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Medium rare prime rib on a white plate with creamed spinach in the background.
The prime rib from Smith & Wollensky
Nick Solares/Eater

The Classic Steakhouses of New York City

NYC steakhouses — old-school and newer, more casual spots — are still going strong

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The prime rib from Smith & Wollensky
| Nick Solares/Eater

Perhaps next to dollar-slice pizza joints and bagel shops, the New York steakhouse is up there among the city’s archetypal dining experiences. For many diners, it’s a night out when a medium-rare steak paired with a side of creamed spinach and glasses of red wine are on the agenda. There are plenty of old-school American fine dining establishments, but these days, there are more casual and affordable options as well. From Midtown to Brooklyn, beloved classics and newer spots offer up options for every kind of steakhouse experience.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Gallaghers Steakhouse

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228 W 52nd St
New York, NY 10019
(212) 586-5000
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This legendary NYC restaurant first opened as a speakeasy in 1927 — truly a Prohibition-era bar that didn’t turn into a steakhouse until the 1930s. Long Island-born restaurateur Dean Poll bought it in 2013 and revamped it shortly after. Still, he maintained the restaurant’s meat cooler that can be spotted from the street, one of the rare steakhouse dry-aging rooms still available for public view. It’s also one of the few steakhouses in the city to grill over charcoal.

Cuts of dry-aged meat line the shelves of a walk-in refrigerator at Gallaghers Steakhouse in Midtown
Gallaghers Steakhouse
Gallaghers [Official]

2. Frankie & Johnnie's Steakhouse

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320 W 46th St
New York, NY 10036
(212) 997-9494
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First opened in 1926, Frankie and Johnnie’s is a staple whose original location started as a speakeasy and is one of the Theatre District’s longest surviving restaurants. It moved one block north in 2015 and now boasts three locations total, including one in Westchester.

An aerial photograph of plates of steak, broccoli, spinach dip, and thick-cut potato chips
Frankie & Johnnie’s
Frankie & Johnnie’s [Official]

3. Smith & Wollensky

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797 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 753-1530
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This Midtown East steakhouse dates back to 1977 and remains one of the most consistent and celebrated beef houses in the city, even as it’s grown into a chain. It offers a classic, refined look and still delivers on a finely cooked dry-aged steak. Colorado rib steak is a signature dish, and the prime rib, pictured here, ranks as one of New York’s best.

Medium rare prime rib on a white plate with creamed spinach in the background.
The prime rib from Smith & Wollensky
Nick Solares/Eater

4. Bobby Van’s

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230 Park Ave
New York, NY 10169
(212) 867-5490
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This first Manhattan location of Bobby Van’s opened in 1996, but the original in Bridgehampton dates to 1969. Although Bobby Van’s is now a chain, the restaurant named for its original late owner and piano player nonetheless succeeds at steakhouse classics like shrimp cocktail, a 28-day dry-aged porterhouse, and creamed spinach. Businesspeople frequent the dining room at Bobby Van’s, which is bedecked in warm mahogany wood and white tablecloths.

A high-ceilinged, naturally-lit dining room with table cloths, high ceilings, and dark wood chairs. To the left, a sign on the restaurant’s window reads “Bobby Van’s” in capital letters.
The Bobby Van’s on Park Avenue
Bobby Van’s [Official]

5. Sparks Steak House

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210 E 46th St
New York, NY 10017
(212) 687-4855
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Sparks first opened in 1966 and moved to its current location in the ’70s. It’s famous for being the site where Gambino family mobster Paul “Big Paul” Castellano was killed in 1985 — a detail that owner Michael Cetta has called part of the restaurant’s mystique. Sparks is also one of the highest-grossing independent restaurants in the country.

Sparks Steak House
Rectangular and circular photos of trees line the walls of this ornate dining room. Three rows of tables are covered in tablecloths, set with glassware, and surrounded by black chairs.
Nick Solares/Eater

6. Keens Steakhouse

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72 W 36th St
New York, NY 10018
(212) 947-3636
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Keens is packed with history, and not just because it opened back in 1885. This Midtown steakhouse used to be home to a famous theatre and literary group, and after that, it was home to a pipe club. Dozens of pipes still line the restaurant, giving it a warm, unique vibe unlike any other restaurant in the city. The signature order here is the mutton chop, and a pro-move is to ask to pick from the bar menu, where a smaller portion of the mutton chop is available, as well as a formidable prime rib hash.

A mutton chop on a white plate with salad, surrounded by a knife and fork on a white tableclothed table
The mutton chop at Keen’s Steakhouse
Nick Solares/Eater

7. Old Homestead Steakhouse

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56 9th Ave
New York, NY 10011
(212) 242-9040
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This Chelsea steakhouse dates back to 1868, making it one of the oldest steakhouses in the city. It’s recognizable from the outside by a giant neon sign and a sculpture of cow declaring that the restaurant is “the King of Beef.” It’s a classic that’s since been replicated in Las Vegas and Atlantic City.

A piece of rare prime rib sits on an oval plate between a fork and a steak knife. In the background, there are small plates of sides and a wine glass.
Old Homestead Steakhouse offers a 28-day, dry-aged rime rib dubbed the Empire Cut
Nick Solares/Eater

8. Wolfgang's Steakhouse

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409 Greenwich St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 925-0350
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Opened by Wolfgang Zwiener after decades as a server at Peter Luger, Wolfgang’s is now a global chain with its roots in NYC. Much is similar to Peter Luger here, including the thick-cut bacon appetizer, sizzling porterhouse, and whipped cream “shlag” for dessert. The location, though, is a closer to Wall Street, meaning it’s usually full of the finance crowd.

A small red plastic cow is stuck into a porterhouse steak at Wolfgang’s Steakhouse
The porterhouse at Wolfgang’s
Wolfgang’s [Official]

9. Peter Luger Steak House

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178 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 387-7400
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All the steakhouses on this list are classics, but Peter Luger is probably the most quintessential version of a New York City steakhouse. The South Williamsburg restaurant has drawn people from across the five boroughs since it opened in 1887, and some say it’s the best version of a steakhouse in the world. The dry-aged porterhouse, which arrives with a sizzle, is the flagship dish, and the bacon and lunch-only burger are famously charming, too. Not everyone’s so sure, though. In October 2019, Times critic Pete Wells gave the Williamsburg steakhouse a brutal zero-star review for its “inconsistency.”

The Peter Luger porterhouse, cooked medium rare and displayed on a white plate
The porterhouse at Peter Luger
Nick Solares/Eater

10. St. Anselm

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355 Metropolitan Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 384-5054
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St. Anselm bucked all the tropes of a classic NYC steakhouse: A formal dining room with white table clothes, pricey wine lists, and most of all, break-the-bank-account steaks. About a decade ago, the butcher steak was $15 (it’s $28 now) and that very reasonable price still lures diners to line up these days.

A steak at St. Anselm
St. Anselm’s steak has been popular for years.
Michael Parrella/St. Anselm

11. Porter House Bar and Grill

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10 Columbus Cir
New York, NY 10019
(212) 823-9500
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The porter house stands up to the name of this Columbus Circle restaurant, but it’s not the only cut of beef or dish to order (consider the roasted bone marrow, veal chop, or aged prime beef burger). While the menu isn’t particularly innovative, the American classics are well executed, and chef Michael Lomonaco’s elegant dining room boasts some of the best Central Park views around.

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1. Gallaghers Steakhouse

228 W 52nd St, New York, NY 10019
Cuts of dry-aged meat line the shelves of a walk-in refrigerator at Gallaghers Steakhouse in Midtown
Gallaghers Steakhouse
Gallaghers [Official]

This legendary NYC restaurant first opened as a speakeasy in 1927 — truly a Prohibition-era bar that didn’t turn into a steakhouse until the 1930s. Long Island-born restaurateur Dean Poll bought it in 2013 and revamped it shortly after. Still, he maintained the restaurant’s meat cooler that can be spotted from the street, one of the rare steakhouse dry-aging rooms still available for public view. It’s also one of the few steakhouses in the city to grill over charcoal.

228 W 52nd St
New York, NY 10019

2. Frankie & Johnnie's Steakhouse

320 W 46th St, New York, NY 10036
An aerial photograph of plates of steak, broccoli, spinach dip, and thick-cut potato chips
Frankie & Johnnie’s
Frankie & Johnnie’s [Official]

First opened in 1926, Frankie and Johnnie’s is a staple whose original location started as a speakeasy and is one of the Theatre District’s longest surviving restaurants. It moved one block north in 2015 and now boasts three locations total, including one in Westchester.

320 W 46th St
New York, NY 10036

3. Smith & Wollensky

797 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10022
Medium rare prime rib on a white plate with creamed spinach in the background.
The prime rib from Smith & Wollensky
Nick Solares/Eater

This Midtown East steakhouse dates back to 1977 and remains one of the most consistent and celebrated beef houses in the city, even as it’s grown into a chain. It offers a classic, refined look and still delivers on a finely cooked dry-aged steak. Colorado rib steak is a signature dish, and the prime rib, pictured here, ranks as one of New York’s best.

797 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10022

4. Bobby Van’s

230 Park Ave, New York, NY 10169
A high-ceilinged, naturally-lit dining room with table cloths, high ceilings, and dark wood chairs. To the left, a sign on the restaurant’s window reads “Bobby Van’s” in capital letters.
The Bobby Van’s on Park Avenue
Bobby Van’s [Official]

This first Manhattan location of Bobby Van’s opened in 1996, but the original in Bridgehampton dates to 1969. Although Bobby Van’s is now a chain, the restaurant named for its original late owner and piano player nonetheless succeeds at steakhouse classics like shrimp cocktail, a 28-day dry-aged porterhouse, and creamed spinach. Businesspeople frequent the dining room at Bobby Van’s, which is bedecked in warm mahogany wood and white tablecloths.

230 Park Ave
New York, NY 10169

5. Sparks Steak House

210 E 46th St, New York, NY 10017
Sparks Steak House
Rectangular and circular photos of trees line the walls of this ornate dining room. Three rows of tables are covered in tablecloths, set with glassware, and surrounded by black chairs.
Nick Solares/Eater

Sparks first opened in 1966 and moved to its current location in the ’70s. It’s famous for being the site where Gambino family mobster Paul “Big Paul” Castellano was killed in 1985 — a detail that owner Michael Cetta has called part of the restaurant’s mystique. Sparks is also one of the highest-grossing independent restaurants in the country.

210 E 46th St
New York, NY 10017

6. Keens Steakhouse

72 W 36th St, New York, NY 10018
A mutton chop on a white plate with salad, surrounded by a knife and fork on a white tableclothed table
The mutton chop at Keen’s Steakhouse
Nick Solares/Eater

Keens is packed with history, and not just because it opened back in 1885. This Midtown steakhouse used to be home to a famous theatre and literary group, and after that, it was home to a pipe club. Dozens of pipes still line the restaurant, giving it a warm, unique vibe unlike any other restaurant in the city. The signature order here is the mutton chop, and a pro-move is to ask to pick from the bar menu, where a smaller portion of the mutton chop is available, as well as a formidable prime rib hash.

72 W 36th St
New York, NY 10018

7. Old Homestead Steakhouse

56 9th Ave, New York, NY 10011
A piece of rare prime rib sits on an oval plate between a fork and a steak knife. In the background, there are small plates of sides and a wine glass.
Old Homestead Steakhouse offers a 28-day, dry-aged rime rib dubbed the Empire Cut
Nick Solares/Eater

This Chelsea steakhouse dates back to 1868, making it one of the oldest steakhouses in the city. It’s recognizable from the outside by a giant neon sign and a sculpture of cow declaring that the restaurant is “the King of Beef.” It’s a classic that’s since been replicated in Las Vegas and Atlantic City.

56 9th Ave
New York, NY 10011

8. Wolfgang's Steakhouse

409 Greenwich St, New York, NY 10013
A small red plastic cow is stuck into a porterhouse steak at Wolfgang’s Steakhouse
The porterhouse at Wolfgang’s
Wolfgang’s [Official]

Opened by Wolfgang Zwiener after decades as a server at Peter Luger, Wolfgang’s is now a global chain with its roots in NYC. Much is similar to Peter Luger here, including the thick-cut bacon appetizer, sizzling porterhouse, and whipped cream “shlag” for dessert. The location, though, is a closer to Wall Street, meaning it’s usually full of the finance crowd.

409 Greenwich St
New York, NY 10013

9. Peter Luger Steak House

178 Broadway, Brooklyn, NY 11211
The Peter Luger porterhouse, cooked medium rare and displayed on a white plate
The porterhouse at Peter Luger
Nick Solares/Eater

All the steakhouses on this list are classics, but Peter Luger is probably the most quintessential version of a New York City steakhouse. The South Williamsburg restaurant has drawn people from across the five boroughs since it opened in 1887, and some say it’s the best version of a steakhouse in the world. The dry-aged porterhouse, which arrives with a sizzle, is the flagship dish, and the bacon and lunch-only burger are famously charming, too. Not everyone’s so sure, though. In October 2019, Times critic Pete Wells gave the Williamsburg steakhouse a brutal zero-star review for its “inconsistency.”

178 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY 11211

10. St. Anselm

355 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211
A steak at St. Anselm
St. Anselm’s steak has been popular for years.
Michael Parrella/St. Anselm

St. Anselm bucked all the tropes of a classic NYC steakhouse: A formal dining room with white table clothes, pricey wine lists, and most of all, break-the-bank-account steaks. About a decade ago, the butcher steak was $15 (it’s $28 now) and that very reasonable price still lures diners to line up these days.

355 Metropolitan Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211

11. Porter House Bar and Grill

10 Columbus Cir, New York, NY 10019

The porter house stands up to the name of this Columbus Circle restaurant, but it’s not the only cut of beef or dish to order (consider the roasted bone marrow, veal chop, or aged prime beef burger). While the menu isn’t particularly innovative, the American classics are well executed, and chef Michael Lomonaco’s elegant dining room boasts some of the best Central Park views around.

10 Columbus Cir
New York, NY 10019

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