clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Slices of steak on a white plate with a floral design
St. Anselm is one of Brooklyn’s top steakhouses.
Michael Parrella/St. Anselm

14 Great New York City Steakhouses

Old and new options for quality cuts of meat

View as Map
St. Anselm is one of Brooklyn’s top steakhouses.
| Michael Parrella/St. Anselm

Perhaps next to dollar-slice pizza joints and bagel shops, the New York steakhouse is up there among the city’s archetypal dining experiences. For many diners, it’s a night out when a medium-rare steak paired with a side of creamed spinach and glasses of red wine or martinis are on the agenda. From Midtown to Williamsburg, beloved classics and newer spots offer up options for every kind of steakhouse experience.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

Read More
If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Gallaghers Steakhouse

Copy Link

This legendary restaurant started as a speakeasy in 1927, a true Prohibition-era bar that didn’t turn into a steakhouse until the 1930s. Long Island-born restaurateur Dean Poll bought it in 2013 and revamped it shortly after. Still, he maintained the restaurant’s meat cooler that can be spotted from the street, one of the rare steakhouse dry-aging rooms still available for public viewing. Start off with the bacon-studded clams casino, then pair a funky dry-aged ribeye with fries and a wedge salad drenched in blue cheese. Call ahead for the prime rib, one of the city’s best.

Cuts of dry-aged meat line the shelves of a walk-in refrigerator at Gallaghers Steakhouse in Midtown
The dry-aging room at Gallaghers.
Gallaghers

Churrascaria Plataforma

Copy Link

This Brazilian steakhouse features servers waltzing table to table, wielding long spits of meat sliced tableside. Diners pay a fixed price for a varied selection of unlimited steak, sausages, and other grilled meats, plus sides that run from rice and beans to fried polenta and french fries. A salad bar is included in the price, stocked with greens, veggies, and creamy potato salad. Dessert and drinks aren’t included in the $80-per-person spread.

The Grill

Copy Link

Major Food Group’s elegant chophouse remains one of the city’s most posh places to eat beef, due in no small part to the landmark room by architects Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson. On a larger menu studded with caviar, gumbo, and Dover sole, the Grill offers a variety of steakhouse staples at premium prices. Expect Montauk oysters, littleneck clams, an excellent crab cake, roast prime ribs with deviled bones, big New York strips bigger porterhouses, and a variety of sides like hashed browns, cottage fries, and mashed potatoes.

A man in a white tuxedo stands behind the bar at the Grill, in front of a giant arrangement of pink and red flowers
The bar at the Grill.
Gary He/Eater NY

Le Marais

Copy Link

This classic French bistro and butcher shop in Midtown remains one of the city’s finest institutions for kosher beef. Among the notable selections include exceedingly tender beef jerky, buttery roast chicken, Uruguayan grass-fed entrecote (a boneless cut from the rib), and best of all, La Surprise, the $59 butcher’s cut.

Monterey NYC

Copy Link

Simon Oren, Dudi Sasson, and chef James Tracey are behind this art deco Midtown brasserie with a Miami-pink hue, where prime rib au jus is served tableside, along with sides like potato puree, cauliflower gratin, and broccolini or delicata squash. Other options include a 40-day dry-aged porterhouse, tenderloin, and a 30-day dry-aged strip.

The dining room at a Midtown restaurant that’s pink hued and filled with art deco accents and lights.
The dining room at Monterey Brasserie.
Monterey.

The Lambs Club

Copy Link

The Lambs Club offers views of the city with a menu of American classics, including standard chophouse selections like a dry-aged New York strip, filet mignon, wagyu skirt steak, cote de boeuf, and a porterhouse, all served with peppercorn sauce and the choice of a side.

The Lamb’s Club porterhouse surrounded by size.
The Lambs Club porterhouse.
Lamb’s Club

Keens Steakhouse

Copy Link

Keens is packed with history, and not just because it opened in 1885. This Midtown steakhouse used to be home to a famous theatre and literary group, and after that, a pipe club. Dozens of pipes still line the restaurant, giving it a warm, unique vibe not like any other restaurant in the city. The signature order here is the mutton chop. The restaurant also sells a smaller portion as a $29 as special.

A mutton chop on a white plate with salad, surrounded by a knife and fork on a white tableclothed table.
The legendary mutton chop at Keens.
Eater NY

Skirt Steak

Copy Link

Skirt steak is a bold choice for a menu focused around a single item, says Eater critic, Ryan Sutton, of Laurent Tourondel’s Chelsea spot that specializes in the cut. For now, it holds the title of the city’s least expensive steakhouse. The prix fixe menu is $39 (up from $28 when it first opened) and comes with a salad, bread, and endless fries. Sides and desserts can be procured from a trolley roaming through the dining room for $12 each.

Four patrons dine on skirt steak and a variety of sides, as depicted in this overhead diagonal shot
Fries are unlimited at Skirt Steak.
Skirt Steak

Chef David Shim and Simon Kim’s Michelin-starred hotspot occupies a particular niche in the city’s high-end beef scene: It’s a cross between a classic steakhouse and a Korean barbecue restaurant, decked out with comfy booths and dim lighting. The main event is a collection of four USDA Prime and American wagyu cuts priced at $68 per person, accompanied by banchan and classic sides like egg souffle, scallion salad, and kimchi stew. High rollers can order the $225 steak omakase with premium dry-aged cuts.

An overhead photograph of plates of banchan surrounding a Korean barbecue grill
Cote is a mix between a classic steakhouse and a Korean barbecue restaurant.
Gary He/Eater NY

Old Homestead Steakhouse

Copy Link

This Chelsea restaurant dates back to 1868, making it one of the oldest steakhouses in the city. It’s recognizable from the outside by a giant neon sign and a sculpture of a cow declaring that the restaurant is “the King of Beef.” It’s a classic that’s since been replicated in Las Vegas and Atlantic City.

A piece of rare prime rib sits on an oval plate between a fork and a steak knife. In the background, there are small plates of sides and a wine glass.
The Empire Cut, a 28-day, dry-aged prime rib.
Eater NY

Hawksmoor

Copy Link

This London-based chain instantly became one of the city’s better steakhouses when it opened in 2021. Non-beef selections are particularly well-curated, including a cocktail list that wouldn’t feel out of place at a chic speakeasy. Note that Hawksmoor, like, Gallaghers, is one of the few city venues to grill its dry-aged steaks over charcoals. One can easily order expensive rib eyes, filets, and strips, but the restaurant also offers a fine rump cut at just $36. Desserts, including the Meyer lemon meringue bomb, can merit a trip in their own right.

The charred rump steak sits on a white plate.
The rump steak at Hawksmoor.
Hawksmoor

Bowery Meat Company

Copy Link

Consider a three ounce wagyu for a small luxury, or if you’re a big spender, a porterhouse for two. The duck lasagna that can feed up to six is also popular, along with Wednesday prime rib night that’s $88 for meat and sides. Also? It’s a butcher shop.

Porterhouse for two.
Porterhouse for two.
Bowery Meat Company

St. Anselm

Copy Link

When St. Anselm opened in 2010, the Williamsburg restaurant bucked all the tropes of a classic New York City steakhouse: formal dining rooms, white tablecloths, expensive wine lists, and break-the-bank steaks. Several cuts of meat are priced by the pound, with a hanger steak and pork porterhouse priced around $30 each. The menu also lists less conventional steakhouse dishes, like swordfish, lamb saddle, and fish collars.

An overhead photograph of a medium rare steak topped with green onions.
St. Anselm’s steak has been popular for years.
Michael Parrella/St. Anselm

Gus's Chop House

Copy Link

Affordable cuts of meat and a true neighborhood vibe are the draws at Gus’s Chop House, which opened last fall on a secluded side street in Cobble Hill. Steaks start at $28, for a pork porterhouse, and work their way up to a $145 rib eye for two, with a handful of options priced around $30. In lieu of classic steakhouse sides, find sausage rolls, squid and chickpeas, plates of gnocchi, and beef curry buns.

A hand dunks a french fry into a white ramekin of sauce next to a burger resting on a plate.
The off-menu burger at Gus’s.
Teddy Wolff/Gus’s Chop House

Gallaghers Steakhouse

This legendary restaurant started as a speakeasy in 1927, a true Prohibition-era bar that didn’t turn into a steakhouse until the 1930s. Long Island-born restaurateur Dean Poll bought it in 2013 and revamped it shortly after. Still, he maintained the restaurant’s meat cooler that can be spotted from the street, one of the rare steakhouse dry-aging rooms still available for public viewing. Start off with the bacon-studded clams casino, then pair a funky dry-aged ribeye with fries and a wedge salad drenched in blue cheese. Call ahead for the prime rib, one of the city’s best.

Cuts of dry-aged meat line the shelves of a walk-in refrigerator at Gallaghers Steakhouse in Midtown
The dry-aging room at Gallaghers.
Gallaghers

Churrascaria Plataforma

This Brazilian steakhouse features servers waltzing table to table, wielding long spits of meat sliced tableside. Diners pay a fixed price for a varied selection of unlimited steak, sausages, and other grilled meats, plus sides that run from rice and beans to fried polenta and french fries. A salad bar is included in the price, stocked with greens, veggies, and creamy potato salad. Dessert and drinks aren’t included in the $80-per-person spread.

The Grill

Major Food Group’s elegant chophouse remains one of the city’s most posh places to eat beef, due in no small part to the landmark room by architects Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson. On a larger menu studded with caviar, gumbo, and Dover sole, the Grill offers a variety of steakhouse staples at premium prices. Expect Montauk oysters, littleneck clams, an excellent crab cake, roast prime ribs with deviled bones, big New York strips bigger porterhouses, and a variety of sides like hashed browns, cottage fries, and mashed potatoes.

A man in a white tuxedo stands behind the bar at the Grill, in front of a giant arrangement of pink and red flowers
The bar at the Grill.
Gary He/Eater NY

Le Marais

This classic French bistro and butcher shop in Midtown remains one of the city’s finest institutions for kosher beef. Among the notable selections include exceedingly tender beef jerky, buttery roast chicken, Uruguayan grass-fed entrecote (a boneless cut from the rib), and best of all, La Surprise, the $59 butcher’s cut.

Monterey NYC

Simon Oren, Dudi Sasson, and chef James Tracey are behind this art deco Midtown brasserie with a Miami-pink hue, where prime rib au jus is served tableside, along with sides like potato puree, cauliflower gratin, and broccolini or delicata squash. Other options include a 40-day dry-aged porterhouse, tenderloin, and a 30-day dry-aged strip.

The dining room at a Midtown restaurant that’s pink hued and filled with art deco accents and lights.
The dining room at Monterey Brasserie.
Monterey.

The Lambs Club

The Lambs Club offers views of the city with a menu of American classics, including standard chophouse selections like a dry-aged New York strip, filet mignon, wagyu skirt steak, cote de boeuf, and a porterhouse, all served with peppercorn sauce and the choice of a side.

The Lamb’s Club porterhouse surrounded by size.
The Lambs Club porterhouse.
Lamb’s Club

Keens Steakhouse

Keens is packed with history, and not just because it opened in 1885. This Midtown steakhouse used to be home to a famous theatre and literary group, and after that, a pipe club. Dozens of pipes still line the restaurant, giving it a warm, unique vibe not like any other restaurant in the city. The signature order here is the mutton chop. The restaurant also sells a smaller portion as a $29 as special.

A mutton chop on a white plate with salad, surrounded by a knife and fork on a white tableclothed table.
The legendary mutton chop at Keens.
Eater NY

Skirt Steak

Skirt steak is a bold choice for a menu focused around a single item, says Eater critic, Ryan Sutton, of Laurent Tourondel’s Chelsea spot that specializes in the cut. For now, it holds the title of the city’s least expensive steakhouse. The prix fixe menu is $39 (up from $28 when it first opened) and comes with a salad, bread, and endless fries. Sides and desserts can be procured from a trolley roaming through the dining room for $12 each.

Four patrons dine on skirt steak and a variety of sides, as depicted in this overhead diagonal shot
Fries are unlimited at Skirt Steak.
Skirt Steak

Cote

Chef David Shim and Simon Kim’s Michelin-starred hotspot occupies a particular niche in the city’s high-end beef scene: It’s a cross between a classic steakhouse and a Korean barbecue restaurant, decked out with comfy booths and dim lighting. The main event is a collection of four USDA Prime and American wagyu cuts priced at $68 per person, accompanied by banchan and classic sides like egg souffle, scallion salad, and kimchi stew. High rollers can order the $225 steak omakase with premium dry-aged cuts.

An overhead photograph of plates of banchan surrounding a Korean barbecue grill
Cote is a mix between a classic steakhouse and a Korean barbecue restaurant.
Gary He/Eater NY

Old Homestead Steakhouse

This Chelsea restaurant dates back to 1868, making it one of the oldest steakhouses in the city. It’s recognizable from the outside by a giant neon sign and a sculpture of a cow declaring that the restaurant is “the King of Beef.” It’s a classic that’s since been replicated in Las Vegas and Atlantic City.

A piece of rare prime rib sits on an oval plate between a fork and a steak knife. In the background, there are small plates of sides and a wine glass.
The Empire Cut, a 28-day, dry-aged prime rib.
Eater NY

Hawksmoor

This London-based chain instantly became one of the city’s better steakhouses when it opened in 2021. Non-beef selections are particularly well-curated, including a cocktail list that wouldn’t feel out of place at a chic speakeasy. Note that Hawksmoor, like, Gallaghers, is one of the few city venues to grill its dry-aged steaks over charcoals. One can easily order expensive rib eyes, filets, and strips, but the restaurant also offers a fine rump cut at just $36. Desserts, including the Meyer lemon meringue bomb, can merit a trip in their own right.

The charred rump steak sits on a white plate.
The rump steak at Hawksmoor.
Hawksmoor

Bowery Meat Company

Consider a three ounce wagyu for a small luxury, or if you’re a big spender, a porterhouse for two. The duck lasagna that can feed up to six is also popular, along with Wednesday prime rib night that’s $88 for meat and sides. Also? It’s a butcher shop.

Porterhouse for two.
Porterhouse for two.
Bowery Meat Company

St. Anselm

When St. Anselm opened in 2010, the Williamsburg restaurant bucked all the tropes of a classic New York City steakhouse: formal dining rooms, white tablecloths, expensive wine lists, and break-the-bank steaks. Several cuts of meat are priced by the pound, with a hanger steak and pork porterhouse priced around $30 each. The menu also lists less conventional steakhouse dishes, like swordfish, lamb saddle, and fish collars.

An overhead photograph of a medium rare steak topped with green onions.
St. Anselm’s steak has been popular for years.
Michael Parrella/St. Anselm

Gus's Chop House

Affordable cuts of meat and a true neighborhood vibe are the draws at Gus’s Chop House, which opened last fall on a secluded side street in Cobble Hill. Steaks start at $28, for a pork porterhouse, and work their way up to a $145 rib eye for two, with a handful of options priced around $30. In lieu of classic steakhouse sides, find sausage rolls, squid and chickpeas, plates of gnocchi, and beef curry buns.

A hand dunks a french fry into a white ramekin of sauce next to a burger resting on a plate.
The off-menu burger at Gus’s.
Teddy Wolff/Gus’s Chop House

Related Maps