clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
A restaurant storefront with red awning on a street corner with a traffic light.
Vezzo, a popular pizza destination in Kips Bay.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

9 Spots Worthy of a Trip to Kips Bay

Neighborhood mainstays and newer spots offer everything from vegan Indian fare to thin-crust pizza

View as Map
Vezzo, a popular pizza destination in Kips Bay.
| Bao Ong/Eater NY

Kips Bay doesn’t exactly rank high as a dining-out destination, especially when it’s surrounded by classic and trendy restaurant neighborhoods like Gramercy, Koreatown, Nomad, and Union Square. But while the neighborhood may not be as dynamic on the culinary front, there are gems to be found. A stretch of Lexington Avenue dubbed “Curry Hill” includes one of the NYC’s most well-known vegetarian Indian restaurants. There’s a charming Greek-owned bakery, open since 1935, selling everything from birthday cakes to baklava. Newer spots, like brunch favorite Rosemary’s, are also opening in this quickly changing neighborhood, which may be vague in its boundaries but is certainly worth visiting for its under-the-radar restaurants.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

2nd Ave Deli

Copy Link

The kosher deli is an increasingly rare type of New York establishment these days. Since it opened more than half a century ago in the East Village, however, 2nd Ave Deli continues to be a mainstay with locations in Kips Bay and another on the Upper East Side. New Yorkers and tourists alike stop by for its hearty chicken soup and sandwiches overstuffed with deli meats, silky chopped liver, and other Jewish appetizing favorites.

It’s no secret that New York City is home to some of the world’s best pizza, with almost any imaginable permutation of the pie for sale: New York-style, Detroit-style, deep dish, and grandma slices are just a few. At Vezzo, the pies set themselves apart with a cracker-thin crust and simple toppings — classic cheese or pepperoni — and it’s easy for one person to finish off a 16-inch pizza without sharing.

Rose Bakery

Copy Link

There’s often a line out the door at Dover Street Market, where a security guard lets in people waiting to spend hundreds of dollars on designer clothes. But those in the know can bypass the crowds and head straight for Rose Bakery, tucked into the first floor of this fashionista destination. The cafeteria-like space features several communal tables and is a quiet spot for a quick lunch or afternoon coffee. The menu changes regularly but the daily roster of seasonal dishes often includes a soup (made with roasted cauliflower, most recently) or plate of tinned fish paired with toasted sourdough and olives. The desserts, from slices of carrot-cranberry pie to ginger molasses cookies, are popular here.

a loaf of blackberry tea cake with lime buttercream
Blackberry tea cake with lime buttercream at Rose Bakery.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

Penelope

Copy Link

Penelope is by far the most in-demand brunch destination in Kips Bay. Stacked blueberry pancakes, generous burgers with thick patties, and home fries served with any variety of eggs are some of the hit dishes here. The food isn’t revolutionary by any means, but the spot has been around for over a decade (despite a brief closure before the pandemic) and its farmhouse design doesn’t feel like a run-of-the-mill all-day cafe selling avocado toast.

Turkish Kitchen

Copy Link

Turkish Kitchen pulls from a variety of influences from a country that sits between Western Asia and Europe. The menu nods to Persian and Central Asian to Jewish and Greek traditions in dishes like sigara boregi (pan-fried rolls of phyllo that are brimming with feta cheese) and manti (gently boiled beef dumplings served with a garlicky yogurt sauce), perfect for washing down with some raki, the licorice-tasting spirit popular in the region. Locals also come here for the popular Sunday brunch buffet, which includes everything from French toast and croissants to cold mezze spreads and spinach pie.

Burp Bowl Cafe

Copy Link

This tiny noodle shop with four tables feels like dining in a chef’s restaurant kitchen with boxes of dried noodles and tubs of soy sauce lining the walls. It’s easy to gloss over a spot that looks like a neighborhood Chinese-American takeout joint at first glance, but the affordable prices and chile-fueled recipes make this a worthy destination. The lamb noodles, which Eater critic Robert Sietsema called top notch, is a must-try dish. A limited menu also includes wonton soup and other noodle dishes like the stellar spicy chicken with cold noodles.

A bowl with cold noodles, spicy chicken, and cucumbers topped with scallions and peanuts sits on a wooden table.
Cold noodles with spicy chicken at Burp Bowl.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

Saravanaa Bhavan

Copy Link

The bright, sparsely decorated room at Sarvanaa Bhavan is actually part of a large chain of vegetarians restaurants with over two dozen locations in India and close to 50 in other countries around the world. Fans of the restaurant know to order a dosa that can nearly take up an entire table. Each tissue paper-thin piece of pastry is filled with a range of aromatic fillings like spiced potatoes, grated cheddar cheese, or perfectly cooked lentils. The prices are gentle enough to try a new item on the expansive menu on multiple visits.

A metal tray with compartments containing a white vegetable curry and two red flatbreads.
White vegetable curry and flatbread at Saravanaa Bhavan.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

La Delice Pastry Shop

Copy Link

Stepping into La Delice Pastry Shop is like going back in time. The bakery has been open since 1935 and everything from the vintage sign to the tchotchkes, including an eerily realistic statue of a chef out front, adds to the charm of this spot. It also feels like walking into a candy store with a dizzying array of sweets — over 35 different flavors of butter cookies, danishes, countless cookies, cupcakes, and cakes for all sorts of occasions.

A glass case filled with pastries, including many kids of cookies at La Delice Pastry Shop.
There are countless pastries at La Delice Pastry Shop.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

Rosemary's East

Copy Link

The original Rosemary’s in the West Village is still one of the most sought-after tables for its seasonal, Italian-leaning fare — think crispy Brussels sprouts with mostarda honey, cacio e pepe pastas, and kale celery Caesar salads. This east side location, where it’s usually easier to snag a table, is more expansive while still feeling like a neighborhood joint.

2nd Ave Deli

The kosher deli is an increasingly rare type of New York establishment these days. Since it opened more than half a century ago in the East Village, however, 2nd Ave Deli continues to be a mainstay with locations in Kips Bay and another on the Upper East Side. New Yorkers and tourists alike stop by for its hearty chicken soup and sandwiches overstuffed with deli meats, silky chopped liver, and other Jewish appetizing favorites.

Vezzo

It’s no secret that New York City is home to some of the world’s best pizza, with almost any imaginable permutation of the pie for sale: New York-style, Detroit-style, deep dish, and grandma slices are just a few. At Vezzo, the pies set themselves apart with a cracker-thin crust and simple toppings — classic cheese or pepperoni — and it’s easy for one person to finish off a 16-inch pizza without sharing.

Rose Bakery

a loaf of blackberry tea cake with lime buttercream
Blackberry tea cake with lime buttercream at Rose Bakery.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

There’s often a line out the door at Dover Street Market, where a security guard lets in people waiting to spend hundreds of dollars on designer clothes. But those in the know can bypass the crowds and head straight for Rose Bakery, tucked into the first floor of this fashionista destination. The cafeteria-like space features several communal tables and is a quiet spot for a quick lunch or afternoon coffee. The menu changes regularly but the daily roster of seasonal dishes often includes a soup (made with roasted cauliflower, most recently) or plate of tinned fish paired with toasted sourdough and olives. The desserts, from slices of carrot-cranberry pie to ginger molasses cookies, are popular here.

a loaf of blackberry tea cake with lime buttercream
Blackberry tea cake with lime buttercream at Rose Bakery.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

Penelope

Penelope is by far the most in-demand brunch destination in Kips Bay. Stacked blueberry pancakes, generous burgers with thick patties, and home fries served with any variety of eggs are some of the hit dishes here. The food isn’t revolutionary by any means, but the spot has been around for over a decade (despite a brief closure before the pandemic) and its farmhouse design doesn’t feel like a run-of-the-mill all-day cafe selling avocado toast.

Turkish Kitchen

Turkish Kitchen pulls from a variety of influences from a country that sits between Western Asia and Europe. The menu nods to Persian and Central Asian to Jewish and Greek traditions in dishes like sigara boregi (pan-fried rolls of phyllo that are brimming with feta cheese) and manti (gently boiled beef dumplings served with a garlicky yogurt sauce), perfect for washing down with some raki, the licorice-tasting spirit popular in the region. Locals also come here for the popular Sunday brunch buffet, which includes everything from French toast and croissants to cold mezze spreads and spinach pie.

Burp Bowl Cafe

A bowl with cold noodles, spicy chicken, and cucumbers topped with scallions and peanuts sits on a wooden table.
Cold noodles with spicy chicken at Burp Bowl.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

This tiny noodle shop with four tables feels like dining in a chef’s restaurant kitchen with boxes of dried noodles and tubs of soy sauce lining the walls. It’s easy to gloss over a spot that looks like a neighborhood Chinese-American takeout joint at first glance, but the affordable prices and chile-fueled recipes make this a worthy destination. The lamb noodles, which Eater critic Robert Sietsema called top notch, is a must-try dish. A limited menu also includes wonton soup and other noodle dishes like the stellar spicy chicken with cold noodles.

A bowl with cold noodles, spicy chicken, and cucumbers topped with scallions and peanuts sits on a wooden table.
Cold noodles with spicy chicken at Burp Bowl.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

Saravanaa Bhavan

A metal tray with compartments containing a white vegetable curry and two red flatbreads.
White vegetable curry and flatbread at Saravanaa Bhavan.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The bright, sparsely decorated room at Sarvanaa Bhavan is actually part of a large chain of vegetarians restaurants with over two dozen locations in India and close to 50 in other countries around the world. Fans of the restaurant know to order a dosa that can nearly take up an entire table. Each tissue paper-thin piece of pastry is filled with a range of aromatic fillings like spiced potatoes, grated cheddar cheese, or perfectly cooked lentils. The prices are gentle enough to try a new item on the expansive menu on multiple visits.

A metal tray with compartments containing a white vegetable curry and two red flatbreads.
White vegetable curry and flatbread at Saravanaa Bhavan.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

La Delice Pastry Shop

A glass case filled with pastries, including many kids of cookies at La Delice Pastry Shop.
There are countless pastries at La Delice Pastry Shop.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

Stepping into La Delice Pastry Shop is like going back in time. The bakery has been open since 1935 and everything from the vintage sign to the tchotchkes, including an eerily realistic statue of a chef out front, adds to the charm of this spot. It also feels like walking into a candy store with a dizzying array of sweets — over 35 different flavors of butter cookies, danishes, countless cookies, cupcakes, and cakes for all sorts of occasions.

A glass case filled with pastries, including many kids of cookies at La Delice Pastry Shop.
There are countless pastries at La Delice Pastry Shop.
Bao Ong/Eater NY

Rosemary's East

The original Rosemary’s in the West Village is still one of the most sought-after tables for its seasonal, Italian-leaning fare — think crispy Brussels sprouts with mostarda honey, cacio e pepe pastas, and kale celery Caesar salads. This east side location, where it’s usually easier to snag a table, is more expansive while still feeling like a neighborhood joint.

Related Maps