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A street view of a restaurant, Nom Wah Tea Parlor exterior
Nom Wah Tea Parlor in Chinatown.
Noah Fecks

Where to Eat in Manhattan’s Chinatown

From fresh rice noodle rolls to dumplings galore, here’s where to eat in New York’s oldest and most famous Chinatown

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Nom Wah Tea Parlor in Chinatown.
| Noah Fecks

While there are plenty of New York City neighborhoods with stellar Chinese food, Manhattan’s Chinatown is still a leading destination for its diverse and flavorful cuisine. Cantonese fare and dim sum still predominate, though there are plenty of regional cuisines to be found, from Shanghainese to Teochew, plus some very good Vietnamese, Taiwanese, and Malaysian food. Soup dumplings, rice casseroles, noodles with or without gluten, stir fries, and fresh whole steamed fish — a signature of sorts — are in abundance in this historic neighborhood, with prices that run from very modest to very expensive. Ahead, the 26 top restaurants in Manhattan’s Chinatown for a nourishing and tasty snack or a proper feast.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

August Gatherings

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This establishment, whose name refers to harvest time in Guangdong, is an aggressively modern Chinese American restaurant helmed by chef Kenny Leung. The idea is mainly to merge traditional southern Chinese recipes with luxury ingredients like ribeye steak, truffles, Alaskan salmon, Berkshire pork, abalone, and caviar. The result is expensive, innovative, and delicious. Feast on dishes such as steak stir fried with papaya and marcona almonds, wagyu sirloin smothered in black truffle sauce (not truffle oil), and steamed chicken scattered with porcini mushrooms.

Chopped noodles of soft tofu thickly floating in a yellowish broth with mushrooms in an ornate bowl.
The house specialty of hard-to-make Wensi tofu soup with black mushrooms.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Uncle Lou

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Uncle Lou is one of several restaurants remaking Cantonese food in Chinatown, taking traditional recipes and kicking them up a notch with better ingredients and serving them ceremoniously on big round tables with turntables in the middle for easy sharing. Chef’s specials are called lo wah kiu (“the old timers”), and include steak cooked with chives, vegetarian tofu skin wraps, and homestyle chenpi duck, with sun-dried mandarin-orange-peel sauce.

A blue delft platter of sliced duck in a thick orange sauce.
Homestyle chenpi duck at Uncle Lou.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Fried Dumpling

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Hidden on an obscure steep side street in the heart of the oldest part of Chinatown, Fried Dumpling is a stall that revolutionized inexpensive eats when it opened in 1999 on the Lower East Side — though this is the only branch left. Pork pot stickers, stuffed with pork and chives and browned on the bottom, are the main attraction, though one can get vegetarian dumplings, sweet and sour soup, and warm soy milk, too. It’s a great place for a fortifying snack if you don’t want an entire meal.

A woman in a red jacket with a white paper hat serves dumplings to a line of customers
Fried Dumpling is really just a counter.
Gary He/Eater NY

Founded in 1938, Wo Hop is the second oldest restaurant in Chinatown. The old-guard Cantonese American menu remains largely intact (you’ll spot the handful of more modern dishes immediately), and this is one of the only restaurants in Chinatown where chop suey is to be found, along with chow mein and egg fu young. The walls of the subterranean space are lined with snapshots of happy patrons, including celebrities.

A glistening heap of fried noodles, chicken, and bean sprouts.
Chicken chow mein — not to be missed.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Cha Kee

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Chef Akiko Thurnauer melds traditional Cantonese and Japanese recipes that results in dishes that New Yorkers would be hard pressed to find anywhere else. Sake-steamed mussels, dan dan noodles crowned with an onsen egg, and sweet-and-sour pork, with jowl and belly as the preferred cuts, are just a few examples. The fusion-style cooking is refreshing in a part of town where Cantonese cooking is prominent, but Japanese options are few.

Ramen noodles in a blue and white ceramic bowl with a person lifting the noodles with chopsticks.
Dan dan noodles with a Japanese flourish at Cha Kee.
An Rong Xu/Eater NY

Peking Duck House

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Peking Duck House has long been a stop for celebrations, mainly for its large-format duck feasts and BYOB policy. Eating there is entertainment, too, with toque-wearing chefs slicing up whole ducks with perfectly crisp skins tableside. The restaurant, which also has a Midtown location, is a great option for larger groups, and also has a full Cantonese menu for duck-detesting diners.

An entire browned duck, including prominent head and neck.
A whole quacker carved tableside at Peking Duck House.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ping’s

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The Cantonese spot helmed by chef Chuen Ping Hui has been serving consistently fresh seafood since the mid-1990s — and was once a major attraction for food critics. It was also one of the first places to serve dim sum in the afternoon and on into the evening. Today, Eater critic Robert Sietsema recommends the Thai bass, a “perfectly prepared” steamed fish that’s caught and cooked on the spot; e-fu noodles with lobster; and Portuguese-style baked conch.

A long dining room with yellow paint on the wall juxtaposed with wooden panels. Several people are sitting at round tables.
One of several dining rooms at Ping’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Mee Sum Cafe

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This overlooked Chinatown tea shop dates back to the 1960s. It’s an old-school spot for inexpensive dim sum; servings of over-rice chicken, duck, or pork; and steaming bowls of congee. Diners can either sit at a counter or a few tables in the back of the parlor, or simply grab a leaf-wrapped bundle of sticky rice, known as joong, to go. Don’t miss the wonton soup.

A white bowl with a soup in it from within which yellow dumplings are seen peeking out along with leafy greens.
Classic wonton soup from old timer Mee Sum Cafe.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Nom Wah Tea Parlor

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Born as a tea parlor and bakery nearly a century ago, but revived not long ago by Wilson Tang, Nom Wah remains a thriving staple of the New York dim sum world. Prospective patrons often wait outside on Doyers until they’re called and given a seat in the dining room, which channels a packed 1950s diner. Menu highlights include fluffy pork buns, taro cakes, shrimp shumai, and rice noodle rolls with a number of fillings. Check off your choices on the ticket handed over when you’re seated. 

A chef hustles in the foreground as a knot of customers wait in the background on a darkened Doyers Alley.
Customers wait to get into Nom Wah.
Gary He/Eater NY

The Original Chinatown Ice Cream Factory

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Follow up a visit to any of the restaurants on this list with dessert at this petite ice cream shop that’s one of New York’s oldest and very best. Speciality flavors like black sesame, lychee, and a highly nutty zen butter — that’s peanut butter ice cream with toasted sesame seeds — shouldn’t be missed, though the fluffy texture is lovely with vanilla and strawberry as well. Any flavor can be packed in a pint and taken home.

Three yellow cups with green, orange, and blue colored ice cream in them. Each of them have two spoons in them as well.
Colorful flavors of ice cream from Chinatown Ice Cream Factory.
Gary He/Eater NY

Taiwan Pork Chop House

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Yes, there’s a lengthy menu running to typical Cantonese, a few Sichuan, and bedrock Taiwanese fare, but most diners sit down to one of the two specialties of the house, offered with abundant quantities of rice and pickled mustard greens. It can be a difficult decision to choose: the epic, thin-cut pork chops with a sweet glaze, or the bulbous chicken leg, briny and delicious? Both are equally good.

A pile of pork chops on rice in a round black plastic container.
Pork chops at Taiwan Pork Chop House.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles

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A few steps away from Nom Wah is this noodle purveyor with its numerous noodle options, many handmade on the premises. Styles vary — the kind of noodle, toppings, and whether it arrives pan-fried or in a soup — but it’s difficult to land on a bowl that’s not a winner. Go for the thicker and wider noodle options, and don’t miss the pan-fried pork dumplings, often better than what’s found at some of the specialty dumpling shops.

A bowl of thick noodles in soup with a fried egg on top.
Hand pulled noodles in soup at Tasty Hand-Pulled.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Mott Street Eatery

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Mott Street Eatery is really a series of food vendors — in fact, since it opened last November, it’s become mobbed as Chinatown’s first Flushing-style Chinese food court. The anchor is 89 Eatery, reversing the numbers of the address and serving the standard dim sum menu of dumplings, congee, and more kinds of lap mei (preserved ducks, chickens, and pig) than usual. Other stalls sell sushi; Hong Kong cakes, yogurt, and coffee; fancy burgers and lobster pizza; and Taiwanese specialties.

A dramatically lit facade in yellow and red with a wheelchair ramp on the side.
Mott Street Eatery appeared last November with a dozen or so dining choices.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Golden Steamer

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As the old-guard Cantonese coffee shops like Hop Shing have closed, where does one go for the baked and steamed bao, steamed dumplings, and rice noodle rolls that are one of Chinatown’s greatest treasures? Golden Steamer is a narrow stall resembling a steam room in a spa, except the shelves and cabinets are lined with farinaceous treats, with fillings that run from savory to sweet, so it’s a great dessert spot, too. There’s no seating, however.

Three pastries dramatically lit, including a yellow custard pie and roll with hot dog peeping out.
Assorted pastries at Golden Steamer.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Banh Mì Saigon

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The banh mi was invented in the 1950s, but it didn’t make its way to New York’s Chinatown until 1989, when Banh Mi Saigon moved into the back of a jewelry store on Mott Street. Eventually, the place opened its own bakery around the corner on Grand Street, making light and crusty baguettes. Of the dozen or so sandwiches offered, the “number one,” with the cafe’s famous barbecued pork, is a good bet, but then so are the pork chop, curried chicken, and tofu versions. Don’t neglect the snacks either, including the giant shrimp crackers, perfect for snacking.

A bright banh mi sandwich seen in cross section with orange carrots, leafy deep green sprigs of cilantro, and layered meats.
Banh Mi #1 with barbecued pork at Banh Mi Saigon.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Green Garden Village

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Cantonese food has been enjoying a resurgence lately, even as other regional styles have washed over the neighborhood, and Green Garden Village is a prime example. It has a lush display of preserved ducks and other cured meats in the window, as well an impressive seafood selection, though standards like wonton soup (in deconstructed form) and beef chow fun hold their own. It’s also a great place for dim sum, especially for rice noodle rolls.

Wontons rest on a nest of noodles framed by bok choy, with soup on the side.
Green Garden Village’s deconstructed wonton noodle soup.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Joe's Shanghai

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The latest edition of Joe’s Shanghai is on Bowery, around the corner from the first Chinatown branch on Pell, and it occupies a much grander space, with multiple dining rooms arranged around a central carryout counter. The soup dumplings — first popularized in the city in the ’90s at the original branch in Flushing — are as good as ever, served with or without a lump of crab added to the pork, eight to a giant steamer. Other Shanghai delights include braised gluten, eel with chives, and fish fingers with seaweed.

Eight puckered dumplings in a round bamboo steamer.
Crab and pork soup dumplings at Joe’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Wah Fung Fast Food

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It’s common to find long lines snaking out the door at Wah Fung Fast Food, which serves some of the city’s most satisfying roasted meats and poultry in meal-sized portions. Most will order the slightly sweet char siu pork over rice, which sells out for customers arriving too late in the day. There’s nowhere to sit here — the space is narrow — so watch the staff expertly chop barbecued meats and toss them over rice, and then bring the meal home or to eat in the nearby park. Bring cash.

Chinese duck cut up over rice with green sauce on top.
Roast duck with ginger scallion sauce at Wah Fung.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Kitchen Cô Út

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This offshoot of a respected banh mi shop, named after its chef Cô Út, offers a pretty standard Mekong Delta-inspired menu with a few dishes from Hue in central Vietnam added in. Sure the pho bo and pho ga (chicken pho) are good, but seek out some of the more obscure dishes on the menu, such as its signature tapioca dumplings steamed in banana leaves (bahn bot loc) and the bun bo Hue, a soup with all sorts of variety meats in its depths.

Six oblong glistening translucent dumplings.
Tapioca dumplings from Hue at Kitchen Cô Út are filled with shrimp and pork.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

King’s Kitchen

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Head to this Hong Kong-style restaurant for Cantonese barbecued meats like duck served over rice, noodle stir fries like beef chow fun, and “super-wonderful” rice noodle rolls. The restaurant opens at 7 a.m., so feel free to stop by for a bowl of congee in the morning, or what Eater critic Robert Sietsema calls “the world’s best breakfast.”

A clay pot filled with rice and eel.
Eel bo zai fan at King’s Kitchen.
Paul Crispin Quitoriano/Eater NY

Super Taste

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Hand-pulled noodles where introduced to NYC by Super Taste in 2005, when noodle master Steven Yan began serving them. Seventeen years later, Super Taste remains one of the best locales for hand-pulled noodles in town. Scintillating add-ins range from oxtail to duck to cow stomach, but the house special, rich with beef, is the repeat favorite. An order of satisfying pork-and-chive pot stickers should accompany every bowl of noodles here.

A small storefront with glass windows and a red awning.
Super Taste specializes in hand-pulled noodles.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Spicy Village

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Wendy Lian and Ren Fu Li’s gem of a Forsyth Street restaurant is a temple to a spectacular dish: big tray spicy chicken (da pan ji). The preparation involves dousing thick, hand-pulled noodles in a stew of chicken, garlic, potatoes, cumin, chiles, and star anise. With the capacity to feed at least two, the feast ranks as one of the city’s best large-format deals. Also go for a pork pancake, where stewed pork comes in sandwich form as a must-get appetizer. Spicy Village is BYOB.

A big metal bowl with stewed chicken and noodles, topped with a pile of cilantro
“Big tray chicken” at Spicy Village.
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Hwa Yuan Szechuan

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This multi-story grand palace of Sichuan food, anomalously located on a barren stretch of East Broadway, is a living tribute to Shorty Tang, the Taiwanese-born chef who popularized Sichuan food in Chinatown and invented cold sesame noodles as we know them. Seafood pan fried noodles, kung pao chicken, and Tang’s amazing tofu — flavored with fermented black beans — are also recommended.

A tangle of pale yellow noodles in a white bowl with a trickle of thin brown sauce.
Shorty Tang’s cold sesame noodles.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Harper’s Bread House

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The decades-old institution remains one of Chinatown’s top bakeries, a place for ultra-affordable Chinese pastries. Hot dog scallion buns are always a smart move, as are the freshly made onigiri rice balls. But the chief draw is a warm egg tart (dan tat), filled with custard dense with the richness of egg yolks and with the top bruleed for a Portuguese-style treat. Also, look out for the ham-and-omelet breakfast sandwich.

Colorful signs line the windows at the entrance to Harper’s Bread House
The entrance to Harper’s Bread House.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ming's Caffe

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Over the Essex F train stop on the Lower East Side, Ming’s Caffe is a gloriously casual place that serves an inexpensive Hong Kong menu to immigrants, artists, and scenesters. Some go for the dim sum, which is comparable to any if the better spots in the neighborhood, while others prefer the almost-Western-style breakfasts, like macaroni with spam and egg or toast smeared with condensed milk. Noodle soups and stir fries round out the menu.

Three browned patties share the plate with broccoli and a dab of thick dark brown sauce.
The superb homemade fish cake, Hong Kong style, at Ming’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Wu's Wonton King

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Though a relatively new addition to the Cantonese restaurants in New York — it opened in 2016 — Wu’s is an old-school counterpoint to the restaurants that surround it on the Lower East Side. The crispy garlic chicken is popular here and so is the whole fried flounder littered with scallions. Other favorites include the char siu buns, shrimp and egg scramble, and crab lo mein. The festive Wu’s has garnered a wine crowd for its welcoming BYOB policy.

Several plates of Chinese food including shrimp with scrambled eggs, roast duck, and steamed greens.
A selection of dishes from Wu’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

August Gatherings

Chopped noodles of soft tofu thickly floating in a yellowish broth with mushrooms in an ornate bowl.
The house specialty of hard-to-make Wensi tofu soup with black mushrooms.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This establishment, whose name refers to harvest time in Guangdong, is an aggressively modern Chinese American restaurant helmed by chef Kenny Leung. The idea is mainly to merge traditional southern Chinese recipes with luxury ingredients like ribeye steak, truffles, Alaskan salmon, Berkshire pork, abalone, and caviar. The result is expensive, innovative, and delicious. Feast on dishes such as steak stir fried with papaya and marcona almonds, wagyu sirloin smothered in black truffle sauce (not truffle oil), and steamed chicken scattered with porcini mushrooms.

Chopped noodles of soft tofu thickly floating in a yellowish broth with mushrooms in an ornate bowl.
The house specialty of hard-to-make Wensi tofu soup with black mushrooms.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Uncle Lou

A blue delft platter of sliced duck in a thick orange sauce.
Homestyle chenpi duck at Uncle Lou.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Uncle Lou is one of several restaurants remaking Cantonese food in Chinatown, taking traditional recipes and kicking them up a notch with better ingredients and serving them ceremoniously on big round tables with turntables in the middle for easy sharing. Chef’s specials are called lo wah kiu (“the old timers”), and include steak cooked with chives, vegetarian tofu skin wraps, and homestyle chenpi duck, with sun-dried mandarin-orange-peel sauce.

A blue delft platter of sliced duck in a thick orange sauce.
Homestyle chenpi duck at Uncle Lou.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Fried Dumpling

A woman in a red jacket with a white paper hat serves dumplings to a line of customers
Fried Dumpling is really just a counter.
Gary He/Eater NY

Hidden on an obscure steep side street in the heart of the oldest part of Chinatown, Fried Dumpling is a stall that revolutionized inexpensive eats when it opened in 1999 on the Lower East Side — though this is the only branch left. Pork pot stickers, stuffed with pork and chives and browned on the bottom, are the main attraction, though one can get vegetarian dumplings, sweet and sour soup, and warm soy milk, too. It’s a great place for a fortifying snack if you don’t want an entire meal.

A woman in a red jacket with a white paper hat serves dumplings to a line of customers
Fried Dumpling is really just a counter.
Gary He/Eater NY

Wo Hop

A glistening heap of fried noodles, chicken, and bean sprouts.
Chicken chow mein — not to be missed.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Founded in 1938, Wo Hop is the second oldest restaurant in Chinatown. The old-guard Cantonese American menu remains largely intact (you’ll spot the handful of more modern dishes immediately), and this is one of the only restaurants in Chinatown where chop suey is to be found, along with chow mein and egg fu young. The walls of the subterranean space are lined with snapshots of happy patrons, including celebrities.

A glistening heap of fried noodles, chicken, and bean sprouts.
Chicken chow mein — not to be missed.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Cha Kee

Ramen noodles in a blue and white ceramic bowl with a person lifting the noodles with chopsticks.
Dan dan noodles with a Japanese flourish at Cha Kee.
An Rong Xu/Eater NY

Chef Akiko Thurnauer melds traditional Cantonese and Japanese recipes that results in dishes that New Yorkers would be hard pressed to find anywhere else. Sake-steamed mussels, dan dan noodles crowned with an onsen egg, and sweet-and-sour pork, with jowl and belly as the preferred cuts, are just a few examples. The fusion-style cooking is refreshing in a part of town where Cantonese cooking is prominent, but Japanese options are few.

Ramen noodles in a blue and white ceramic bowl with a person lifting the noodles with chopsticks.
Dan dan noodles with a Japanese flourish at Cha Kee.
An Rong Xu/Eater NY

Peking Duck House

An entire browned duck, including prominent head and neck.
A whole quacker carved tableside at Peking Duck House.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Peking Duck House has long been a stop for celebrations, mainly for its large-format duck feasts and BYOB policy. Eating there is entertainment, too, with toque-wearing chefs slicing up whole ducks with perfectly crisp skins tableside. The restaurant, which also has a Midtown location, is a great option for larger groups, and also has a full Cantonese menu for duck-detesting diners.

An entire browned duck, including prominent head and neck.
A whole quacker carved tableside at Peking Duck House.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ping’s

A long dining room with yellow paint on the wall juxtaposed with wooden panels. Several people are sitting at round tables.
One of several dining rooms at Ping’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Cantonese spot helmed by chef Chuen Ping Hui has been serving consistently fresh seafood since the mid-1990s — and was once a major attraction for food critics. It was also one of the first places to serve dim sum in the afternoon and on into the evening. Today, Eater critic Robert Sietsema recommends the Thai bass, a “perfectly prepared” steamed fish that’s caught and cooked on the spot; e-fu noodles with lobster; and Portuguese-style baked conch.