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An overhead photograph of a bowl of brick-red soup with chunks of chicken, potatoes, and sprigs of cilantro. A takeout container of noodles sits to the side.
Big tray chicken at Spicy Village.
Luke Fortney/Eater

Where to Eat in Manhattan’s Chinatown

From fresh rice noodle rolls to dumplings galore, here’s where to eat in New York’s oldest and most famous Chinatown

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Big tray chicken at Spicy Village.
| Luke Fortney/Eater

While there are plenty of pockets of New York City with stellar Chinese food, Manhattan’s Chinatown is still a leading destination for offering its diverse and flavorful cuisine. Cantonese fare and dim sum are still prominent in this neighborhood, though there are plenty of regional cuisines to be found from Shanghainese to Teochew. Soup dumplings, noodle soup, stir fries, and fresh whole steamed fish are in abundance in this historic neighborhood, and not only are they some of the city’s best, they’re also highly affordable. Ahead, the 25 top restaurants in Manhattan’s Chinatown for a proper feast.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; the latest data about the delta variant indicates that it may pose a low-to-moderate risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Dr. Clark

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104 Bayard St
New York, NY 10013
(917) 426-4454
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It’s best to gather a group at this restaurant specializing in the cuisine of Hokkaido. While the Japanese island is known for its pristine sea urchin, mutton is the star ingredient here and it is prepared in nearly a dozen ways. The communal meal is also fun to share at one of the kotatsu tables, which are perfect for colder nights.

2. New York Bo Ky

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94 Baxter St
New York, NY 10013
(646) 590-9978

Thank goodness Bo Ky, the city’s foremost Teochew restaurant — a Chinese cuisine showing Southeast Asian influences — has reopened after a pandemic closure. Specializing in soups and noodles, its offshoot New York Bo Ky is also still going strong, the only one with outdoor seating, located in a Vietnamese-leaning section of Baxter Street. A Teochew spin on pho is available (try the version with beef balls), and so is a wonderful Cambodian noodle soup. Braised duck, a signature of the cuisine, is available off-menu.

A bowl of noodle soup with shrimp, pork, and fish balls, with broth and chile oil in separate bowls, above. Robert Sietsema/Eater

3. Fried Dumpling

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106 Mosco St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 693-1060
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Hidden on a more obscure, steep street lies Fried Dumpling, a stall that revolutionized cheap eats when it opened in 1999 on the Lower East Side. Five pork pot stickers used to go for a dollar, and they’re still under $2. It’s an ideal, quick pit stop of a snack.

A woman in a red jacket with a white paper hat serves dumplings to a line of customers Gary He/Eater

4. Peking Duck House

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28 Mott St # A
New York, NY 10013
(212) 227-1810
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Peking Duck House has long been a stop for celebrations, mainly for its large-format duck feasts and BYOB policy. Eating there is entertainment, too, with experienced chefs slicing up whole ducks with perfectly crisp skins tableside. The restaurant, which also has a Midtown location, is a great option for larger groups.

An entire browned duck, including prominent head and neck. Robert Sietsema/Eater

5. Ping’s

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22 Mott St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 602-9988
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The Cantonese spot helmed by chef Chuen Ping Hui has been serving consistently fresh seafood since the mid-1990s — and was once a major attraction for food critics. It was also one of the first places to serve dim sum in the afternoon and on into the evening. Today, Eater critic Robert Sietsema recommends the Thai bass, a “perfectly prepared” steamed fish that’s caught and cooked on the spot; e-fu noodles with lobster; and Portuguese-style baked conch.

A long dining room with yellow paint on the wall juxtaposed with wooden panels. Several people are sitting at round tables. Robert Sietsema/Eater

6. Mee Sum Cafe

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26 Pell St
New York, NY 10013

This overlooked Chinatown tea shop dates back to the 1960s. It’s an old-school spot for inexpensive dim sum; servings of rice dishes with chicken, duck, or pork; and steaming bowls of congee. Diners can either sit at a counter or a few tables in the back of the parlor, or simply grab a leaf-wrapped bundle of sticky rice, known as joong, to go. Don’t miss out on the wonton soup.

A white bowl with a soup in it from within which yellow dumplings are seen peeking out along with leafy greens. Robert Sietsema/Eater

7. Nom Wah Tea Parlor

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13 Doyers St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 392-6800
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Born as a tea parlor and bakery nearly a century ago, Nom Wah remains a thriving staple of the New York dim sum world. Prospective patrons wait outside on Doyers — reservations aren’t accepted on weekends — until they’re called into the dining room, which channels a packed 1950s diner. Menu highlights include fluffy pork buns, chock-full of sweet swing and onions, crab claws encased in chopped and fried shrimp, and any variant of siu mai. 

Gary He/Eater

8. The Original Chinatown Ice Cream Factory

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65 Bayard St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 608-4170
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Follow up a visit to any of the restaurants on this list with dessert at this petite ice cream shop that’s one of New York’s oldest and very best. Speciality flavors like black sesame, lychee, and a highly nutty zen butter — that’s peanut butter ice cream with toasted sesame seeds — shouldn’t be missed, though the fluffy texture is lovely with vanilla and strawberry as well. Any flavor can be packed in a pint and taken home for another time, too.

Three yellow cups with green, orange, and blue colored ice cream in them. Each of them have two spoons in them as well. Gary He/Eater

9. Taiwan Pork Chop House

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3 Doyers St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 791-7007
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Yes, there’s a lengthy menu running to regular Cantonese, a few Sichuan, and bedrock Taiwanese dishes, but most diners sit down to one of the two specialties of the house, offered with abundant quantities on rice and pickled mustard greens. The epic, thin-cut pork chops with a sweet glaze, or the bulbous chicken leg, briny and delicious. Both are equally good, but it poses the question: which one to choose?

A pile of pork chops on rice in a round black plastic container. Robert Sietsema/Eater

10. Deluxe Green Bo Restaurant

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66 Bayard St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 625-2359
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Dining here often involves a front-row seat to some dumpling-making action; the dim sum favorites are pleated and folded right at the entrance of the restaurant. The go-to order at this Shanghainese staple is the super-porky soup dumplings whose thin skins are filled with a very savory broth. Fill out a meal with Shanghai-style pork rice cakes and flaky scallion pancakes.

11. Mei Li Wah

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64 Bayard St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 966-7866
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Devotees of this lasting Bayard Street bakery line up for its plump char siu bao — a baked pork bun that quite literally glistens. It’s ideally sweet and savory, and just $1.35. The sweeter pineapple pork bun is also a favorite.

A hand holds an open bun, filled with barbecued pork. Adam Moussa/Eater

12. Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles

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1 Doyers St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 791-1817
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A few steps away from the original Nom Wah is this noodle purveyor and its numerous noodle options. Styles vary — the kind of noodle, toppings, and whether it arrives pan-fried or in a soup — but it’s difficult to land on a bowl that’s not a winner. Go for the thicker and wider options, and don’t miss the pan-fried pork dumplings, often better than what’s found at some of the city’s specialty dumpling shops. 

A bowl of thick noodles in soup with a fried egg on top. Robert Sietsema/Eater

13. Great NY Noodletown

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28 Bowery
New York, NY 10013
(212) 349-0923
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Great NY Noodletown remains the quintessential late-night haunt in Chinatown, with its glowing yellow sign acting as a beacon in the after hours. All the Cantonese magic happens in the plain, utilitarian room where patrons feast on hacked-up roasted duck (on display at the counter), salted-baked flounder, and perhaps most famously, ginger scallion noodles, golden-hued and topped with hoisin for good measure.

A group of mainly men sit around a table eating soup, chandeliers hang overhead. Robert Sietsema/Eater

14. Golden Steamer

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143A Mott St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 226-1886

As the old-guard Cantonese coffee shops like Hop Shing have closed, where does one go for the baked and steamed bao, steamed dumplings, and rice noodle rolls that are one of Chinatown’s greatest treasures? Golden Steamer is a narrow stall resembles a spa steam room, except the shelves and cabinets are lined with farinaceous goodies, with fillings that run from savory to sweet, so it’s a great dessert spot, too. There’s no seating, however.

Three pastries dramatically lit, including a yellow custard pie and roll with hot dog peeping out. Robert Sietsema/Eater

15. Bánh Mì Saigon

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198 Grand St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 941-1541

The banh mi was invented in the 1950s, but it didn’t make its way to New York’s Chinatown until 1989, when Banh Mi Saigon moved into the back of a jewelry store on Mott Street. Eventually, it opened its own bakery around the corner on Grand Street, making its own light and crusty baguettes. Of the 13 sandwiches offered, the number one, with the cafe’s famous barbecued pork, is a good bet, but then so are the pork chop, curried chicken, and tofu versions. Don’t neglect the snacks either, including the giant shrimp crackers perfect for snacking.

A bright banh mi sandwich seen in cross section with orange carrots, leafy deep green sprigs of cilantro, and layered meats. Robert Sietsema/Eater

16. Hwa Yuan Szechuan

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42 E Broadway
New York, NY 10002
(212) 966-6002
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Decades after it shut, famed Sichuan restaurant Hwa Yuan, founded by legendary chef Shorty Tang, reopened in 2017 in the same location, and the food is just as good according to Eater critic Robert Sietsema. The sesame noodles, spicy wine chicken, Tang’s amazing tofu, and double sautéed pork are some of the highlights in this glamorous, spacious destination that seats more than 160 people.

A glistening bowl of tofu with tendrils of meat and black beans. Robert Sietsema/Eater

17. Green Garden Village

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216 Grand St
New York, NY 10013
(646) 912-9136
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Cantonese food has been enjoying a resurgence lately, even as other regional styles have washed over the neighborhood, and Green Garden Village is a prime example. It has a lush display of window charcuterie in an expanded array, as well an impressive seafood selection, though standards like wonton soup (in deconstructed form!) and beef chow fun hold their own. It’s also a great place for dim sum, especially for rice noodle rolls.

Wontons rest on a nest of noodles framed by bok choy, with soup on the side. Robert Sietsema/Eater

18. Yi Ji Shi Mo

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88 Elizabeth St
New York, NY 10013
(646) 233-6311

Amid the city’s booming cheung fun scene, which includes Guangdong import Yin Ji and Joe’s at Canal Street Market, Yi Ji Shi Mo easily ranks as one of the most intimate, adept, and fragrant purveyors. At this tiny storefront, located just below street level, a cook methodically and masterfully steams rice milk into firm, multi-layered noodles, sometimes laced with funky shrimp or sweet knobs of pork with chives. Eat them immediately.

A cook scrapes steamed rice milk into a roll at Yi Ji Shi Mo.
A cook scrapes steamed rice milk into a roll at Yi Ji Shi Mo
Tony Lin/Eater

19. Friendship BBQ

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103 Bowery
New York, NY 10002
(212) 775-8998
Visit Website

Flushing’s popular late-night street food spot opened this massive Manhattan outpost with just as large a menu. The 90-seat restaurant spotlights a variety of meat and vegetable skewers like lotus root slices, chicken heart, and cumin-dusted lamb. Grilled fish, hot pot, and a Chinese-style seafood boil with crawfish, crab, and shrimp are also on deck.

A sesame seed coated skewer of meat in foreground, bowl of red skinned peanuts in background. Robert Sietsema/Eater

20. Wah Fung Fast Food

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79 Chrystie St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 925-5175

It’s not uncommon to find lines snaking out the door at Wah Fung Fast Food, which serves some of the city’s most satisfying roasted meats in meal-sized portions. Most will be going for the slightly sweet roasted pork over rice, which sells out for customers arriving too late in the day. There’s nowhere to sit here — the space is narrow — so watch the staff expertly chop barbecued meats and toss them over rice, and then bring the meal home or to eat in the nearby park, when weather permits. Bring cash.

Chinese duck cut up over rice with green sauce on top. Robert Sietsema/Eater

21. King’s Kitchen

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Read Review |
92 E Broadway
New York, NY 10002
(212) 966-7288

Head to this Hong Kong-style restaurant for Cantonese barbecued meats like duck served over rice, noodle stir-fries like beef chow fun and “super-wonderful” steamed rice rolls. The restaurant opens at 7 a.m., so feel free to stop by for a bowl of congee in the morning, or what Eater critic Robert Sietsema calls “the world’s best breakfast.”

A clay pot filled with rice and eel
Eel bo zai fan
Paul Crispin Quitoriano/Eater

22. Super Taste

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26 Eldridge St
New York, NY 10002
(646) 283-0999

Hand-pulled noodles where introduced to NYC by Super Taste in 2005, when noodle master Steven Yan began serving the now popular carb. Over 10 years later, Super Taste remains one of the best locales for hand-pulled noodles in town. Scintillating add-ins range from oxtail to duck to cow stomach, but the house special, rich with beef, is the repeat favorite. An order of satisfying pork and chive pot stickers should accompany every bowl of noodles here.

A small storefront with glass windows and a red awning. Robert Sietsema/Eater

23. Spicy Village

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68 Forsyth St B
New York, NY 10002
(212) 625-8299
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Wendy Lian and Ren Fu Li’s gem of a Forsyth Street restaurant is a temple to a spectacular dish: big tray spicy chicken (dà pán jī). The preparation involves dousing thick, hand-pulled noodles in a stew of chicken, garlic, potatoes, cumin, chiles, and star anise. With the capacity to feed at least two, the $16 feast ranks as one of the city’s best large-format deals. Also go for a pork pancake, where stewed pork comes in sandwich form as a must-get appetizer. Note: Spicy Village is BYOB.

A big metal bowl with stewed chicken and noodles, topped with a pile of cilantro Photo via Eater Video

24. Harpers Bread House

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271 Grand St
New York, NY 10002

The decades-old institution remains one of Chinatown’s top bakeries, a place for affordable, Chinese pastries. Hot dog scallion buns are always a smart move here, as are the freshly made onigiri rice balls. But the chief draw is a warm egg tart (dan tat), filled with obscenely rich custard, dense with the richness of good yolks with the top bruleed for a Portuguese-style treat. Also look out for the ham and omelet breakfast sandwich.

Colorful signs line the windows at the entrance to Harper’s Bread House
The entrance to Harper’s Bread House
Robert Sietsema/Eater

25. Wu's Wonton King

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165 E Broadway
New York, NY 10002
(212) 477-1111
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Though a relatively new addition to the Cantonese restaurants in New York — it opened in 2016 — Wu’s is an old-school counterpoint to the restaurants that surround it on the Lower East Side. The crispy garlic chicken is famous here; get it plus a couple barbecue buns, Dungeness crab, and golden fried rice. Like Peking Duck House, Wu’s has garnered a wine crowd following for its welcoming BYOB policy. 

A corner restaurant has brightly lit, block font signs saying Wu’s Wonton King. Robert Sietsema/Eater

1. Dr. Clark

104 Bayard St, New York, NY 10013

It’s best to gather a group at this restaurant specializing in the cuisine of Hokkaido. While the Japanese island is known for its pristine sea urchin, mutton is the star ingredient here and it is prepared in nearly a dozen ways. The communal meal is also fun to share at one of the kotatsu tables, which are perfect for colder nights.

104 Bayard St
New York, NY 10013

2. New York Bo Ky

94 Baxter St, New York, NY 10013
A bowl of noodle soup with shrimp, pork, and fish balls, with broth and chile oil in separate bowls, above. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Thank goodness Bo Ky, the city’s foremost Teochew restaurant — a Chinese cuisine showing Southeast Asian influences — has reopened after a pandemic closure. Specializing in soups and noodles, its offshoot New York Bo Ky is also still going strong, the only one with outdoor seating, located in a Vietnamese-leaning section of Baxter Street. A Teochew spin on pho is available (try the version with beef balls), and so is a wonderful Cambodian noodle soup. Braised duck, a signature of the cuisine, is available off-menu.

94 Baxter St
New York, NY 10013

3. Fried Dumpling

106 Mosco St, New York, NY 10013
A woman in a red jacket with a white paper hat serves dumplings to a line of customers Gary He/Eater

Hidden on a more obscure, steep street lies Fried Dumpling, a stall that revolutionized cheap eats when it opened in 1999 on the Lower East Side. Five pork pot stickers used to go for a dollar, and they’re still under $2. It’s an ideal, quick pit stop of a snack.

106 Mosco St
New York, NY 10013

4. Peking Duck House

28 Mott St # A, New York, NY 10013
An entire browned duck, including prominent head and neck. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Peking Duck House has long been a stop for celebrations, mainly for its large-format duck feasts and BYOB policy. Eating there is entertainment, too, with experienced chefs slicing up whole ducks with perfectly crisp skins tableside. The restaurant, which also has a Midtown location, is a great option for larger groups.

28 Mott St # A
New York, NY 10013

5. Ping’s

22 Mott St, New York, NY 10013
A long dining room with yellow paint on the wall juxtaposed with wooden panels. Several people are sitting at round tables. Robert Sietsema/Eater

The Cantonese spot helmed by chef Chuen Ping Hui has been serving consistently fresh seafood since the mid-1990s — and was once a major attraction for food critics. It was also one of the first places to serve dim sum in the afternoon and on into the evening. Today, Eater critic Robert Sietsema recommends the Thai bass, a “perfectly prepared” steamed fish that’s caught and cooked on the spot; e-fu noodles with lobster; and Portuguese-style baked conch.

22 Mott St
New York, NY 10013

6. Mee Sum Cafe

26 Pell St, New York, NY 10013
A white bowl with a soup in it from within which yellow dumplings are seen peeking out along with leafy greens. Robert Sietsema/Eater

This overlooked Chinatown tea shop dates back to the 1960s. It’s an old-school spot for inexpensive dim sum; servings of rice dishes with chicken, duck, or pork; and steaming bowls of congee. Diners can either sit at a counter or a few tables in the back of the parlor, or simply grab a leaf-wrapped bundle of sticky rice, known as joong, to go. Don’t miss out on the wonton soup.

26 Pell St
New York, NY 10013

7. Nom Wah Tea Parlor

13 Doyers St, New York, NY 10013
Gary He/Eater

Born as a tea parlor and bakery nearly a century ago, Nom Wah remains a thriving staple of the New York dim sum world. Prospective patrons wait outside on Doyers — reservations aren’t accepted on weekends — until they’re called into the dining room, which channels a packed 1950s diner. Menu highlights include fluffy pork buns, chock-full of sweet swing and onions, crab claws encased in chopped and fried shrimp, and any variant of siu mai. 

13 Doyers St
New York, NY 10013

8. The Original Chinatown Ice Cream Factory

65 Bayard St, New York, NY 10013
Three yellow cups with green, orange, and blue colored ice cream in them. Each of them have two spoons in them as well. Gary He/Eater

Follow up a visit to any of the restaurants on this list with dessert at this petite ice cream shop that’s one of New York’s oldest and very best. Speciality flavors like black sesame, lychee, and a highly nutty zen butter — that’s peanut butter ice cream with toasted sesame seeds — shouldn’t be missed, though the fluffy texture is lovely with vanilla and strawberry as well. Any flavor can be packed in a pint and taken home for another time, too.

65 Bayard St
New York, NY 10013

9. Taiwan Pork Chop House

3 Doyers St, New York, NY 10013
A pile of pork chops on rice in a round black plastic container. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Yes, there’s a lengthy menu running to regular Cantonese, a few Sichuan, and bedrock Taiwanese dishes, but most diners sit down to one of the two specialties of the house, offered with abundant quantities on rice and pickled mustard greens. The epic, thin-cut pork chops with a sweet glaze, or the bulbous chicken leg, briny and delicious. Both are equally good, but it poses the question: which one to choose?

3 Doyers St
New York, NY 10013

10. Deluxe Green Bo Restaurant

66 Bayard St, New York, NY 10013

Dining here often involves a front-row seat to some dumpling-making action; the dim sum favorites are pleated and folded right at the entrance of the restaurant. The go-to order at this Shanghainese staple is the super-porky soup dumplings whose thin skins are filled with a very savory broth. Fill out a meal with Shanghai-style pork rice cakes and flaky scallion pancakes.

66 Bayard St
New York, NY 10013

11. Mei Li Wah

64 Bayard St, New York, NY 10013
A hand holds an open bun, filled with barbecued pork. Adam Moussa/Eater

Devotees of this lasting Bayard Street bakery line up for its plump char siu bao — a baked pork bun that quite literally glistens. It’s ideally sweet and savory, and just $1.35. The sweeter pineapple pork bun is also a favorite.

64 Bayard St
New York, NY 10013

12. Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles

1 Doyers St, New York, NY 10013
A bowl of thick noodles in soup with a fried egg on top. Robert Sietsema/Eater

A few steps away from the original Nom Wah is this noodle purveyor and its numerous noodle options. Styles vary — the kind of noodle, toppings, and whether it arrives pan-fried or in a soup — but it’s difficult to land on a bowl that’s not a winner. Go for the thicker and wider options, and don’t miss the pan-fried pork dumplings, often better than what’s found at some of the city’s specialty dumpling shops. 

1 Doyers St
New York, NY 10013

13. Great NY Noodletown

28 Bowery, New York, NY 10013
A group of mainly men sit around a table eating soup, chandeliers hang overhead. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Great NY Noodletown remains the quintessential late-night haunt in Chinatown, with its glowing yellow sign acting as a beacon in the after hours. All the Cantonese magic happens in the plain, utilitarian room where patrons feast on hacked-up roasted duck (on display at the counter), salted-baked flounder, and perhaps most famously, ginger scallion noodles, golden-hued and topped with hoisin for good measure.

28 Bowery
New York, NY 10013

14. Golden Steamer

143A Mott St, New York, NY 10013
Three pastries dramatically lit, including a yellow custard pie and roll with hot dog peeping out. Robert Sietsema/Eater

As the old-guard Cantonese coffee shops like Hop Shing have closed, where does one go for the baked and steamed bao, steamed dumplings, and rice noodle rolls that are one of Chinatown’s greatest treasures? Golden Steamer is a narrow stall resembles a spa steam room, except the shelves and cabinets are lined with farinaceous goodies, with fillings that run from savory to sweet, so it’s a great dessert spot, too. There’s no seating, however.

143A Mott St
New York, NY 10013

15. Bánh Mì Saigon

198 Grand St, New York, NY 10013
A bright banh mi sandwich seen in cross section with orange carrots, leafy deep green sprigs of cilantro, and layered meats. Robert Sietsema/Eater

The banh mi was invented in the 1950s, but it didn’t make its way to New York’s Chinatown until 1989, when Banh Mi Saigon moved into the back of a jewelry store on Mott Street. Eventually, it opened its own bakery around the corner on Grand Street, making its own light and crusty baguettes. Of the 13 sandwiches offered, the number one, with the cafe’s famous barbecued pork, is a good bet, but then so are the pork chop, curried chicken, and tofu versions. Don’t neglect the snacks either, including the giant shrimp crackers perfect for snacking.

198 Grand St
New York, NY 10013

Related Maps

16. Hwa Yuan Szechuan

42 E Broadway, New York, NY 10002
A glistening bowl of tofu with tendrils of meat and black beans. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Decades after it shut, famed Sichuan restaurant Hwa Yuan, founded by legendary chef Shorty Tang, reopened in 2017 in the same location, and the food is just as good according to Eater critic Robert Sietsema. The sesame noodles, spicy wine chicken, Tang’s amazing tofu, and double sautéed pork are some of the highlights in this glamorous, spacious destination that seats more than 160 people.

42 E Broadway
New York, NY 10002

17. Green Garden Village

216 Grand St, New York, NY 10013
Wontons rest on a nest of noodles framed by bok choy, with soup on the side. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Cantonese food has been enjoying a resurgence lately, even as other regional styles have washed over the neighborhood, and Green Garden Village is a prime example. It has a lush display of window charcuterie in an expanded array, as well an impressive seafood selection, though standards like wonton soup (in deconstructed form!) and beef chow fun hold their own. It’s also a great place for dim sum, especially for rice noodle rolls.

216 Grand St
New York, NY 10013

18. Yi Ji Shi Mo

88 Elizabeth St, New York, NY 10013
A cook scrapes steamed rice milk into a roll at Yi Ji Shi Mo.
A cook scrapes steamed rice milk into a roll at Yi Ji Shi Mo
Tony Lin/Eater

Amid the city’s booming cheung fun scene, which includes Guangdong import Yin Ji and Joe’s at Canal Street Market, Yi Ji Shi Mo easily ranks as one of the most intimate, adept, and fragrant purveyors. At this tiny storefront, located just below street level, a cook methodically and masterfully steams rice milk into firm, multi-layered noodles, sometimes laced with funky shrimp or sweet knobs of pork with chives. Eat them immediately.

88 Elizabeth St
New York, NY 10013

19. Friendship BBQ

103 Bowery, New York, NY 10002
A sesame seed coated skewer of meat in foreground, bowl of red skinned peanuts in background. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Flushing’s popular late-night street food spot opened this massive Manhattan outpost with just as large a menu. The 90-seat restaurant spotlights a variety of meat and vegetable skewers like lotus root slices, chicken heart, and cumin-dusted lamb. Grilled fish, hot pot, and a Chinese-style seafood boil with crawfish, crab, and shrimp are also on deck.

103 Bowery
New York, NY 10002

20. Wah Fung Fast Food

79 Chrystie St, New York, NY 10002
Chinese duck cut up over rice with green sauce on top. Robert Sietsema/Eater

It’s not uncommon to find lines snaking out the door at Wah Fung Fast Food, which serves some of the city’s most satisfying roasted meats in meal-sized portions. Most will be going for the slightly sweet roasted pork over rice, which sells out for customers arriving too late in the day. There’s nowhere to sit here — the space is narrow — so watch the staff expertly chop barbecued meats and toss them over rice, and then bring the meal home or to eat in the nearby park, when weather permits. Bring cash.

79 Chrystie St
New York, NY 10002

21. King’s Kitchen

92 E Broadway, New York, NY 10002
Read Review |
A clay pot filled with rice and eel
Eel bo zai fan
Paul Crispin Quitoriano/Eater

Head to this Hong Kong-style restaurant for Cantonese barbecued meats like duck served over rice, noodle stir-fries like beef chow fun and “super-wonderful” steamed rice rolls. The restaurant opens at 7 a.m., so feel free to stop by for a bowl of congee in the morning, or what Eater critic Robert Sietsema calls “the world’s best breakfast.”

92 E Broadway
New York, NY 10002

22. Super Taste

26 Eldridge St, New York, NY 10002
A small storefront with glass windows and a red awning. Robert Sietsema/Eater

Hand-pulled noodles where introduced to NYC by Super Taste in 2005, when noodle master Steven Yan began serving the now popular carb. Over 10 years later, Super Taste remains one of the best locales for hand-pulled noodles in town. Scintillating add-ins range from oxtail to duck to cow stomach, but the house special, rich with beef, is the repeat favorite. An order of satisfying pork and chive pot stickers should accompany every bowl of noodles here.

26 Eldridge St
New York, NY 10002

23. Spicy Village

68 Forsyth St B, New York, NY 10002