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A fried chicken sandwich is stacked on parchment paper on a red cafeteria tray.
Pecking House’s fried chicken sandwich.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

The 15 Hottest New Restaurants in Brooklyn, October 2022

A Cobble Hill chophouse and the permanent home of a popular fried chicken pop-up join the list this month

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Pecking House’s fried chicken sandwich.
| Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Eater editors get asked one question more than any other: Where should I eat right now? While many people still consider Manhattan the locus of New York’s dining scene, some neighborhoods in Brooklyn have become dining destinations in their own right. On this map, you’ll find the latest Brooklyn debuts drawing NYC’s dining obsessives.

New to the list in October: Kru, a Thai restaurant from a former Fish Cheeks chef; Gus’s Chop House, a family-friendly restaurant with steaks and more; and Pecking House, a permanent location for the popular fried chicken pop-up.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

For more New York dining recommendations, check out the new hotspots in Manhattan, Queens, and the Hamptons.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

The team behind 886 in the East Village opened this second restaurant earlier this year, a neighborhood hangout that’s billed as “more grown up” — even if it still sells baijiu shots. Eric Sze, a 2021 Eater New Guard, turned to his native Taiwan for this menu of “numbing” celtuce salad, pork belly with cuttlefish, and a limited number of whole fried chicken that can sell out for the night within minutes of opening. The chef has left the drinking challenges of his first restaurant behind, but he’s keeping things light with “shot roulettes” and a Long Island Iced tea for four that comes topped with a flaming piece of youtiao.

A series of dishes are arranged on a table, the middle of which is a deboned fried chicken served with its talons.
You may never taste this chicken.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

KRU Brooklyn

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One of the founders of Fish Cheeks is behind this Williamsburg newcomer, which claims to reinterpret ancient recipes from Thai royals. Small plates range from $15 to $30 each, and wine nerds will find lots to love on the thoughtful drinks list, which also lists beer made with Sichuan peppercorns. Be sure to order at least one of the curries — the stuffed pepper with pork belly is rich and filling, while a brown bowl of beef tongue comes with lots of warnings about spice levels from staff, even if it’s perfectly manageable for those with a tolerance.

A bowl of brown soup bobs with bits of beef tongue at Kru, a new Thai restaurant in Brooklyn.
The beef tongue curry.
Teddy Wolff/Kru

Laser Wolf Brooklyn

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Expect to “sweat and eat meat” at the Brooklyn location of this famed Philadelphia restaurant, says Michael Solomonov, the chef and owner behind Laser Wolf. Solomonov, who used to run a hummus counter out of Chelsea Market that’s since closed, is giving it another go in New York City with this Israeli grill house atop the Hoxton hotel in Williamsburg. Dessert comes with every meal, and the thick-cut french fries shouldn't be missed.

A sliced T-bone steak arranged in a circular metal platter with cups of salatim and dips placed around the platter.
Entrees, which range from $43 to $52 apiece, come with dessert and unlimited sides.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Chino Grande

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If fighting over lobster french fries to the tune of karaoke sounds like a night well spent, Chino Grande might be for you. This Williamsburg restaurant from a co-owner of Win Son bills itself as a “karaoke saloon” — and even though singing is only permitted after 10 p.m. on weekdays, and 11 p.m. on weekends, the bar is buzzing here most hours of the day. Look out for a short menu of finger foods like swordfish skewers, five-spice pork ribs, and an order of $65 french fries topped with a whole lobster.

Hands dive in to pick up fries on a plate with a whole lobster on it.
A heap of french fries with lobster at Chino Grande.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Ensenada

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Mariscos are finally getting their due in New York City, with help from Mexican seafood counter Mariscos El Submarino in Queens. There, generous portions of raw and cooked seafood come served in volcanic stone bowls of lime and Maggi spicy enough to make your face twitch. At Ensenada, those same dishes get the Williamsburg treatment: The prices are higher, the portions are smaller, and the vibes are vibier — this is a restaurant above the Black Flamingo night club, after all — but rest assured, some of the city’s best ceviches and aguachiles await.

Slices of avocado, radish, onion, and fish float in a bowl of brown broth.
The aguachile negro at Ensenada.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Iranian small plates and wood-fired cooking are the focus at this Persian restaurant from Ali Saboor, who previously ran the kitchen at Prospect Heights’s acclaimed Sofreh. Now in Bushwick, the chef is serving barbari bread with borani (a mix of potatoes, saffron yogurt, and pickled red peppers) and an impressive lineup of kebabs — octopus, chicken thigh, trumpet mushroom, and more — that are “delicious in a fussier way,” says Eater critic Ryan Sutton. The lively but casual vibe here also makes Eyval one of the best places for a solo meal.

A white bowl is filled with mushrooms, fava beans, and saffron-tinged rice at the center.
Mushroom and fava beans with saffron rice.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Ostudio

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A rotating cast of guest chefs is the calling card at this wine bar in the northern reaches of Bed-Stuy, where you can usually count on something new. A portion of the menu changes from month to month, as resident chefs and pop-ups takeover Ostudio’s small kitchen in temporary stints: Dinner might consist of sweet corn baked Alaska one week and chicken pho the next. A portion of the menu stays the same, anchored by small plates of produce and seafood. Don’t miss the maitake mushroom with seaweed butter and horseradish.

A green backdrop features a white bowl with a burrata dish with fava beans.
At Ostudio, there’s a daily menu in addition to dishes from guest chefs.
Gentl & Hyers/Ostudio

Dept of Culture

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This restaurant in Bed-Stuy is serving what’s likely the city’s only tasting menu to highlight regional Nigerian cooking, where three courses and a dessert might include dishes like fiery fish pepper soup and suya octopus ($90 per person). Tasting menus often come with rules — dress requirements, white tablecloths — but here dinner is served at a 12-seat communal table, usually with a heavy-handed pour of wine and a story from owner Ayo Balogun.

A person, Ayo Balogun, stands in the dining room of his Bed-Stuy restaurant called Department of Culture.
Owner Ayo Balogun, standing behind Dept of Culture’s communal table.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

Oma Grassa

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It’s not every month that Fort Greene winds up on this map — not for lack of love, just mostly for a lack of new exciting restaurant openings. Oma Grassa brings something genuinely exciting to the neighborhood, serving charred sourdough pies that might remind you of Ops in Bushwick. The eight or so pizzas on the menu rotate out from time to time but count on pies loaded with generous handfuls of pepperoni cups and farmers market vegetables. Walk-in only.

A pepperoni pizza with lots of char along the edges.
A pepperoni pie gleams at Oma Grassa.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Nabila's

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The front counter of this Lebanese restaurant is crowded with baking trays and cast-iron pans of prepared foods, making it feel something like a cross between a Sweetgreen and mom's kitchen. There’s a laminated menu listing the restaurant's pastries, mezze, and larger entrees, but honestly, a meal here is probably better assembled by getting in line and talking with owner Mike Farah about what's available — or about to be. Look out for the garlicky stuffed cabbage and the shish barak, baked beef dumplings served in a yogurt sauce.

Hands wielding a fork and knife dig into the leftovers of a Lebanese feast at Nabila’s, a Carroll Gardens restaurant.
The remains of a Lebanese feast at Nabila’s.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Rodo Foods

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This small restaurant landed in Bed-Stuy in March, boasting a small menu of West African meats and side dishes that can be ordered for takeout or eaten at a handful of seats out front. There are plantains, jollof rice, and grilled salmon that’s unconventionally made with hot honey, but best of all of the beef suya, tender slices of meat rubbed with a mixture of ground peanuts, garlic, ginger, and other spices. Open Friday to Sunday.

An overhead photograph of a takeout container of beef suya, kale salad, and jollof rice.
A takeout container brimming with beef suya and jollof rice.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Gus's Chop House

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Gus’s straddles the line between cool neighborhood hangout and family-friendly restaurant: There’s a full-length bathroom mirror for documenting your youth, but also a changing table for mourning it; a $28 Flatiron steak for the masses, and a chicken served with its head and feet still on for those with taste. This chophouse contains multitudes, and quality cuts of meat are the glue that holds it all together. Get there early and ask for the off-menu burger — a thick patty made from a blend of pork and beef that the restaurant only makes a limited number of each night.

A hand holds a thick burger overflowing with raw and cooked onions.
The off-menu burger at Gus’s.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Pecking House

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Pecking House, a fried chicken pop-up that once had a waitlist just shy of 10,000 people, found a permanent home in Prospect Heights this summer. The greatest hits from the pop-up’s two years on the road — chile fried chicken sandwiches, mapo tofu sloppy joes — are all represented here, plus some new additions like chicken salt french fries, canned beer, and cocktails. Don’t be deterred by the small crowd of customers you’ll probably find out front on weekends; the line moves quick at this fine-tuned, fast-casual operation.

A pair of tongs dips a piece of fried chicken into a vat of red sauce.
This chicken once had a 10,000-person waitlist.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

The Good Fork Pub

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The Good Fork Pub, while technically a bar, more than holds its own on this list of new restaurants. This revamped Red Hook hangout comes from a team that knows food, for one — its owners are also behind Insa, a Korean restaurant in Gowanus, and the revamped Gage & Tollner in Downtown Brooklyn — but this bar also wins points for its creative menu of bar snacks, with enough bigger options to have a full meal. Look out for the “Korean, by way of Philly” cheesesteak — gochujang short rib, American cheese, and kimchi mayo on a hero — and the veggie smash burger, whose patties are made in-house.

A bowl of fried wontons with kimchi beer cheese basks in the natural light of a nearby window.
Wontons with kimchi beer cheese.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Lucia Pizza Of Avenue X

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Salvatore Carlino was raised on pizza, so it’s no surprise there’s been buzz around the chef’s first restaurant. His family operated Manhattan Beach’s Papa Leone’s, which closed in 2017, and founded corner slice shop Smiling Pizza in Park Slope. Carlino opened the doors on his own pizza parlor in Sheepshead Bay earlier this year with margherita, white, and plain pies. Be sure to try the vodka pizza, which uses the same recipe from Papa Leone’s, dating back to 1974.

An overhead photograph of a quarter of a pizza, topped with cheeses and crumbled meats.
Behold, the pies of Lucia Pizza of Avenue X.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Wenwen

A series of dishes are arranged on a table, the middle of which is a deboned fried chicken served with its talons.
You may never taste this chicken.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

The team behind 886 in the East Village opened this second restaurant earlier this year, a neighborhood hangout that’s billed as “more grown up” — even if it still sells baijiu shots. Eric Sze, a 2021 Eater New Guard, turned to his native Taiwan for this menu of “numbing” celtuce salad, pork belly with cuttlefish, and a limited number of whole fried chicken that can sell out for the night within minutes of opening. The chef has left the drinking challenges of his first restaurant behind, but he’s keeping things light with “shot roulettes” and a Long Island Iced tea for four that comes topped with a flaming piece of youtiao.

A series of dishes are arranged on a table, the middle of which is a deboned fried chicken served with its talons.
You may never taste this chicken.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

KRU Brooklyn

A bowl of brown soup bobs with bits of beef tongue at Kru, a new Thai restaurant in Brooklyn.
The beef tongue curry.
Teddy Wolff/Kru

One of the founders of Fish Cheeks is behind this Williamsburg newcomer, which claims to reinterpret ancient recipes from Thai royals. Small plates range from $15 to $30 each, and wine nerds will find lots to love on the thoughtful drinks list, which also lists beer made with Sichuan peppercorns. Be sure to order at least one of the curries — the stuffed pepper with pork belly is rich and filling, while a brown bowl of beef tongue comes with lots of warnings about spice levels from staff, even if it’s perfectly manageable for those with a tolerance.

A bowl of brown soup bobs with bits of beef tongue at Kru, a new Thai restaurant in Brooklyn.
The beef tongue curry.
Teddy Wolff/Kru

Laser Wolf Brooklyn

A sliced T-bone steak arranged in a circular metal platter with cups of salatim and dips placed around the platter.
Entrees, which range from $43 to $52 apiece, come with dessert and unlimited sides.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Expect to “sweat and eat meat” at the Brooklyn location of this famed Philadelphia restaurant, says Michael Solomonov, the chef and owner behind Laser Wolf. Solomonov, who used to run a hummus counter out of Chelsea Market that’s since closed, is giving it another go in New York City with this Israeli grill house atop the Hoxton hotel in Williamsburg. Dessert comes with every meal, and the thick-cut french fries shouldn't be missed.

A sliced T-bone steak arranged in a circular metal platter with cups of salatim and dips placed around the platter.
Entrees, which range from $43 to $52 apiece, come with dessert and unlimited sides.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Chino Grande

Hands dive in to pick up fries on a plate with a whole lobster on it.
A heap of french fries with lobster at Chino Grande.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

If fighting over lobster french fries to the tune of karaoke sounds like a night well spent, Chino Grande might be for you. This Williamsburg restaurant from a co-owner of Win Son bills itself as a “karaoke saloon” — and even though singing is only permitted after 10 p.m. on weekdays, and 11 p.m. on weekends, the bar is buzzing here most hours of the day. Look out for a short menu of finger foods like swordfish skewers, five-spice pork ribs, and an order of $65 french fries topped with a whole lobster.

Hands dive in to pick up fries on a plate with a whole lobster on it.
A heap of french fries with lobster at Chino Grande.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Ensenada

Slices of avocado, radish, onion, and fish float in a bowl of brown broth.
The aguachile negro at Ensenada.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Mariscos are finally getting their due in New York City, with help from Mexican seafood counter Mariscos El Submarino in Queens. There, generous portions of raw and cooked seafood come served in volcanic stone bowls of lime and Maggi spicy enough to make your face twitch. At Ensenada, those same dishes get the Williamsburg treatment: The prices are higher, the portions are smaller, and the vibes are vibier — this is a restaurant above the Black Flamingo night club, after all — but rest assured, some of the city’s best ceviches and aguachiles await.

Slices of avocado, radish, onion, and fish float in a bowl of brown broth.
The aguachile negro at Ensenada.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Eyval

A white bowl is filled with mushrooms, fava beans, and saffron-tinged rice at the center.
Mushroom and fava beans with saffron rice.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Iranian small plates and wood-fired cooking are the focus at this Persian restaurant from Ali Saboor, who previously ran the kitchen at Prospect Heights’s acclaimed Sofreh. Now in Bushwick, the chef is serving barbari bread with borani (a mix of potatoes, saffron yogurt, and pickled red peppers) and an impressive lineup of kebabs — octopus, chicken thigh, trumpet mushroom, and more — that are “delicious in a fussier way,” says Eater critic Ryan Sutton. The lively but casual vibe here also makes Eyval one of the best places for a solo meal.

A white bowl is filled with mushrooms, fava beans, and saffron-tinged rice at the center.
Mushroom and fava beans with saffron rice.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Ostudio

A green backdrop features a white bowl with a burrata dish with fava beans.
At Ostudio, there’s a daily menu in addition to dishes from guest chefs.
Gentl & Hyers/Ostudio

A rotating cast of guest chefs is the calling card at this wine bar in the northern reaches of Bed-Stuy, where you can usually count on something new. A portion of the menu changes from month to month, as resident chefs and pop-ups takeover Ostudio’s small kitchen in temporary stints: Dinner might consist of sweet corn baked Alaska one week and chicken pho the next. A portion of the menu stays the same, anchored by small plates of produce and seafood. Don’t miss the maitake mushroom with seaweed butter and horseradish.

A green backdrop features a white bowl with a burrata dish with fava beans.
At Ostudio, there’s a daily menu in addition to dishes from guest chefs.
Gentl & Hyers/Ostudio

Dept of Culture

A person, Ayo Balogun, stands in the dining room of his Bed-Stuy restaurant called Department of Culture.
Owner Ayo Balogun, standing behind Dept of Culture’s communal table.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

This restaurant in Bed-Stuy is serving what’s likely the city’s only tasting menu to highlight regional Nigerian cooking, where three courses and a dessert might include dishes like fiery fish pepper soup and suya octopus ($90 per person). Tasting menus often come with rules — dress requirements, white tablecloths — but here dinner is served at a 12-seat communal table, usually with a heavy-handed pour of wine and a story from owner Ayo Balogun.

A person, Ayo Balogun, stands in the dining room of his Bed-Stuy restaurant called Department of Culture.
Owner Ayo Balogun, standing behind Dept of Culture’s communal table.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

Oma Grassa

A pepperoni pizza with lots of char along the edges.
A pepperoni pie gleams at Oma Grassa.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

It’s not every month that Fort Greene winds up on this map — not for lack of love, just mostly for a lack of new exciting restaurant openings. Oma Grassa brings something genuinely exciting to the neighborhood, serving charred sourdough pies that might remind you of Ops in Bushwick. The eight or so pizzas on the menu rotate out from time to time but count on pies loaded with generous handfuls of pepperoni cups and farmers market vegetables. Walk-in only.

A pepperoni pizza with lots of char along the edges.
A pepperoni pie gleams at Oma Grassa.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Nabila's

Hands wielding a fork and knife dig into the leftovers of a Lebanese feast at Nabila’s, a Carroll Gardens restaurant.
The remains of a Lebanese feast at Nabila’s.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

The front counter of this Lebanese restaurant is crowded with baking trays and cast-iron pans of prepared foods, making it feel something like a cross between a Sweetgreen and mom's kitchen. There’s a laminated menu listing the restaurant's pastries, mezze, and larger entrees, but honestly, a meal here is probably better assembled by getting in line and talking with owner Mike Farah about what's available — or about to be. Look out for the garlicky stuffed cabbage and the shish barak, baked beef dumplings served in a yogurt sauce.

Hands wielding a fork and knife dig into the leftovers of a Lebanese feast at Nabila’s, a Carroll Gardens restaurant.
The remains of a Lebanese feast at Nabila’s.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Rodo Foods

An overhead photograph of a takeout container of beef suya, kale salad, and jollof rice.
A takeout container brimming with beef suya and jollof rice.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

This small restaurant landed in Bed-Stuy in March, boasting a small menu of West African meats and side dishes that can be ordered for takeout or eaten at a handful of seats out front. There are plantains, jollof rice, and grilled salmon that’s unconventionally made with hot honey, but best of all of the beef suya, tender slices of meat rubbed with a mixture of ground peanuts, garlic, ginger, and other spices. Open Friday to Sunday.

An overhead photograph of a takeout container of beef suya, kale salad, and jollof rice.
A takeout container brimming with beef suya and jollof rice.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Gus's Chop House

A hand holds a thick burger overflowing with raw and cooked onions.
The off-menu burger at Gus’s.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Gus’s straddles the line between cool neighborhood hangout and family-friendly restaurant: There’s a full-length bathroom mirror for documenting your youth, but also a changing table for mourning it; a $28 Flatiron steak for the masses, and a chicken served with its head and feet still on for those with taste. This chophouse contains multitudes, and quality cuts of meat are the glue that holds it all together. Get there early and ask for the off-menu burger — a thick patty made from a blend of pork and beef that the restaurant only makes a limited number of each night.

A hand holds a thick burger overflowing with raw and cooked onions.
The off-menu burger at Gus’s.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Pecking House

A pair of tongs dips a piece of fried chicken into a vat of red sauce.
This chicken once had a 10,000-person waitlist.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Pecking House, a fried chicken pop-up that once had a waitlist just shy of 10,000 people, found a permanent home in Prospect Heights this summer. The greatest hits from the pop-up’s two years on the road — chile fried chicken sandwiches, mapo tofu sloppy joes — are all represented here, plus some new additions like chicken salt french fries, canned beer, and cocktails. Don’t be deterred by the small crowd of customers you’ll probably find out front on weekends; the line moves quick at this fine-tuned, fast-casual operation.

A pair of tongs dips a piece of fried chicken into a vat of red sauce.
This chicken once had a 10,000-person waitlist.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

The Good Fork Pub

A bowl of fried wontons with kimchi beer cheese basks in the natural light of a nearby window.
Wontons with kimchi beer cheese.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

The Good Fork Pub, while technically a bar, more than holds its own on this list of new restaurants. This revamped Red Hook hangout comes from a team that knows food, for one — its owners are also behind Insa, a Korean restaurant in Gowanus, and the revamped Gage & Tollner in Downtown Brooklyn — but this bar also wins points for its creative menu of bar snacks, with enough bigger options to have a full meal. Look out for the “Korean, by way of Philly” cheesesteak — gochujang short rib, American cheese, and kimchi mayo on a hero — and the veggie smash burger, whose patties are made in-house.

A bowl of fried wontons with kimchi beer cheese basks in the natural light of a nearby window.
Wontons with kimchi beer cheese.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Lucia Pizza Of Avenue X

An overhead photograph of a quarter of a pizza, topped with cheeses and crumbled meats.
Behold, the pies of Lucia Pizza of Avenue X.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Salvatore Carlino was raised on pizza, so it’s no surprise there’s been buzz around the chef’s first restaurant. His family operated Manhattan Beach’s Papa Leone’s, which closed in 2017, and founded corner slice shop Smiling Pizza in Park Slope. Carlino opened the doors on