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A trio of marinated cauliflower tacos rest on blue tortillas on a white plate, surrounded by cocktails and a few Mexican appetizers.
Cocktails and cauliflower tacos at Sobre Masa Tortilleria.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

The 15 Hottest New Restaurants in Brooklyn, November 2021

An heirloom corn tortilleria and a source for Chicago hot dogs in Windsor Terrace join the list this month

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Cocktails and cauliflower tacos at Sobre Masa Tortilleria.
| Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Eater editors get asked one question more than any other: Where should I eat right now? While many people still consider Manhattan the locus of New York’s dining scene, some neighborhoods in Brooklyn have become dining destinations in their own right. Here, see a map of the latest Brooklyn debuts drawing NYC’s dining obsessives.

New to the list in November: Dog Day Afternoon (a home for Windy City hot dogs in Windsor Terrace); Runner Up (a wine bar from the Winner team located next door); and Sobre Masa Tortilleria (the city’s first taqueria powered entirely by heirloom corn).

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; the latest data about the delta variant indicates that it may pose a low-to-moderate risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

For more New York dining recommendations, check out the new hotspots in Manhattan, Queens, and the Hamptons.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Taqueria Ramirez

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94 Franklin St
Brooklyn, NY 11222

In a city that seems to have one ear perpetually upturned for Mexican food trends, it’s no surprise that Taqueria Ramirez has been turning heads. This Greenpoint storefront from first-time restaurateurs Giovanni Cervantes and Tania Apolinar serves a game-changing array of Mexican meats prepared in a bubbling choricera. Best of all is the restaurant’s tripa, beef intestine that’s stewed for four hours before being finished off with a blowtorch.

A gloved hands hold a sieve of crumbly red meat over a vat of orange fat and oil, also filled with other meats
The meat-filled choricera at Taqueria Ramirez.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

2. Bar Blondeau

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80 Wythe Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11249

There’s no shortage of French wine bars in New York City, but Bar Blondeau asserts there’s room for at least one more. This sixth-floor restaurant and bar from the owners of Le Crocodile and Chez Ma Tante is focused on natural wine, classic cocktails, and a menu that leans on vegetables and seafood. The dining room’s velvet banquettes and floor-to-ceiling windows might call to mind Midtown Manhattan, but partners Aidan O’Neal and Jake Leiber are going for a vibe that’s more casual than a night out in the city.

An overhead photograph of several dishes including oysters, flatbread, and clams in tomato sauce.
Bar Blondeau’s menu consists mostly of seafood and vegetable dishes.
Liz Clayman/Bar Blondeau

3. Aldama

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91 S 6th St
Brooklyn, NY 11249
(929) 298-0233
Visit Website

Fueled by mezcal and house-made tortillas, Aldama might be the closest thing Brooklyn has to the hip, late-night bars of Mexico City. The newly opened restaurant comes from Christopher Reyes, a former bartender at Cosme and the Nomad, and chef Gerardo Alcaraz. The duo is keeping the party going with regional Mexican dishes — carne cecina, pulpo zarandeado, and al pastor — served until 10 p.m. and a weekly lineup of live DJs.

Three dishes, including a daikon tostada, a ceviche with octopus, and tacos, are arranged on a wooden table
The daikon tostada, campechana, and tacos dorados at Aldama.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

4. Tong

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321 Starr St
Brooklyn, NY 11237
(718) 366-0586
Visit Website

The Thai drinking snacks known as kub klaem are having a moment in Brooklyn, and one of the best places to order them right now is Tong. The Bushwick restaurant specializes in well-seasoned, shareable plates — spicy beef tartare and dressed-up oysters — meant to be eaten alongside a cocktail, a Chang beer, or one of each. Sunisa Nitmai and Chetkangwan Thipruetree are the chefs, a duo whose regional Thai cooking critic Robert Sietsema called “enthralling fun.”

A metal vessel with three kinds of meat next to fried eggs, with toast on the side.
Kai kra ta, a brunch platter made from fried eggs, Chinese sausage, ground pork, and cha lua.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

5. Falansai

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112 Harrison Pl
Brooklyn, NY 11237
(718) 381-0980
Visit Website

Chef Eric Tran is attempting to do the name Falansai justice at this revamped version of the popular Bushwick hangout, where the restaurant’s name has stayed the same but not much else. Having just come off of a stint at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Tran is serving seasonal dishes — pea shoots in duck broth, mussels in red curry — along with a “brilliant” six-course tasting menu priced at $83 per person.

An overhead photograph of a plate of scallions, egg, fried rice, and hotdog-style slices of sausage.
Dad’s Fried Rice, made with Vietnamese-style mortadella.
Erick Kantar/Falansai

6. Sobre Masa Tortilleria

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52 Harrison Pl
Brooklyn, NY 11237

This Bushwick newcomer has pulled off a rare hat trick by operating a cafe, a taqueria, and a “micro tortilleria” all under one roof. (The high ceilings certainly help.) Its tortillas, made solely from imported heirloom grains, can be purchased at a small retail area at the front of the shop ($8 for a dozen), or ordered in taco form from a restaurant and bar in the back, where chef Zack Wangeman is slinging al pastor costras and griddled gringas.

Alambre tacos, a cousin of the fajita made with bell pepper and onion, rest on a plate coated in Oaxaca cheese.
Tacos de alambre at Sobre Masa Tortilleria.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

7. Cherry on Top

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379 Suydam St #3B
Brooklyn, NY 11237

Even as New York’s outdoor dining season starts to cool down, there’s lots of reasons to visit this mostly handmade rooftop bar in Bushwick. Nodding to the all-day wine bars of Paris, France, most of the natural wines here are priced $15 a glass, and a small ramekin of olives comes free to every table. For something more substantial, there’s a short menu of seasonal plates — beetroot pickled egg, head-on smoked trout — created by the team behind Middle Eastern star Sami and Susu.

A plate of burrata, pesto, and vegetables sits in the middle of a red table with a glass of wine and a side dish filled with olives.
An order of pesto, burrata, and tomatoes.
Jeffrey Schroeder/Cherry On Top

8. Sofreh Cafe

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252 Varet St
Brooklyn, NY 11206

From the team behind pioneering Persian restaurant Sofreh comes this follow-up Bushwick cafe, where Yazidi cupcakes and ka’ak bread are served among a half-dozen other Iranian baked goods. One would be wise to order the pirashki, says Eater critic Ryan Sutton, “baseball-sized rounds of soft, doughy bread” that come filled with either mushroom or cumin-packed brisket. Pair one with a cup of cinnamon and rose black tea for a comforting snack rarely seen in Brooklyn.

An imprinted pattern decorates a rust-colored container of squash halva, shot from overhead
Squash halva at Sofreh Cafe.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

9. Gage and Tollner

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372 Fulton St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(347) 689-3677
Visit Website

A revival close to three years in the making, the historic Gage and Tollner returned to Downtown Brooklyn in February. The restaurant received encouraging reviews from just about everyone shortly after opening, and close to a year later, weekend tables are still booking weeks out. Don’t skip the baked Alaska, a heap of chocolate, cherry, and mint ice creams that’s torched in the kitchen, rather than tableside.

A basket with four pieces of fried chicken, round fritters, and very dark green slaw.
Fried chicken and hush puppies at Gage and Tollner.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

10. As You Are

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252 Schermerhorn St
Brooklyn, NY 11217

Former Breslin chef Ryan Jordan and Eater Young Gun Danny Alvarez have teamed up at this Ace Hotel restaurant that bills itself as “a celebration of Brooklyn culture and cuisine.” It’s a tall order in a borough ripe with neighborhood businesses and longstanding classics, but the duo is going for it with an all-encompassing menu of pastel de nata (Portuguese egg tarts), black and white doughnuts, and “BEC” (bean, egg, and chorizo) sandwiches.

Atop a wooden table, a spread of five plates, including doughnuts, egg tarts, toast, and brown rice porridge.
Doughnuts, egg tarts, and other dishes at As You Are.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

11. KIT

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657 Washington Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11238

The closure of MeMe’s Diner in Prospect Heights hit hard for the restaurant’s most avid fans, but this neighborhood cafe from a member of the same team has since opened in its place. KIT — part cafe, part “pop-up incubator” — serves wine, sandwiches, jello cakes, and other items from up-and-coming businesses that operate out of the space on temporary contracts. The business is backed by former MeMe’s Diner co-owner Libby Willis, who also sells pastries from the shop.

One person in a red shirt and straw hat leans on a wooden bar while another person behind the counter makes coffee.
KIT serves jello, wine, pastries, and more.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

12. Runner Up

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367 7th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11215

With the opening of Winner bakery last year, chef Daniel Eddy turned Park Slope’s stroller-packed Fifth Avenue into a dining destination in its own right. Now he’s going for it again with this outdoor seating-only restaurant and wine bar next door, where the rye crumbs for the salt cod croquettes and loaves of monkey bread come from his hit bakery. Dishes range from $5 to $22, while a list of wines that leans French has bottles in both the $30 and triple-digit price ranges.

An overhead photograph of two plates, one with three fish filets and another with a baguette and smear of butter
The baguette at Runner Up comes from Winner bakery next door.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

13. Mockingbird Taco

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469 Rogers Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11225
(347) 789-8207
Visit Website

Not to be outdone by Manhattan, Brooklyn is now home to a growing number of restaurants serving breakfast tacos and burritos made with flour tortillas. One of our favorite arrived earlier this year in the form of Mockingbird Taco, a walk-up window from sommelier André Mack and partner Nico Bouter. The duo is serving five breakfast tacos to start, made with potato, egg, refried beans, cheese, and other fillings ($6 and $9 each).

A white flour tortilla filled with cubes of potato, scrambled egg, and green cilantro laid on a foil wrapper.
A potato and egg breakfast taco with chimichurri.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

14. Dog Day Afternoon

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266 Prospect Park West
Brooklyn, NY 11215

The topping-laden, notoriously elusive Chicago dog has found a home at this Windsor Terrace takeout counter just walking distance from Prospect Park. The regional franks — made by stuffing a Vienna beef hot dog into a poppy seed bun, then dressing it with mustard, neon relish, raw onions, tomato wedges, a dill pickle, sport peppers, and celery salt — are served for about $6 each, and are “as authentic as any in the Windy City,” writes Eater critic Robert Sietsema.

A charred thick sausage sticking out of the end of the bun.
The Polish sausage with sport peppers and sauteed onions.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

15. Ayat

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8504 3rd Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 831-2585
Visit Website

Restaurateur Abdul Elenani and chef Ayat Masoud opened Ayat in Bay Ridge last fall, drawing praise for their towers of spinning meat — one chicken, one beef — and flatbreads griddled on a piping hot saj. The restaurant caught the attention of New York Times critic Pete Wells shortly after opening, who found that its best dishes weren’t its shawarma or kebabs, but its Palestinian staples, including “improbably delicate” lamb kefta and squash stuffed with onions and rice.

Meatballs, sliced-thin potatoes, and peppers bathe in an oily yellow broth in a brown bowl.
Beef and lamb kefta in a yogurt gravy.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

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1. Taqueria Ramirez

94 Franklin St, Brooklyn, NY 11222
A gloved hands hold a sieve of crumbly red meat over a vat of orange fat and oil, also filled with other meats
The meat-filled choricera at Taqueria Ramirez.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

In a city that seems to have one ear perpetually upturned for Mexican food trends, it’s no surprise that Taqueria Ramirez has been turning heads. This Greenpoint storefront from first-time restaurateurs Giovanni Cervantes and Tania Apolinar serves a game-changing array of Mexican meats prepared in a bubbling choricera. Best of all is the restaurant’s tripa, beef intestine that’s stewed for four hours before being finished off with a blowtorch.

94 Franklin St
Brooklyn, NY 11222

2. Bar Blondeau

80 Wythe Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11249
An overhead photograph of several dishes including oysters, flatbread, and clams in tomato sauce.
Bar Blondeau’s menu consists mostly of seafood and vegetable dishes.
Liz Clayman/Bar Blondeau

There’s no shortage of French wine bars in New York City, but Bar Blondeau asserts there’s room for at least one more. This sixth-floor restaurant and bar from the owners of Le Crocodile and Chez Ma Tante is focused on natural wine, classic cocktails, and a menu that leans on vegetables and seafood. The dining room’s velvet banquettes and floor-to-ceiling windows might call to mind Midtown Manhattan, but partners Aidan O’Neal and Jake Leiber are going for a vibe that’s more casual than a night out in the city.

80 Wythe Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11249

3. Aldama

91 S 6th St, Brooklyn, NY 11249
Three dishes, including a daikon tostada, a ceviche with octopus, and tacos, are arranged on a wooden table
The daikon tostada, campechana, and tacos dorados at Aldama.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Fueled by mezcal and house-made tortillas, Aldama might be the closest thing Brooklyn has to the hip, late-night bars of Mexico City. The newly opened restaurant comes from Christopher Reyes, a former bartender at Cosme and the Nomad, and chef Gerardo Alcaraz. The duo is keeping the party going with regional Mexican dishes — carne cecina, pulpo zarandeado, and al pastor — served until 10 p.m. and a weekly lineup of live DJs.

91 S 6th St
Brooklyn, NY 11249

4. Tong

321 Starr St, Brooklyn, NY 11237
A metal vessel with three kinds of meat next to fried eggs, with toast on the side.
Kai kra ta, a brunch platter made from fried eggs, Chinese sausage, ground pork, and cha lua.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Thai drinking snacks known as kub klaem are having a moment in Brooklyn, and one of the best places to order them right now is Tong. The Bushwick restaurant specializes in well-seasoned, shareable plates — spicy beef tartare and dressed-up oysters — meant to be eaten alongside a cocktail, a Chang beer, or one of each. Sunisa Nitmai and Chetkangwan Thipruetree are the chefs, a duo whose regional Thai cooking critic Robert Sietsema called “enthralling fun.”

321 Starr St
Brooklyn, NY 11237

5. Falansai

112 Harrison Pl, Brooklyn, NY 11237
An overhead photograph of a plate of scallions, egg, fried rice, and hotdog-style slices of sausage.
Dad’s Fried Rice, made with Vietnamese-style mortadella.
Erick Kantar/Falansai

Chef Eric Tran is attempting to do the name Falansai justice at this revamped version of the popular Bushwick hangout, where the restaurant’s name has stayed the same but not much else. Having just come off of a stint at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Tran is serving seasonal dishes — pea shoots in duck broth, mussels in red curry — along with a “brilliant” six-course tasting menu priced at $83 per person.

112 Harrison Pl
Brooklyn, NY 11237

6. Sobre Masa Tortilleria

52 Harrison Pl, Brooklyn, NY 11237
Alambre tacos, a cousin of the fajita made with bell pepper and onion, rest on a plate coated in Oaxaca cheese.
Tacos de alambre at Sobre Masa Tortilleria.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

This Bushwick newcomer has pulled off a rare hat trick by operating a cafe, a taqueria, and a “micro tortilleria” all under one roof. (The high ceilings certainly help.) Its tortillas, made solely from imported heirloom grains, can be purchased at a small retail area at the front of the shop ($8 for a dozen), or ordered in taco form from a restaurant and bar in the back, where chef Zack Wangeman is slinging al pastor costras and griddled gringas.

52 Harrison Pl
Brooklyn, NY 11237

7. Cherry on Top

379 Suydam St #3B, Brooklyn, NY 11237
A plate of burrata, pesto, and vegetables sits in the middle of a red table with a glass of wine and a side dish filled with olives.
An order of pesto, burrata, and tomatoes.
Jeffrey Schroeder/Cherry On Top

Even as New York’s outdoor dining season starts to cool down, there’s lots of reasons to visit this mostly handmade rooftop bar in Bushwick. Nodding to the all-day wine bars of Paris, France, most of the natural wines here are priced $15 a glass, and a small ramekin of olives comes free to every table. For something more substantial, there’s a short menu of seasonal plates — beetroot pickled egg, head-on smoked trout — created by the team behind Middle Eastern star Sami and Susu.

379 Suydam St #3B
Brooklyn, NY 11237

8. Sofreh Cafe

252 Varet St, Brooklyn, NY 11206
An imprinted pattern decorates a rust-colored container of squash halva, shot from overhead
Squash halva at Sofreh Cafe.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

From the team behind pioneering Persian restaurant Sofreh comes this follow-up Bushwick cafe, where Yazidi cupcakes and ka’ak bread are served among a half-dozen other Iranian baked goods. One would be wise to order the pirashki, says Eater critic Ryan Sutton, “baseball-sized rounds of soft, doughy bread” that come filled with either mushroom or cumin-packed brisket. Pair one with a cup of cinnamon and rose black tea for a comforting snack rarely seen in Brooklyn.

252 Varet St
Brooklyn, NY 11206

9. Gage and Tollner

372 Fulton St, Brooklyn, NY 11201
A basket with four pieces of fried chicken, round fritters, and very dark green slaw.
Fried chicken and hush puppies at Gage and Tollner.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

A revival close to three years in the making, the historic Gage and Tollner returned to Downtown Brooklyn in February. The restaurant received encouraging reviews from just about everyone shortly after opening, and close to a year later, weekend tables are still booking weeks out. Don’t skip the baked Alaska, a heap of chocolate, cherry, and mint ice creams that’s torched in the kitchen, rather than tableside.

372 Fulton St
Brooklyn, NY 11201

10. As You Are

252 Schermerhorn St, Brooklyn, NY 11217
Atop a wooden table, a spread of five plates, including doughnuts, egg tarts, toast, and brown rice porridge.
Doughnuts, egg tarts, and other dishes at As You Are.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Former Breslin chef Ryan Jordan and Eater Young Gun Danny Alvarez have teamed up at this Ace Hotel restaurant that bills itself as “a celebration of Brooklyn culture and cuisine.” It’s a tall order in a borough ripe with neighborhood businesses and longstanding classics, but the duo is going for it with an all-encompassing menu of pastel de nata (Portuguese egg tarts), black and white doughnuts, and “BEC” (bean, egg, and chorizo) sandwiches.

252 Schermerhorn St
Brooklyn, NY 11217

11. KIT

657 Washington Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11238
One person in a red shirt and straw hat leans on a wooden bar while another person behind the counter makes coffee.
KIT serves jello, wine, pastries, and more.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

The closure of MeMe’s Diner in Prospect Heights hit hard for the restaurant’s most avid fans, but this neighborhood cafe from a member of the same team has since opened in its place. KIT — part cafe, part “pop-up incubator” — serves wine, sandwiches, jello cakes, and other items from up-and-coming businesses that operate out of the space on temporary contracts. The business is backed by former MeMe’s Diner co-owner Libby Willis, who also sells pastries from the shop.

657 Washington Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11238

12. Runner Up

367 7th Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11215
An overhead photograph of two plates, one with three fish filets and another with a baguette and smear of butter
The baguette at Runner Up comes from Winner bakery next door.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

With the opening of Winner bakery last year, chef Daniel Eddy turned Park Slope’s stroller-packed Fifth Avenue into a dining destination in its own right. Now he’s going for it again with this outdoor seating-only restaurant and wine bar next door, where the rye crumbs for the salt cod croquettes and loaves of monkey bread come from his hit bakery. Dishes range from $5 to $22, while a list of wines that leans French has bottles in both the $30 and triple-digit price ranges.

367 7th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11215

13. Mockingbird Taco

469 Rogers Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11225
A white flour tortilla filled with cubes of potato, scrambled egg, and green cilantro laid on a foil wrapper.
A potato and egg breakfast taco with chimichurri.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Not to be outdone by Manhattan, Brooklyn is now home to a growing number of restaurants serving breakfast tacos and burritos made with flour tortillas. One of our favorite arrived earlier this year in the form of Mockingbird Taco, a walk-up window from sommelier André Mack and partner Nico Bouter. The duo is serving five breakfast tacos to start, made with potato, egg, refried beans, cheese, and other fillings ($6 and $9 each).

469 Rogers Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11225

14. Dog Day Afternoon

266 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, NY 11215
A charred thick sausage sticking out of the end of the bun.
The Polish sausage with sport peppers and sauteed onions.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The topping-laden, notoriously elusive Chicago dog has found a home at this Windsor Terrace takeout counter just walking distance from Prospect Park. The regional franks — made by stuffing a Vienna beef hot dog into a poppy seed bun, then dressing it with mustard, neon relish, raw onions, tomato wedges, a dill pickle, sport peppers, and celery salt — are served for about $6 each, and are “as authentic as any in the Windy City,” writes Eater critic Robert Sietsema.

266 Prospect Park West
Brooklyn, NY 11215

15. Ayat

8504 3rd Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11209
Meatballs, sliced-thin potatoes, and peppers bathe in an oily yellow broth in a brown bowl.
Beef and lamb kefta in a yogurt gravy.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Restaurateur Abdul Elenani and chef Ayat Masoud opened Ayat in Bay Ridge last fall, drawing praise for their towers of spinning meat — one chicken, one beef — and flatbreads griddled on a piping hot saj. The restaurant caught the attention of New York Times critic Pete Wells shortly after opening, who found that its best dishes weren’t its shawarma or kebabs, but its Palestinian staples, including “improbably delicate” lamb kefta and squash stuffed with onions and rice.

8504 3rd Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11209

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