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Coney Island
Coney Island
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Where to Eat in Coney Island

Hot dogs, tacos, candy apples, and cheap beer await

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Coney Island
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Headed to Coney Island for a day trip? Totonno’s iconic pizza and Nathan’s famous hot dogs top the list, but there’s plenty more food and drink to be sampled. Read on for where to graze on and off the boardwalk.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Totonno's Pizzeria Napolitano

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The nearly 100-year-old pizzeria — open since 1921 — has long solidified its legacy among NYC’s pizza institutions. Run by the grandchildren of the original creators, Totonno’s dishes out some of the best thin-crust, Neapolitan-style pies around. Though it closes pretty early in the evening at 7:30 p.m., there are lines often out the door with beach goers and non-beach goers alike wanting to grab a bite.

Three slices of Totonno’s pizza, which has splotches of white mozzarella. Bill Addison/Eater

Gargiulos Coney Island

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Garguilo’s has been a Coney Island staple since its opening in 1907. After being hit hard by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the restaurant reopened with its old-school, classic Italian cuisine and grand decor. It’s a fancier way to top off your day strolling on the boardwalk or hitting up the aquarium.

Gargiulos Coney Island Gargiulos Coney Island [Official Photo]

Footprints Cafe

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It’s not a shock to say that Coney Island is far, far from a Caribbean retreat, but Footprints Cafe transports diners there with jerk chicken, oxtail, fried plantains, and codfish cakes. A frequent spot for live music and DJs, Footprints can easily make people forget they’re still in New York and not lost on an island somewhere.

Footprints Cafe Footprints Cafe [Official Photo]

Nathan's Famous

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Since 1916, this fast-food establishment has been serving up some of New York’s most famous dogs to beach goers and Cyclone riders alike. Fun fact: Nathan’s founder Nathan Handwerker originally was a bun-slicer at rival Coney Island hot dog establishment Feltman’s. Even though Nathan’s hot dogs are available at every mall and highway rest stop in America, they’re better here.

Aa hand holds two hot dogs in buns in paper containers about to apply mustard. Robert Sietsema

William's Candy Shop

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Williams is the place to satisfy a candy apple craving. But there’s also ice cream, homemade marshmallow treats, and an array of others items for those with a sweet tooth.

Plaza Mexico Dona Zita

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Coney Island is known for its hot dogs, but Dona Zita provides a taco alternative instead. Located near the Wonder Wheel, this taco stand sells $3.50 tacos, $9 quesadillas, and $10 tortas, plus some Mexican-inspired hot dogs like one topped with pico de gallo or chorizo.

Paul's Daughter

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Paul’s Daughter is a snack counter that’s been on the boardwalk since 1962, known for the little hamburger guy that sits on top of the building. The $4 dog is pretty good, too.

Ruby's Bar & Grill

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An iconic boardwalk institution, Ruby’s touts itself as the only place to still walk under the boardwalk. The bar has been in the same family since 1972 and serves beach-friendly snacks like cheeseburgers and seafood. Visit for a hot dog or a knish and no shortage of cheap beer.

Ruby’s Ruby’s [Official Photo]

Kitchen 21

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Occupying the massive, landmarked home of the once-thriving Childs restaurant, Kitchen 21 opened in 2017 as a dining companion to its neighbor, the Ford Amphitheater. It’s essentially five restaurants in one: a 24-seat cafe for grab-and-go fare; Community Clam Bar with growlers of beer and a raw bar; Parachute Bar as a gastropub with 32 beers on tap; and a rooftop bar at Boardwalk & Vine.

Kitchen 21 Ryan Birchmeier/NYCEDC [Official Photo]

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Totonno's Pizzeria Napolitano

Three slices of Totonno’s pizza, which has splotches of white mozzarella. Bill Addison/Eater

The nearly 100-year-old pizzeria — open since 1921 — has long solidified its legacy among NYC’s pizza institutions. Run by the grandchildren of the original creators, Totonno’s dishes out some of the best thin-crust, Neapolitan-style pies around. Though it closes pretty early in the evening at 7:30 p.m., there are lines often out the door with beach goers and non-beach goers alike wanting to grab a bite.

Three slices of Totonno’s pizza, which has splotches of white mozzarella. Bill Addison/Eater

Gargiulos Coney Island

Gargiulos Coney Island Gargiulos Coney Island [Official Photo]

Garguilo’s has been a Coney Island staple since its opening in 1907. After being hit hard by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the restaurant reopened with its old-school, classic Italian cuisine and grand decor. It’s a fancier way to top off your day strolling on the boardwalk or hitting up the aquarium.

Gargiulos Coney Island Gargiulos Coney Island [Official Photo]

Footprints Cafe

Footprints Cafe Footprints Cafe [Official Photo]

It’s not a shock to say that Coney Island is far, far from a Caribbean retreat, but Footprints Cafe transports diners there with jerk chicken, oxtail, fried plantains, and codfish cakes. A frequent spot for live music and DJs, Footprints can easily make people forget they’re still in New York and not lost on an island somewhere.

Footprints Cafe Footprints Cafe [Official Photo]

Nathan's Famous

Aa hand holds two hot dogs in buns in paper containers about to apply mustard. Robert Sietsema

Since 1916, this fast-food establishment has been serving up some of New York’s most famous dogs to beach goers and Cyclone riders alike. Fun fact: Nathan’s founder Nathan Handwerker originally was a bun-slicer at rival Coney Island hot dog establishment Feltman’s. Even though Nathan’s hot dogs are available at every mall and highway rest stop in America, they’re better here.

Aa hand holds two hot dogs in buns in paper containers about to apply mustard. Robert Sietsema

William's Candy Shop

Williams is the place to satisfy a candy apple craving. But there’s also ice cream, homemade marshmallow treats, and an array of others items for those with a sweet tooth.

Plaza Mexico Dona Zita

Coney Island is known for its hot dogs, but Dona Zita provides a taco alternative instead. Located near the Wonder Wheel, this taco stand sells $3.50 tacos, $9 quesadillas, and $10 tortas, plus some Mexican-inspired hot dogs like one topped with pico de gallo or chorizo.

Paul's Daughter

Paul’s Daughter is a snack counter that’s been on the boardwalk since 1962, known for the little hamburger guy that sits on top of the building. The $4 dog is pretty good, too.

Ruby's Bar & Grill

Ruby’s Ruby’s [Official Photo]

An iconic boardwalk institution, Ruby’s touts itself as the only place to still walk under the boardwalk. The bar has been in the same family since 1972 and serves beach-friendly snacks like cheeseburgers and seafood. Visit for a hot dog or a knish and no shortage of cheap beer.

Ruby’s Ruby’s [Official Photo]

Kitchen 21

Kitchen 21 Ryan Birchmeier/NYCEDC [Official Photo]

Occupying the massive, landmarked home of the once-thriving Childs restaurant, Kitchen 21 opened in 2017 as a dining companion to its neighbor, the Ford Amphitheater. It’s essentially five restaurants in one: a 24-seat cafe for grab-and-go fare; Community Clam Bar with growlers of beer and a raw bar; Parachute Bar as a gastropub with 32 beers on tap; and a rooftop bar at Boardwalk & Vine.

Kitchen 21 Ryan Birchmeier/NYCEDC [Official Photo]

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