquavit’s Arctic Bird’s Nest dessert.
Signe Birck/Aquavit

One of New York City’s most esteemed Scandinavian restaurants has been hustling nonstop to stay open throughout the pandemic, offering lunch deals, picnic spreads, and holiday to-go kits to reach customers no matter where they are eating. The focus at this two-Michelin-starred spot is on local and sustainable ingredients, but chef Emma Bengtsson’s Arctic Bird’s Nest — a stunningly realistic-looking creation incorporating a honey nest, chocolate twigs, freeze-dried raspberries, brownie dirt, and shredded halvah — is worth the trip on its own. Though it’s possible to splurge with the $275 chef’s tasting, several price points are available, including a $155 prix fixe and an a la carte bar menu. (Note: The restaurant’s dining room is closed for a break until September 6. In the meantime, summery crayfish kits are available for takeout on the weekend.)

65 E 55th St
New York, NY 10022

3. Land of Plenty

204 E 58th St, New York, NY 10022
Diners eating and talking at tables with white tablecloths in a white-walled room at Land of Plenty
Diners at Land of Plenty.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Excellent, sufficiently numbing and tingly tasting Sichuan food is the draw here. Highlights include Madame Song’s seafood noodles, poached rabbit, and crispy tofu with roast chile and cumin. It’s all served in a white-washed space that’s polished and trendy.

204 E 58th St
New York, NY 10022

4. Chola

232 E 58th St, New York, NY 10022

Chola has been serving the Midtown East neighborhood for over 20 years, sending out affordable to-go lunches for office workers and nightly feasts of coastal Indian fare. Expect a sprawling, pan-regional menu of meat dishes, vegetarian fare, and vegan items, but notable seafood dishes include crab poriyal, Mumbai fish fry, prawns koliwada, too many shrimp dishes to list, and lobster malaikari. To-go lunch boxes are available for between $15 and $18.

232 E 58th St
New York, NY 10022

5. La Grenouille

3 E 52nd St, New York, NY 10022
A white plate with a hand spooning sauce on it, next to fish, green beans, and a half lemon placed on the dish.
Dover sole at La Grenouille.
Bill Addison/Eater

A truly iconic stalwart of French haute cuisine, La Grenouille is Manhattan’s last remaining place to sample the fanciest of midcentury Gallic fare. It opened in 1962, and has been serving dover sole, whitefish quenelles, lobster raviolis, and the laborious classical French ilk ever since.

3 E 52nd St
New York, NY 10022

6. Casa Lever

390 Park Ave, New York, NY 10022

This polished Italian place occupies the former Lever House, a power lunch den, inside the iconic midcentury modern Lever House building, built in 1951. It’s run by the same team as Sant Ambroeus, and both places serve chic Milanese fare. The menu is fancier at Casa Lever than Sant Ambroeus, and the walls here bear artwork by Damien Hirst for a particularly posh environment to eat bolognese, crudo, and vitello tonnato. On a nice day, have a leisurely lunch in the garden space.

390 Park Ave
New York, NY 10022

7. P.J. Clarke's

915 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10022
A picture-perfect burger, topped with lettuce, tomato, and bacon on a bun, sits on a plate next to french fries.
A picture-perfect burger from P.J. Clarke’s.
Nick Solares/Eater NY

The original outpost of the reliable bar with a signature, standout burger is housed in Midtown East. It’s one of the city’s finest patties; in fact, the cheeseburger at P.J. Clarke’s was once dubbed the “Cadillac of burgers” by Nat King Cole circa the 1950s.

915 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10022

8. Le Relais de Venise L'Entrecôte

590 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10022

Few New York restaurants have a menu as simple as that of Le Relais de Venise: Dinner consists of a walnut-topped salad in a mustard vinaigrette followed by a sliced steak frites with green sauce and fries for $32. Desserts are between $9 to $10.50 extra and include a choice of profiteroles, fromage blanc, sticky toffee pudding, ice creams, and other selections.

590 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022

9. Urbanspace at 570 Lex

General Electric Building, 570 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10022
In the center of the photo, two people talk as they walk up the stairs of a two-level shopping mall. On the lower level, people move about.
The entrance to Urbanspace.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Food hall brand Urbanspace’s location on Lexington has several good stall options. Stop by for a quick meal of Italian heroes from Cappone’s, a cappuccino and an egg sandwich from Little Collins, or a selection of bao from Bao by Kaya. For those rushing through, the food hall recently debuted a slick new takeout and delivery system that makes it easy to order from multiple stalls at once.

General Electric Building, 570 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022

10. Totto Ramen Midtown East

248 E 52nd St, New York, NY 10022

This beloved Midtown West ramen joint expanded east in 2014, serving its signature chicken broth-based bowls. The building is a veritable slice of ramen-slurping paradise; above the east side outpost of Totto lies Hide-Chan Ramen. But it’s not a competition between two noodle-slinging spots. They’re actually both owned by the same man, Bobby Munekata. Both Totto Ramen and Hide-Chan serve up Sun Noodles, cooked al dente; Hide-Chan instead specializes in tonkotsu (pork bone-based) broth.

248 E 52nd St
New York, NY 10022

11. Socarrat Paella Bar

953 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10022
A large black handled bowl filled with rice, shrimp, mussels and vegetables.
One of Socarrat’s many paellas.
Socarrat Paella Bar

Head here for excellent Spanish fare at this offshoot of the popular Chelsea paella and tapas joint, which opened its Midtown East location in 2011 and has a Nolita outpost, too. In addition to its namesake dish of flavor-packed, pan-seared rice, this location serves up a variety of tapas and Spanish ham and cheese boards. It’s also got a snug patio space. On weekdays, happy hour is offered on the restaurant’s first floor from 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., and brunch is served on Saturdays and Sundays.

953 2nd Ave
New York, NY 10022

12. Smith & Wollensky

797 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10022
Medium rare prime rib on a white plate with creamed spinach in the background.
Smith & Wollensky’s prime rib.
Nick Solares/Eater NY

The iconic carnivore’s haunt, with its distinctive, impossible-to-miss green and white facade, is one of the city’s most consistent steakhouses. It’s been around since 1977, serving up great dry-aged cuts and a spiced Cajun ribeye. Though it’s expanded into a chain over the years, it’s still a quality choice for a great steak. The prime rib is also a stand-out.

797 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10022

13. La Pecora Bianca

950 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10022

This breezy Italian spot on Second Avenue is in a beautifully designed space that feels decidedly more stylish than most dining options in the area. The pretty, pastel and white-filled digs are similar to the restaurant’s Nomad outpost. Head here for a plate of pasta and Aperol spritz.

950 2nd Ave
New York, NY 10022

14. Ophelia Lounge NYC

3 Mitchell Pl 26th floor, New York, NY 10017

Excellent views, accompanied by fancy cocktails, are the main attractions at this swishy cocktail lounge, located in a space with rich history. Perched on the 26th floor of the Beekman Tower, the rooftop bar has sweeping views of the East River, with outside space as well as an enclosed patio area. Drinks like the Ophelia’s Ascension (bourbon and Jamaican pepper-infused mezcal) are accompanied by snacks like steak tartare or hamachi crudo. The digs were once frequented by Frank Sinatra, and, before that, served as a residence for young professional women formerly in sororities circa the 1920s, as evidenced by some historical ephemera encased in the bar’s surface. There are all sorts of eclectic antiques — such as stuffed peacocks — filling the high-ceilinged, navy-walled space with red banquettes, checkerboard floors, and massive windows.

3 Mitchell Pl 26th floor
New York, NY 10017

15. Aburiya Kinnosuke

213 E 45th St, New York, NY 10017

This Japanese robata grill, set in an intimate, dark-wooded space, offers an array of proteins to choose from, including chicken and pork belly. There’s also a smaller range of seafood, offered raw in a sashimi assortment, or grilled, including miso black cod and mackerel. Sides to round out a carnivorous feast (or surf-and-turf, depending on the order) here include edamame and stir-fried vegetables.

213 E 45th St
New York, NY 10017

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16. Grand Central Oyster Bar

89 E 42nd St, New York, NY 10017
A long underground bar with backed bar stools is set up under an arching tunneled ceiling with yellow glowing lights. Grand Central Oyster Bar

The iconic seafood destination, which first opened in 1913 and is now re-opening on September 20 after a pandemic hiatus, is nestled under soaring, beautifully arched and tiled ceilings in a subterranean space inside Grand Central Terminal. The environs, complete with massive U-shaped counter seating perfect for dining solo, are so special that the restaurant nabbed the Design Icon Award at at the James Beard Awards in 2017. In addition to ordering up a platter of raw bivalves, don’t miss the epic oyster pan roast. All of the seafood goes down smoothly with a stiff martini.

89 E 42nd St
New York, NY 10017

17. Overlook

225 E 44th St, New York, NY 10017

Overlook — a sports bar often populated by Chicago Bears, Cubs, or Islanders fans when a game is on — serves a particularly great burger, plus tasty wings. The pleasantly divey space is covered with a surprising treasure trove of cartoons on a huge wall, and the place was dubbed “the Sistine Chapel of cartooning” by The New York Times. Check the website for a rotating cast of food and drink specials on weeknights.

225 E 44th St
New York, NY 10017

18. Sakagura

211 E 43rd St, B1, New York, NY 10017

Tucked in a cool subterranean space below a Midtown office building, Sakagura serves up Japanese small plates, along with over 200 sakes. It’s been around since 1996, and touts itself a pioneer of sake selection and education in NYC, with events and tastings regularly offered. Currently, Sakagura features an $85 prix-fixe — which might include hirame carpaccio, roasted washugyu beef, or salmon-kabocha gratin — as well as a limited a la carte menu.

211 E 43rd St, B1
New York, NY 10017

19. Sushi Yasuda

204 E 43rd St, New York, NY 10017

This celebrated sushi spot is one of the city’s finest. Chef Naomichi Yasuda opened the place in 1999 and was known for creating a detail-oriented, quite traditional, and personalized sushi experience; he left in 2011, but his namesake restaurant has maintained the same level of quality since and, in fact, it now boasts a Michelin star.

204 E 43rd St
New York, NY 10017

20. Tempura Matsui

222 E 39th St, New York, NY 10016
Tempura Matsui’s rining room has booths in the back and a bar up front Nick Solares/Eater

The sedate Matsui in Murray Hill remains the city’s only Michelin-starred tempura spot. Accordingly, dinner is quite expensive at $160 or $220 for the omakase-only offerings of delicately fried fish, shellfish, fungi, and vegetables — along with sashimi and chawanmushi. Lunch, however, offers a lower starting price at $55, with both salmon roe ($18) and sea urchin ($25) options available.

222 E 39th St
New York, NY 10016

21. Pio Pio

210 E 34th St, New York, NY 10016

The Pio Pio chain is one of the city’s most reliable spots for solid, affordable rotisserie chicken and assorted Peruvian fare. Key menu items include the spicy ceviche, empanadas de pollo, lomo saltado (filet mignon sauteed with soy sauce), arroz chaufa (Peruvian-style Chinese fried rice), and of course the succulent and tender chicken, paired with fries and a garlicky green sauce.

210 E 34th St
New York, NY 10016

Related Maps