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Bits of glazed pork belly and cuttlefish swim in a dark brown sauce.
The pork belly with cuttlefish at Wenwen.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

The Best Restaurants in Greenpoint

From Wenwen to Bernie’s, here’s where to eat in this Brooklyn neighborhood right now

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The pork belly with cuttlefish at Wenwen.
| Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Once a heavily Polish enclave home to factories, film studios, and artists workshops, Brooklyn’s northernmost neighborhood has become a full-on culinary destination in recent years. Greenpoint has been quietly amassing some of the most compelling restaurants in the city — even if neighboring Williamsburg hogs the limelight. The diversity here is staggering, spanning everything from top-tier tacos to udon restaurants and bakeries unchanged for generations. Here are the best restaurants to try in Greenpoint right now.

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Eric Sze and Andy Chuang, the duo behind 886, a casual stir-fry shop in the East Village, continue to spread the gospel of Taiwan’s diverse foodways. Wenwen is the more elegant of the two restaurants but it shares the same boozy DNA as 886, especially with upscale riffs on Long Island ice tea highballs. Line up early when Wenwen opens for the BDSM chicken (the birds sell out quickly), or drop by later for numbing celtuce with Sichuan pepper, crispy fried tofu with garlic-soy paste, and youfan sticky rice with bacon and dried scallops.

Customers pick at dishes with red chopsticks at a crowded dining room table.
Wenwen is for adults, too.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Noma co-founder Mads Refslund has opened a destination-worthy restaurant if there ever were one, housed in a dramatic warehouse-turned-dining room with two tasting menus ($195, $295) and a la carte at the bar. Drink an elixir from a giant clam shell tied with a rope that comes off a rolling cart of iced shellfish, or snack on whelk or big-eyed tuna. Antelope, fluke, and Amish chicken have made appearances among main courses, as has porridge for dessert.

The inside of Ilis, with a bank of walk-ins in the dining room.
The dining room at Ilis.
Evan Sung/Ilis

Achilles Heel

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Achilles Heel is one of those places that strikes the right note any time of day: casual or date-ready, good for a full-blown meal or just drinks. This spot from restaurateur Andrew Tarlow (behind North Brooklyn heavy-hitters like Diner), was transformed by chef Sunny Lee — known for her Banchan by Sunny pop-ups — last year. Under her direction, the restaurant feels entirely new, most have a Korean spin, with lots of rotating vegetables. During the winter, Achilles Heel has a fireplace for warming up.

Radio Bakery

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This newish bakery owned by the team behind Rolo’s is led by Kelly Mencin. The online menu lists an array of croissants —vanilla citrus, maple breakfast sausage — corn cakes, cookies, and pan loafs. And if you’re looking for more of a meal, there’s breakfast and lunch sandwiches and focaccia. There is always a line.

A hand holds a laminated pastry with three pieces of bright orange and flaky salt.
A laminate pastry from Radio Bakery.
Nat Belkov/Eater NY

This narrow Sichuan restaurant sticks to a small menu for takeout and delivery only to offer the best possible renditions. All served with tongue-tickling spice and priced at $15 and under, diners can order the entire menu of string bean salad, spicy wontons, mapo tofu, noodle soup, and eggplant with chile-garlic sauce to create a very affordable at-home tasting menu.

Karczma

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One of the remaining hold-outs from when Greenpoint was teeming with Polish food, Karczma serves up classics like white borscht in bread bowls, sausages with cabbage, and the lesser-seen creamy pickle soup. During the colder months, the old-fashioned dark-wood tavern dining room is especially cozy.

Emily Yuen, former chef at Japanese comfort food spot Bessou, opened Lingo last year, serving eclectic Japanese fare and New American dishes with Japanese accents. Look for dishes like the Lingo beef pie, a Hokkaido-style braised beef curry, or spicy vodka-fried chicken (which makes the skin extra crisp).

A spread of dishes from Lingo.
A spread of dishes from Lingo.
Andrew Bui/Lingo

Oxomoco

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Justin Bazdarich’s Greenpoint hotspot is an airy, plant-filled dining room that feels like you’re on a splurge-y vacation. Sip frozen grapefruit palomas as you dive into tuna tartare, lamb-squash blossom tacos, and shrimp ceviche tostadas.

A bustling dining room packs customers at tables and a high-top bar.
Inside the plant-filled dining room.
Louise Palmberg

Di An Di

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Another naturally-lit, verdant Greenpoint favorite is this Vietnamese restaurant that was opened in 2018 by the team behind the Lower East Side’s now-shuttered An Choi. It’s hard to go wrong with any of the noodle soups, which come accompanied by house-made riffs on sriracha and hoisin, but the Hanoi-style pho with fatty brisket, a scattering of scallions, and a single, sunny yolk, stands out. Much of the menu is designed to be shared, and the long tables in the back room are ideal for larger groups.

Bún Cá (Fish noodle soup with fish and chicken broth, dill, turmeric fish ball, fish cracker, poached fish, water spinach stems, and thin vermicelli noodle)
Bún cá, fish noodle soup, at Di An Di.
Gary He/Eater NY

Fulgurances

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A Parisian hit has come to Brooklyn and built out a space in a former laundromat, Fulgurances hosts guest chefs for events that feel like a fancy dinner party. Currently, it’s former chef de cuisine at Claud, Nicholas Tamburo. Six courses is $89, with an optional $65 wine pairing.

Paulie Gee's Slice Shop

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Paulie Gee’s Slice Shop had lines down the block from the moment it opened in 2018, an off-shoot of a sit-down pizzeria a few blocks over. Order the Hellboy Squared, an “upside down” Sicilian slice with pepperoni, hot honey, and a sesame seed bottom, or the Freddy Prinze, a vegetarian version without meat or honey. A bar in the back offers beer, more seating, and screenings of classic movies.

A hot pours hot honey on pizza pie atop an orange table.
Pepperoni cups act as hot tubs of grease.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Taqueria Ramirez

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Like a slice of Mexico City tucked into residential Brooklyn, this counter-service taqueria serves street tacos piled high with longaniza (a cousin of chorizo), al pastor, suadero, and other meats. The small space with no alcohol is meant to keep customers moving, but it only sort of works: Customers take videos of the tripa being charred with a handheld blowtorch or consider their options at a salsa bar with cilantro, onions, and other toppings. Expect to find a line around peak meal times.

A knife cuts thin al pastor meat from the spit, which is caught by a gloved hand holding a tortilla.
A staffer cuts pork for al pastor tacos.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Peter Pan Donut & Pastry Shop

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Long before Manhattan Avenue was lined with trendy coffee shops, this local stalwart was serving sprinkle-dusted doughnuts by the dozen. Not much has changed at this cash-only bakery since 1953, which suits the clientele just fine. Doughnuts start at just over a buck each and breakfast sandwiches are equally reasonable — prices have refused to rise with the neighborhood’s profile. The early morning weekend rush sees a mix of old-timers and night owls drifting home from nearby nightlife spots in search of warm crullers. 

Two boxes of donuts, one containing pastries with bright pink icing and sprinkles; another with dark brown frosting and sprinkles.
You can’t go wrong at this old-school donut shop.
Diana Hubbell/Eater NY

The dining room at this high-ceiling restaurant warrants entry on this list alone, while the food is good enough for a celebration or important date. Order the bread basket and dips to start, then graduate to dressed-up veggies (the little gem salad is layered with tahini and curry leaves) and proteins, like fall-apart za’atar ribs or the kabocha squash.

Inside the plant-filled dining room of Nura, a high-ceilinged restaurant in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.
The high-ceilinged dining room at Nura.
Catherine Dzilenski/Nura

Dashi Okume

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Dashi Okume, a dashi shop and grilled fish counter, is one of several Japanese businesses that operate out of the building at 50 Norman Avenue in Greenpoint. Salmon, mackerel, and other fish are imported from Japan’s Toyosu Fish Market and then grilled as part of set meals that come with miso soup, rice, and seasonal sides. There are only three tables, with more seats at a counter, but the restaurant feels lively thanks to customers milling about at other businesses in the space.

A grilled salmon set with soup, rice, tea, and sides.
A grilled salmon set from Dashi Okume.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Uzuki is Shuichi Kotani’s soba destination, finally, a standalone restaurant from the city’s soba master, who’s been supplying restaurants since 2008. One of the most popular dishes is the duck shio soba, made with duck four ways — roasted, confit, Beijing-style, and as a bone broth simmered for six hours and pepped up with yuzu. He tops the noodle soup with more duck, verdant buckwheat sprouts that he’s growing at the restaurant, boiled buckwheat seeds, spinach, and fried scallions. Don’t miss it.

A man rolling dough into noodles.
Shuichi Kotani making soba noodles.
Kenji Yamagata/Uzuki

Frankel's Delicatessen & Appetizing

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This Jewish deli by Zach Frankel, a native New Yorker from the Upper West Side, and partner Taylor McEwan quickly became a neighborhood institution. The decidedly unkosher bacon, egg, and cheese sandwich makes for a killer hangover cure, and the recipe for the brisket piled on thick-cut challah comes from Frankel’s grandmother.

A pastrami and egg sandwich.
Breakfast sandwiches are the perfect hangover cure.
Frankel’s

Bernie’s

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Despite opening in 2018, Bernie’s feels like a nostalgic time warp. The restaurant channels vintage Americana, complete with gleaming red booths and checkered tablecloths and crayons for the kids. The restaurant serves a killer burger, but the chicken piccata and eggplant parmesan are great, too. Bernie’s doesn’t take reservations; on weekends, customers line up outside of the restaurant around opening time for a shot at a table.

Thinly pounded fried chicken topped with capers, lemon, and parsley on a white plate.
Capers aplenty on the chicken piccata.
Stefanie Tuder/Eater NY

Peep’s Kitchen

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Peep’s Kitchen is one of Greenpoint’s best-kept secrets. The small, family-run shop specializes in Korean fried chicken. The gangjeong preparation, pictured here, is stir-fried in a sticky, sweet sauce, then topped with sesame seeds and sliced almonds, but the padak is also good: It comes without sauce and has shaved scallions on top. The small restaurant does not have indoor seating, but it’s a great takeout option in the area and serves its food on most delivery apps.

A paper container is lined with aluminum foil and filled with saucy glazed chicken, sesame seeds, and sliced almond.
Boneless chicken is done-up with sesame seeds and sliced almonds.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Wenwen

Eric Sze and Andy Chuang, the duo behind 886, a casual stir-fry shop in the East Village, continue to spread the gospel of Taiwan’s diverse foodways. Wenwen is the more elegant of the two restaurants but it shares the same boozy DNA as 886, especially with upscale riffs on Long Island ice tea highballs. Line up early when Wenwen opens for the BDSM chicken (the birds sell out quickly), or drop by later for numbing celtuce with Sichuan pepper, crispy fried tofu with garlic-soy paste, and youfan sticky rice with bacon and dried scallops.

Customers pick at dishes with red chopsticks at a crowded dining room table.
Wenwen is for adults, too.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Ilis

Noma co-founder Mads Refslund has opened a destination-worthy restaurant if there ever were one, housed in a dramatic warehouse-turned-dining room with two tasting menus ($195, $295) and a la carte at the bar. Drink an elixir from a giant clam shell tied with a rope that comes off a rolling cart of iced shellfish, or snack on whelk or big-eyed tuna. Antelope, fluke, and Amish chicken have made appearances among main courses, as has porridge for dessert.

The inside of Ilis, with a bank of walk-ins in the dining room.
The dining room at Ilis.
Evan Sung/Ilis

Achilles Heel

Achilles Heel is one of those places that strikes the right note any time of day: casual or date-ready, good for a full-blown meal or just drinks. This spot from restaurateur Andrew Tarlow (behind North Brooklyn heavy-hitters like Diner), was transformed by chef Sunny Lee — known for her Banchan by Sunny pop-ups — last year. Under her direction, the restaurant feels entirely new, most have a Korean spin, with lots of rotating vegetables. During the winter, Achilles Heel has a fireplace for warming up.

Radio Bakery

This newish bakery owned by the team behind Rolo’s is led by Kelly Mencin. The online menu lists an array of croissants —vanilla citrus, maple breakfast sausage — corn cakes, cookies, and pan loafs. And if you’re looking for more of a meal, there’s breakfast and lunch sandwiches and focaccia. There is always a line.

A hand holds a laminated pastry with three pieces of bright orange and flaky salt.
A laminate pastry from Radio Bakery.
Nat Belkov/Eater NY

Chiko

This narrow Sichuan restaurant sticks to a small menu for takeout and delivery only to offer the best possible renditions. All served with tongue-tickling spice and priced at $15 and under, diners can order the entire menu of string bean salad, spicy wontons, mapo tofu, noodle soup, and eggplant with chile-garlic sauce to create a very affordable at-home tasting menu.

Karczma

One of the remaining hold-outs from when Greenpoint was teeming with Polish food, Karczma serves up classics like white borscht in bread bowls, sausages with cabbage, and the lesser-seen creamy pickle soup. During the colder months, the old-fashioned dark-wood tavern dining room is especially cozy.

Lingo

Emily Yuen, former chef at Japanese comfort food spot Bessou, opened Lingo last year, serving eclectic Japanese fare and New American dishes with Japanese accents. Look for dishes like the Lingo beef pie, a Hokkaido-style braised beef curry, or spicy vodka-fried chicken (which makes the skin extra crisp).

A spread of dishes from Lingo.
A spread of dishes from Lingo.
Andrew Bui/Lingo

Oxomoco

Justin Bazdarich’s Greenpoint hotspot is an airy, plant-filled dining room that feels like you’re on a splurge-y vacation. Sip frozen grapefruit palomas as you dive into tuna tartare, lamb-squash blossom tacos, and shrimp ceviche tostadas.

A bustling dining room packs customers at tables and a high-top bar.
Inside the plant-filled dining room.
Louise Palmberg

Di An Di

Another naturally-lit, verdant Greenpoint favorite is this Vietnamese restaurant that was opened in 2018 by the team behind the Lower East Side’s now-shuttered An Choi. It’s hard to go wrong with any of the noodle soups, which come accompanied by house-made riffs on sriracha and hoisin, but the Hanoi-style pho with fatty brisket, a scattering of scallions, and a single, sunny yolk, stands out. Much of the menu is designed to be shared, and the long tables in the back room are ideal for larger groups.

Bún Cá (Fish noodle soup with fish and chicken broth, dill, turmeric fish ball, fish cracker, poached fish, water spinach stems, and thin vermicelli noodle)
Bún cá, fish noodle soup, at Di An Di.
Gary He/Eater NY

Fulgurances

A Parisian hit has come to Brooklyn and built out a space in a former laundromat, Fulgurances hosts guest chefs for events that feel like a fancy dinner party. Currently, it’s former chef de cuisine at Claud, Nicholas Tamburo. Six courses is $89, with an optional $65 wine pairing.

Paulie Gee's Slice Shop

Paulie Gee’s Slice Shop had lines down the block from the moment it opened in 2018, an off-shoot of a sit-down pizzeria a few blocks over. Order the Hellboy Squared, an “upside down” Sicilian slice with pepperoni, hot honey, and a sesame seed bottom, or the Freddy Prinze, a vegetarian version without meat or honey. A bar in the back offers beer, more seating, and screenings of classic movies.

A hot pours hot honey on pizza pie atop an orange table.
Pepperoni cups act as hot tubs of grease.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Taqueria Ramirez

Like a slice of Mexico City tucked into residential Brooklyn, this counter-service taqueria serves street tacos piled high with longaniza (a cousin of chorizo), al pastor, suadero, and other meats. The small space with no alcohol is meant to keep customers moving, but it only sort of works: Customers take videos of the tripa being charred with a handheld blowtorch or consider their options at a salsa bar with cilantro, onions, and other toppings. Expect to find a line around peak meal times.

A knife cuts thin al pastor meat from the spit, which is caught by a gloved hand holding a tortilla.
A staffer cuts pork for al pastor tacos.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Peter Pan Donut & Pastry Shop

Long before Manhattan Avenue was lined with trendy coffee shops, this local stalwart was serving sprinkle-dusted doughnuts by the dozen. Not much has changed at this cash-only bakery since 1953, which suits the clientele just fine. Doughnuts start at just over a buck each and breakfast sandwiches are equally reasonable — prices have refused to rise with the neighborhood’s profile. The early morning weekend rush sees a mix of old-timers and night owls drifting home from nearby nightlife spots in search of warm crullers. 

Two boxes of donuts, one containing pastries with bright pink icing and sprinkles; another with dark brown frosting and sprinkles.
You can’t go wrong at this old-school donut shop.
Diana Hubbell/Eater NY

Nura

The dining room at this high-ceiling restaurant warrants entry on this list alone, while the food is good enough for a celebration or important date. Order the bread basket and dips to start, then graduate to dressed-up veggies (the little gem salad is layered with tahini and curry leaves) and proteins, like fall-apart za’atar ribs or the kabocha squash.

Inside the plant-filled dining room of Nura, a high-ceilinged restaurant in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.
The high-ceilinged dining room at Nura.
Catherine Dzilenski/Nura

Dashi Okume

Dashi Okume, a dashi shop and grilled fish counter, is one of several Japanese businesses that operate out of the building at 50 Norman Avenue in Greenpoint. Salmon, mackerel, and other fish are imported from Japan’s Toyosu Fish Market and then grilled as part of set meals that come with miso soup, rice, and seasonal sides. There are only three tables, with more seats at a counter, but the restaurant feels lively thanks to customers milling about at other businesses in the space.

A grilled salmon set with soup, rice, tea, and sides.
A grilled salmon set from Dashi Okume.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Related Maps

Uzuki

Uzuki is Shuichi Kotani’s soba destination, finally, a standalone restaurant from the city’s soba master, who’s been supplying restaurants since 2008. One of the most popular dishes is the duck shio soba, made with duck four ways — roasted, confit, Beijing-style, and as a bone broth simmered for six hours and pepped up with yuzu. He tops the noodle soup with more duck, verdant buckwheat sprouts that he’s growing at the restaurant, boiled buckwheat seeds, spinach, and fried scallions. Don’t miss it.

A man rolling dough into noodles.
Shuichi Kotani making soba noodles.
Kenji Yamagata/Uzuki

Frankel's Delicatessen & Appetizing

This Jewish deli by Zach Frankel, a native New Yorker from the Upper West Side, and partner Taylor McEwan quickly became a neighborhood institution. The decidedly unkosher bacon, egg, and cheese sandwich makes for a killer hangover cure, and the recipe for the brisket piled on thick-cut challah comes from Frankel’s grandmother.

A pastrami and egg sandwich.
Breakfast sandwiches are the perfect hangover cure.
Frankel’s

Bernie’s

Despite opening in 2018, Bernie’s feels like a nostalgic time warp. The restaurant channels vintage Americana, complete with gleaming red booths and checkered tablecloths and crayons for the kids. The restaurant serves a killer burger, but the chicken piccata and eggplant parmesan are great, too. Bernie’s doesn’t take reservations; on weekends, customers line up outside of the restaurant around opening time for a shot at a table.

Thinly pounded fried chicken topped with capers, lemon, and parsley on a white plate.
Capers aplenty on the chicken piccata.
Stefanie Tuder/Eater NY

Peep’s Kitchen

Peep’s Kitchen is one of Greenpoint’s best-kept secrets. The small, family-run shop specializes in Korean fried chicken. The gangjeong preparation, pictured here, is stir-fried in a sticky, sweet sauce, then topped with sesame seeds and sliced almonds, but the padak is also good: It comes without sauce and has shaved scallions on top. The small restaurant does not have indoor seating, but it’s a great takeout option in the area and serves its food on most delivery apps.

A paper container is lined with aluminum foil and filled with saucy glazed chicken, sesame seeds, and sliced almond.
Boneless chicken is done-up with sesame seeds and sliced almonds.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Related Maps