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Chile garlic sauce garnishes a seared slice of white tuna sushi.
Sushi On Me has brought its unorthodox omakase to Williamsburg.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

The 15 Hottest New Restaurants in Brooklyn, February 2023

A Mission-style burrito shop and a rowdy sushi omakase spot join the list this month

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Sushi On Me has brought its unorthodox omakase to Williamsburg.
| Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Eater editors get asked one question more than any other: Where should I eat right now? While many people still consider Manhattan the locus of New York’s dining scene, some neighborhoods in Brooklyn have become dining destinations in their own right. On this map, you’ll find the latest Brooklyn debuts drawing NYC’s dining obsessives.

New to the list in February: Baby Blues Luncheonette, a daytime diner in Williamsburg; Super Burrito, the second location for a Rockaway Beach burrito shop; and Sushi On Me, an unorthodox sushi counter where dinner comes with unlimited sake.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

For more New York dining recommendations, check out the new hotspots in Manhattan, Queens, and the Hamptons.

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Michael Solomonov is building a headquarters for his Philadelphia restaurants at the Williamsburg Hoxton Hotel. First up was grill house Laser Wolf, which opened on the rooftop in April, followed by an outpost of his bakery and cafe K’Far, at the basement level, in November. The pastel and plant-cloaked dining rooms make K’Far the kind of place that’s perfect for parents visiting from out of town or friends celebrating a night out. At brunch, look for pistachio sticky buns, olive omelets, and breakfast sandwiches on chewy Jerusalem bagels.

Sticky buns, borekasim, bagels, and more on a table.
Brunch is the move at K’Far.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Chino Grande

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If fighting over lobster french fries and singing karaoke sounds like a night well spent, Chino Grande might be for you. This Williamsburg restaurant from a co-owner of Win Son bills itself as a “karaoke saloon” — and even though singing is only permitted after 10 p.m. on weekdays, and 11 p.m. on weekends, the bar usually starts buzzing after sundown. Look out for a short menu of finger foods like swordfish skewers, five-spice pork ribs, and an order of $59 french fries topped with a whole lobster.

Hands dive in to pick up fries on a plate with a whole lobster on it.
A heap of french fries with lobster at Chino Grande.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Super Burrito

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At long last, Williamsburg has a burrito worth writing about. Okay, fine — Santa Fe’s breakfast burritos came first — but the new location of Super Burrito, which started with a stall on the Rockaway Beach boardwalk, fills a Mission-style-burrito-shaped hole in the neighborhood. Burritos are massive, stuffed with rice, beans, cheese, and salsa by default, and finished off with meats like carne asada and al pastor. Look out for specials, like the “dankwrap supreme,” a leveled-up version of Taco Bell’s Crunchwrap Supreme.

Two hands hold unwrapped burritos.
Burritos from Super Burrito in Rockaway Beach.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Sushi On Me

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Unhinged sushi spot Sushi on Me brought the party to Williamsburg last month. The unorthodox omakase, which launched out of a basement-level space in Jackson Heights in 2020, has stayed true to the original: Staff behind the bar keep sake glasses full, Japanese small plates are sometimes served in Thai curries, and for some reason, the whole restaurant smells like weed.

The $129 omakase includes 18 courses of sushi and sashimi, plus unlimited sake. Cash only.

Black caviar sits above a pink slab of fatty tuna sushi
Fatty tuna with caviar.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Baby Blues Luncheonette

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Diners as we knew them are something of an endangered species, and a new crop of daytime restaurants is helping to fill the void. There was MeMe’s in Prospect Heights before it closed, and Golden Diner in Two Bridges, which still serves some of the city’s best burgers and pancakes. Baby Blues Luncheonette is the latest, bringing a Greek spin, sort of, on the theme. The menu has everything you need, from an HLT sandwich (grilled halloumi, lettuce, tomato) to fig jam toast and baklava banana bread. Coffee is unlimited; closed Tuesdays.

A plate of eggs with halloumi.
Eggs with halloumi at Baby Blues Luncheonette.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Baby's Buns & Buckets

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Dekalb Market remains one of the best places to find actually interesting food hall fare. Case in point: Baby’s Buns and Buckets. The newer underground food stall specializes in Thai meats and seafoods that overflow from mini sandwiches or are loaded into buckets with rice, herbs, and onions. However you do it, expect reasonable prices and generous portions.

A filet sticks out of a small bun with lettuce and a green background.
Fried basa on a small brioche bun.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Oma Grassa

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Oma Grassa arrived in Fort Greene last summer, serving charred sourdough pies that might remind you of Ops in Bushwick, even if they’re baked in an electric oven. The half-dozen or so pizzas on the menu rotate in and out; look out for ones topped with curled pepperoni cups, mussels, and farmer's market vegetables. There’s not much more to the place than pizza, but look out for an antipasti plate or salad option on the menu.

A pepperoni pizza with lots of char along the edges.
A pepperoni pie gleams at Oma Grassa.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Slutty Vegan

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Meatless burger chain Slutty Vegan landed in Fort Greene this fall — and the Brooklyn neighborhood may never be the same. Employees stand out front of the restaurant calling customers “sluts” through branded megaphones, and lines continue to wind down Fulton Street on weekends. Whether the company’s branding makes you want to get in line or squirm in your seat, it can’t be denied: These vegan burgers have fans, and this first location in New York is just the beginning of larger expansion plans for the five boroughs.

A sea of customers with iPhones and cameras gathers out front of Slutty Vegan in Brooklyn, New York.
Slutty Vegan celebrated its grand opening with a block party last fall.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Bobbi’s Italian Beef

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Bobbi’s Italian Beef touched down in Cobble Hill last fall, bringing Chicago dogs, Italian beef sandwiches, and other foods from the Windy City to the neighborhood. The restaurant used to operate out of the Dekalb Market Hall in Downtown Brooklyn, but the standalone storefront has made way for more sandwiches — there are a baker’s dozen on the menu — and a 30-seat dining room. Order the Italian beef, marinated top round that’s sliced thin, tucked into a sandwich roll, then dunked in meat juices before serving.

A Chicago-style hot dog with a side of tater tots is served in a red basket with parchment paper.
A Chicago dog with celery salt tots.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Gus's Chop House

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Gus’s straddles the line between cool neighborhood hangout and family-friendly restaurant: There’s a full-length bathroom mirror for documenting your youth, but also a changing table for mourning it; a $30 steak for the masses, and a bo-bo chicken served with its head and feet still on for those with taste. This chophouse contains multitudes, and quality cuts of meat are the glue that holds it all together. Get there early and ask for the off-menu burger — a thick patty made from a blend of pork and beef that the restaurant makes a handful of each night.

A burger with onions and melty cheese sits on a plate at Gus’s Chop House.
The off-menu burger at Gus’s.
Gus’s Chop House/Teddy Wolff

Pecking House

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Pecking House, a fried chicken pop-up that once had a waitlist of almost 10,000 people, found a permanent home in Prospect Heights last year. The greatest hits from the restaurant’s two years on the road — chile fried chicken sandwiches, mapo tofu sloppy joes — are served here, along with new items like chicken salt french fries, canned beer, and cocktails. Don’t be deterred by the small crowds that amass here on weekends; things move quick at this fine-tuned, fast-casual spot.

A pair of tongs dips a piece of fried chicken into a vat of red sauce.
This chicken once had a 10,000-person waitlist.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Masalawala & Sons

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The team behind New York’s only Michelin-starred Indian restaurant is out with another hit, this time in Park Slope. Masalawala & Sons is the second coming for a restaurant the team used to run on the Lower East Side under a similar name, but the menu’s been revamped and now looks to bridge the gap between what’s eaten in Indian homes and what’s served in the city’s Indian restaurants. Keep an eye out for macher dim (a sac of fish roe that’s poached in curry) and daab chingri (tiger prawns served in a young coconut shell).

A close-up shot of red and orange sauce and food in a red clay bowl, garnished with shredded green herbs.
Macher dim, a sac of fish roe that’s poached in curry.
Adam Friedlander/Masalawala

Find Syrian and Korean food, but not Syrian Korean fusion, at this charming Windsor Terrace takeout counter with exactly one table parked out front. The prices and portions of dishes like the bulgogi “fat boy” — a barbecue beef burrito wrapped up in a greasy pancake — seem to defy inflation. Larger plates like chicken shawarma and bibimbap come with the choice of mezze (or banchan) and make for good sharing.

A person wearing a red sweater clutches a burrito overflowing with bulgogi.
The bulgogi “fat boy.”
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Kingfisher

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The sommelier André Hueston Mack has opened a small empire of restaurants in Prospect Lefferts Gardens in recent years. There’s the ham bar & Sons; a walk-up window dispensing breakfast tacos; and a bakery called Chickadee Bread. Kingfisher, a restaurant with an eye for seafood that opened last fall, is his sixth. Plates priced around $20 to $35 each include oysters, monkfish with crushed kettle chips, and a noteworthy shrimp cocktail.

Two razor clams sit atop a bowl.
Razor clams at Kingfisher.
Liz Clayman/Kingfisher

Fatta Mano

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Abdul Elenani, the owner of acclaimed Palestinian restaurants Ayat and Al Badawi, opened Fatto Mano last fall — one of few places in the city to serve Italian cuisine that’s also halal. The Bay Ridge restaurant is churning out mostly hits, Eater critic Robert Sietsema said in an early review: The chicken Milanese was as “massive” as he hoped, while the fettuccine Bolognese “tasted as if the noodles had been rolled and cut minutes before.” BYOB.

A blue bowl of wide noodles with an orange colored meat sauce.
The Bolognese at Fatta Mano.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

K'Far

Michael Solomonov is building a headquarters for his Philadelphia restaurants at the Williamsburg Hoxton Hotel. First up was grill house Laser Wolf, which opened on the rooftop in April, followed by an outpost of his bakery and cafe K’Far, at the basement level, in November. The pastel and plant-cloaked dining rooms make K’Far the kind of place that’s perfect for parents visiting from out of town or friends celebrating a night out. At brunch, look for pistachio sticky buns, olive omelets, and breakfast sandwiches on chewy Jerusalem bagels.

Sticky buns, borekasim, bagels, and more on a table.
Brunch is the move at K’Far.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Chino Grande

If fighting over lobster french fries and singing karaoke sounds like a night well spent, Chino Grande might be for you. This Williamsburg restaurant from a co-owner of Win Son bills itself as a “karaoke saloon” — and even though singing is only permitted after 10 p.m. on weekdays, and 11 p.m. on weekends, the bar usually starts buzzing after sundown. Look out for a short menu of finger foods like swordfish skewers, five-spice pork ribs, and an order of $59 french fries topped with a whole lobster.

Hands dive in to pick up fries on a plate with a whole lobster on it.
A heap of french fries with lobster at Chino Grande.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Super Burrito

At long last, Williamsburg has a burrito worth writing about. Okay, fine — Santa Fe’s breakfast burritos came first — but the new location of Super Burrito, which started with a stall on the Rockaway Beach boardwalk, fills a Mission-style-burrito-shaped hole in the neighborhood. Burritos are massive, stuffed with rice, beans, cheese, and salsa by default, and finished off with meats like carne asada and al pastor. Look out for specials, like the “dankwrap supreme,” a leveled-up version of Taco Bell’s Crunchwrap Supreme.

Two hands hold unwrapped burritos.
Burritos from Super Burrito in Rockaway Beach.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Sushi On Me

Unhinged sushi spot Sushi on Me brought the party to Williamsburg last month. The unorthodox omakase, which launched out of a basement-level space in Jackson Heights in 2020, has stayed true to the original: Staff behind the bar keep sake glasses full, Japanese small plates are sometimes served in Thai curries, and for some reason, the whole restaurant smells like weed.

The $129 omakase includes 18 courses of sushi and sashimi, plus unlimited sake. Cash only.

Black caviar sits above a pink slab of fatty tuna sushi
Fatty tuna with caviar.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Baby Blues Luncheonette

Diners as we knew them are something of an endangered species, and a new crop of daytime restaurants is helping to fill the void. There was MeMe’s in Prospect Heights before it closed, and Golden Diner in Two Bridges, which still serves some of the city’s best burgers and pancakes. Baby Blues Luncheonette is the latest, bringing a Greek spin, sort of, on the theme. The menu has everything you need, from an HLT sandwich (grilled halloumi, lettuce, tomato) to fig jam toast and baklava banana bread. Coffee is unlimited; closed Tuesdays.

A plate of eggs with halloumi.
Eggs with halloumi at Baby Blues Luncheonette.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Baby's Buns & Buckets

Dekalb Market remains one of the best places to find actually interesting food hall fare. Case in point: Baby’s Buns and Buckets. The newer underground food stall specializes in Thai meats and seafoods that overflow from mini sandwiches or are loaded into buckets with rice, herbs, and onions. However you do it, expect reasonable prices and generous portions.

A filet sticks out of a small bun with lettuce and a green background.
Fried basa on a small brioche bun.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Oma Grassa

Oma Grassa arrived in Fort Greene last summer, serving charred sourdough pies that might remind you of Ops in Bushwick, even if they’re baked in an electric oven. The half-dozen or so pizzas on the menu rotate in and out; look out for ones topped with curled pepperoni cups, mussels, and farmer's market vegetables. There’s not much more to the place than pizza, but look out for an antipasti plate or salad option on the menu.

A pepperoni pizza with lots of char along the edges.
A pepperoni pie gleams at Oma Grassa.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Slutty Vegan

Meatless burger chain Slutty Vegan landed in Fort Greene this fall — and the Brooklyn neighborhood may never be the same. Employees stand out front of the restaurant calling customers “sluts” through branded megaphones, and lines continue to wind down Fulton Street on weekends. Whether the company’s branding makes you want to get in line or squirm in your seat, it can’t be denied: These vegan burgers have fans, and this first location in New York is just the beginning of larger expansion plans for the five boroughs.

A sea of customers with iPhones and cameras gathers out front of Slutty Vegan in Brooklyn, New York.
Slutty Vegan celebrated its grand opening with a block party last fall.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Bobbi’s Italian Beef

Bobbi’s Italian Beef touched down in Cobble Hill last fall, bringing Chicago dogs, Italian beef sandwiches, and other foods from the Windy City to the neighborhood. The restaurant used to operate out of the Dekalb Market Hall in Downtown Brooklyn, but the standalone storefront has made way for more sandwiches — there are a baker’s dozen on the menu — and a 30-seat dining room. Order the Italian beef, marinated top round that’s sliced thin, tucked into a sandwich roll, then dunked in meat juices before serving.

A Chicago-style hot dog with a side of tater tots is served in a red basket with parchment paper.
A Chicago dog with celery salt tots.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Gus's Chop House

Gus’s straddles the line between cool neighborhood hangout and family-friendly restaurant: There’s a full-length bathroom mirror for documenting your youth, but also a changing table for mourning it; a $30 steak for the masses, and a bo-bo chicken served with its head and feet still on for those with taste. This chophouse contains multitudes, and quality cuts of meat are the glue that holds it all together. Get there early and ask for the off-menu burger — a thick patty made from a blend of pork and beef that the restaurant makes a handful of each night.

A burger with onions and melty cheese sits on a plate at Gus’s Chop House.
The off-menu burger at Gus’s.
Gus’s Chop House/Teddy Wolff

Pecking House

Pecking House, a fried chicken pop-up that once had a waitlist of almost 10,000 people, found a permanent home in Prospect Heights last year. The greatest hits from the restaurant’s two years on the road — chile fried chicken sandwiches, mapo tofu sloppy joes — are served here, along with new items like chicken salt french fries, canned beer, and cocktails. Don’t be deterred by the small crowds that amass here on weekends; things move quick at this fine-tuned, fast-casual spot.

A pair of tongs dips a piece of fried chicken into a vat of red sauce.
This chicken once had a 10,000-person waitlist.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Masalawala & Sons

The team behind New York’s only Michelin-starred Indian restaurant is out with another hit, this time in Park Slope. Masalawala & Sons is the second coming for a restaurant the team used to run on the Lower East Side under a similar name, but the menu’s been revamped and now looks to bridge the gap between what’s eaten in Indian homes and what’s served in the city’s Indian restaurants. Keep an eye out for macher dim (a sac of fish roe that’s poached in curry) and daab chingri (tiger prawns served in a young coconut shell).

A close-up shot of red and orange sauce and food in a red clay bowl, garnished with shredded green herbs.
Macher dim, a sac of fish roe that’s poached in curry.
Adam Friedlander/Masalawala

SYKO

Find Syrian and Korean food, but not Syrian Korean fusion, at this charming Windsor Terrace takeout counter with exactly one table parked out front. The prices and portions of dishes like the bulgogi “fat boy” — a barbecue beef burrito wrapped up in a greasy pancake — seem to defy inflation. Larger plates like chicken shawarma and bibimbap come with the choice of mezze (or banchan) and make for good sharing.

A person wearing a red sweater clutches a burrito overflowing with bulgogi.
The bulgogi “fat boy.”
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Kingfisher

The sommelier André Hueston Mack has opened a small empire of restaurants in Prospect Lefferts Gardens in recent years. There’s the ham bar & Sons; a walk-up window dispensing breakfast tacos; and a bakery called Chickadee Bread. Kingfisher, a restaurant with an eye for seafood that opened last fall, is his sixth. Plates priced around $20 to $35 each include oysters, monkfish with crushed kettle chips, and a noteworthy shrimp cocktail.

Two razor clams sit atop a bowl.
Razor clams at Kingfisher.
Liz Clayman/Kingfisher

Fatta Mano

Abdul Elenani, the owner of acclaimed Palestinian restaurants Ayat and Al Badawi, opened Fatto Mano last fall — one of few places in the city to serve Italian cuisine that’s also halal. The Bay Ridge restaurant is churning out mostly hits, Eater critic Robert Sietsema said in an early review: The chicken Milanese was as “massive” as he hoped, while the fettuccine Bolognese “tasted as if the noodles had been rolled and cut minutes before.” BYOB.

A blue bowl of wide noodles with an orange colored meat sauce.
The Bolognese at Fatta Mano.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

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