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A bowl of noodles and seafood with a lime wedge on the side.
Guay tiew tom yum from Wan Wan.
Andrew Bui/Wan Wan

The 15 Hottest New Restaurants in Manhattan, June 2022

A stylish Thai spot from the team behind Kimika and Wayla and a second act from modern Korean spot Oiji joins the list this month

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Guay tiew tom yum from Wan Wan.
| Andrew Bui/Wan Wan

Eater editors get asked one question more than any other: Where should I eat right now? Here, we’ve put together a map of the latest Manhattan debuts drawing NYC’s dining obsessives.

New to the list in June: Oiji Mi (the second act from the restaurateurs behind acclaimed modern Korean spot Oiji), Librae Bakery (a cozy, Middle Eastern-rooted bakery and coffee shop), and Wan Wan (a Thai restaurant from the team behind downtown Manhattan hot spots Kimika and Wayla).

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

For more New York dining recommendations, check out the new hotspots in Brooklyn and Queens.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Charles Pan-Fried Chicken

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In one of the most highly anticipated early debuts of the year, Charles Gabriel’s legendary fried chicken is back. The decades-old Harlem icon — which also opened a location on the Upper West Side in February — is known for its lesser-seen approach to frying chicken, crisping the bird in a giant skillet instead of vats of bubbling oil. The impressive, flavorful result has gained the restaurant legions of followers. Customers line up for Charles’ crunchy chicken, creamy mac and cheese, and lima beans that Eater critic Robert Sietsema says will convert even the staunchest lima bean doubter. Barbecued ribs, pulled pork, and smothered chicken are also on the menu.

A line stretches around the block at Charles Pan-Fried Chicken, the Harlem location of a budding restaurant chain.
Customers gather outside Charles Pan-Fried Chicken in Harlem on its opening weekend.
Melanie Landsman/Eater NY

All'antico Vinaio

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Crowds of customers swarmed Italian import All’antico Vinaio from the minute it opened its doors near Times Square, and for good reason: The famed Florentine shop’s square, stuffed sandwiches are creamy, cheesy, meaty delights. Follow Eater critic Robert Sietsema’s recommendation and order the messy triumph known as la favolosa, featuring pungent Tuscan salami, spicy eggplant, and both pecorino and artichoke creams.

Three figures on the sidewalk dressed in autumn clothes eat sandwiches.
Customers digging into their sandwiches outside of All’antico Vinaio.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ci Siamo

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Chef Hillary Sterling is playing with fire at Ci Siamo, the latest debut from Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group. Sterling launched the Italian restaurant, located inside Hudson Yards-adjacent development Manhattan West with pastas, wood-fired trout, and a blistered, caramelized onion torta that’s been turning heads. The dessert program, featuring gelati, sorbetti, and a chocolate amaro-filled bomboloni is overseen by lauded pastry chef Claudia Fleming.

A lineup of three gelatos scooped into stemmed glassware and resting on white saucers.
Ci Siamo’s gelati.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Café China

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Cafe China — an acclaimed Sichuan restaurant that held a Michelin star for seven years — temporarily shuttered for five months in 2021, and now has been reborn in a three-story brick building in Midtown. The chic restaurant, run by Xian Zhang and Yiming Wang, marries old menu favorites like cumin lamb and tea-smoked duck with new-guard entries like a whole steamed fish with cayenne and tabasco peppers, plus dim sum and other regional Chinese dishes.

An assortment of dishes are strewn out on a table at Cafe China.
Cafe China is serving Sichuan classics alongside Cantonese dim sum.
Cafe China

El Quijote

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El Quijote’s return has been four years in the making, ever since the Hotel Chelsea shut down the storied spot for renovations in 2018. The Spanish restaurant has now been polished and revamped by the hip team behind Sunday in Brooklyn and partner Charles Seich. Seafood is the highlight here, from lobster grilled on a plancha and slicked in butter and sherry, to the restaurant’s impressive paella, now studded with squid, cockles, mussels, blue prawns, and rabbit.

An overhead shot of a round dish of paella filled with rice and seafood.
Paella from El Quijote.
Eric Medsker/El Quijote

The first step in the next chapter at 85 10th Avenue — the former home of lauded-yet-troubled Italian destination Del Posto — has arrived. Executive chef Melissa Rodriguez is running the show at Mel’s, a weeknight hangout with wood-fired pizza, grilled steaks, and overflowing sundae cups. It’s the more casual counterpart to Rodriguez’s forthcoming fine dining restaurant Al Coro and cocktail bar Discolo, also in the same space.

The empty interior of a new restaurant with a tiled front walkway and bar to the left.
The dining room at Mel’s.
Adrian Gaut/Mel’s

Oiji Mi

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Add Oiji Mi to the running list of restaurants offering tasting menus for around $100. The one served here — priced at $125 for five courses — highlights modern Korean inventions like foie gras with bokbunja (a Korean fruit wine) and deconstructed bo ssam with oysters and pork belly. Despite the early buzz, there’s plenty of reservations at this 80-seat Flatiron restaurant, which comes from the team behind acclaimed modern Korean restaurant Oiji, in the East Village.

Two pieces of foie gras, blanketed in a brown sauce and adorned with flowers.
Oiji Mi’s foie gras.
Christian Harder/Oiji Mi

Rowdy Rooster

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The hotshots behind one of America’s best new restaurants of 2021 are not slowing down. In their latest debut, restaurateur Roni Mazumdar and chef Chintan Pandya are frying up crunchy, spicy fried chicken familiar in India and transplanting it to the East Village. The tiny shop is churning out fried chicken at three different spice levels, plus chicken sandwiches with scallion yogurt and mint chutney, and sides including crispy eggplant or potato pakoras, masala corn, and tomato rice. For vegetarians, the snack-sized vado pao — a spiced potato patty with mint and tamarind chutney on a buttered pao roll — is an equally spicy hit.

A takeout container filled with pieces of fried chicken against a black background.
Fried chicken from Rowdy Rooster.
Paul McDonough/Rowdy Rooster

Librae Bakery

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Middle Eastern, Danish, and New York influences have converged at Librae, a bakery and coffee shop that opened in May with espresso-glazed croissants and sourdough breads made with fermented Bahrani dates. Owner Dona Murad runs the shop with her husband Andre Gerschel, and her mother helps out with some of the baking, she says. Murad also runs a bakery and coffee roastery in Bahrain, and Gerschel has opened restaurants around the Middle East and U.K. “We’ve lived around the world and we wanted to bring that energy to this space,” Murad says.

A croissant decorated with rose and pistachio crumbles sits on a stylish plate on a marble counter.
A pistachio rose croissant from Librae Bakery.
Librae Bakery

Nudibranch

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A trio of Momofuku alums — Jeff Kim, Matthew Lee, and Victor Xia — started Nudibranch as a pop-up, a place where they could cook dishes that drew upon their collective experiences working at the David Chang restaurant group and other restaurants across town. Last month, they found a permanent home for their cooking in the East Village, where the $75 prix fixe menu leans heavily on traditional Asian ingredients in dishes like soba showered with shavings of bottarga; cauliflower paired with a Vietnamese dipping sauce and Chinese sausage; and fried frog legs topped with a medley of herbs like lemongrass and galangal.

A white bowl with a mushroom dish in it with an egg yolk
Shaoxing mushrooms at Nudibranch.
Nudibranch

Bar Tulix

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Justin Bazdarich, the chef and owner behind Oxomoco, trendy pizza spot Speedy Romeo, and the short-lived vegan Mexican spot Xilonen, has partnered with veteran restaurateur John McDonald to open Bar Tulix, a Mexican-leaning seafood restaurant in Soho. The bar program nods heavily to tequila and mezcal, while the upscale menu ranges from shrimp cocktail tostadas to patatas bravas with pickled chiles and black sea bass crusted in masa.

Seafood and vegetables are laid out on white plates, showcasing the menu offerings at Bar Tulix.
A spread of dishes at Bar Tulix.
Alexander Stein/Bar Tulix

L’Abeille

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Chef Mitsunobu Nagae, a Joël Robuchon veteran, has stepped out on his own at L’Abeille, a French fine dining spot that Nagae threads together with a few Japanese touches. The seasonal $185 tasting menu has included red miso-glazed squab and a pan-fried tile fish with fennel puree. (An a la carte menu is available at the bar and main dining room.) The refined, jewel-toned Tribeca space was built around the concept of “bistronomy,” where fine dining and bistro sensibilities meet.

A restaurant dining room with velvet green banquettes and tables flanked by blue velvet seats.
L’Abeille’s dining room.
Nicole Franzen/L’Abeille

Wan Wan

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The reliable team behind stylish downtown hits including Kimika and Wayla have added another restaurant to the fold: Wan Wan, a regional Thai restaurant that hones in on the food of the country’s famed island destination Phuket. Chef Tom Naumsuwan — who is also the executive chef at Wayla — oversees the menu at Wan Wan, which includes appetizers like nung gai tod, a tangle of crispy chicken skin tossed in garlic and sea salt, and hearty main dishes including sen pla, a bowl of fish noodles served with seared branzino.

An overhead shot of a pile of crispy chicken skin strips set on a white plate with a green banana leaf laid down the middle. A lime wedge is on the side of the plate.
Wan Wan’s nung gai tod.
Andrew Bui/Wan Wan

Chef Victoria Blamey attracted plenty of headlines during high-profile tenures at storied pub Chumley’s and Manhattan fine dining institution Gotham Bar and Grill. Now, she’s stepping outside of any well-known restaurant’s shadow. Mena, named after Blamey’s great aunt, highlights the chef’s Chilean roots with a seafood and vegetable-heavy menu that’s threaded with hits from Blamey’s recent pop-up residences, including cholgas secas, featuring smoke-dried mussels coated with an onion glaze.

A spread of wine glasses, silverware, and colorful, round dishes plated with food, laid out on a light circular table.
A spread of dishes from Mena.
Daniel Krieger/Mena

Mott Street Eatery

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Manhattan’s Chinatown recently gained an exciting new dining destination in Mott Street Eatery, a bustling 10-stall food court similar to those found in Flushing, Sunset Park, and Elmhurst. During an early visit, Eater critic Robert Sietsema found an impressive array of roasted meats, well-executed hand rolls from a sushi chef known as Jiro, and duck and lobster pizza, among other offerings.

A food court filled with white tables, about half occupied.
Mott Street Eatery’s food court.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Charles Pan-Fried Chicken

A line stretches around the block at Charles Pan-Fried Chicken, the Harlem location of a budding restaurant chain.
Customers gather outside Charles Pan-Fried Chicken in Harlem on its opening weekend.
Melanie Landsman/Eater NY

In one of the most highly anticipated early debuts of the year, Charles Gabriel’s legendary fried chicken is back. The decades-old Harlem icon — which also opened a location on the Upper West Side in February — is known for its lesser-seen approach to frying chicken, crisping the bird in a giant skillet instead of vats of bubbling oil. The impressive, flavorful result has gained the restaurant legions of followers. Customers line up for Charles’ crunchy chicken, creamy mac and cheese, and lima beans that Eater critic Robert Sietsema says will convert even the staunchest lima bean doubter. Barbecued ribs, pulled pork, and smothered chicken are also on the menu.

A line stretches around the block at Charles Pan-Fried Chicken, the Harlem location of a budding restaurant chain.
Customers gather outside Charles Pan-Fried Chicken in Harlem on its opening weekend.
Melanie Landsman/Eater NY

All'antico Vinaio

Three figures on the sidewalk dressed in autumn clothes eat sandwiches.
Customers digging into their sandwiches outside of All’antico Vinaio.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Crowds of customers swarmed Italian import All’antico Vinaio from the minute it opened its doors near Times Square, and for good reason: The famed Florentine shop’s square, stuffed sandwiches are creamy, cheesy, meaty delights. Follow Eater critic Robert Sietsema’s recommendation and order the messy triumph known as la favolosa, featuring pungent Tuscan salami, spicy eggplant, and both pecorino and artichoke creams.

Three figures on the sidewalk dressed in autumn clothes eat sandwiches.
Customers digging into their sandwiches outside of All’antico Vinaio.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ci Siamo

A lineup of three gelatos scooped into stemmed glassware and resting on white saucers.
Ci Siamo’s gelati.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Chef Hillary Sterling is playing with fire at Ci Siamo, the latest debut from Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group. Sterling launched the Italian restaurant, located inside Hudson Yards-adjacent development Manhattan West with pastas, wood-fired trout, and a blistered, caramelized onion torta that’s been turning heads. The dessert program, featuring gelati, sorbetti, and a chocolate amaro-filled bomboloni is overseen by lauded pastry chef Claudia Fleming.

A lineup of three gelatos scooped into stemmed glassware and resting on white saucers.
Ci Siamo’s gelati.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Café China

An assortment of dishes are strewn out on a table at Cafe China.
Cafe China is serving Sichuan classics alongside Cantonese dim sum.
Cafe China

Cafe China — an acclaimed Sichuan restaurant that held a Michelin star for seven years — temporarily shuttered for five months in 2021, and now has been reborn in a three-story brick building in Midtown. The chic restaurant, run by Xian Zhang and Yiming Wang, marries old menu favorites like cumin lamb and tea-smoked duck with new-guard entries like a whole steamed fish with cayenne and tabasco peppers, plus dim sum and other regional Chinese dishes.

An assortment of dishes are strewn out on a table at Cafe China.
Cafe China is serving Sichuan classics alongside Cantonese dim sum.
Cafe China

El Quijote

An overhead shot of a round dish of paella filled with rice and seafood.
Paella from El Quijote.
Eric Medsker/El Quijote

El Quijote’s return has been four years in the making, ever since the Hotel Chelsea shut down the storied spot for renovations in 2018. The Spanish restaurant has now been polished and revamped by the hip team behind Sunday in Brooklyn and partner Charles Seich. Seafood is the highlight here, from lobster grilled on a plancha and slicked in butter and sherry, to the restaurant’s impressive paella, now studded with squid, cockles, mussels, blue prawns, and rabbit.

An overhead shot of a round dish of paella filled with rice and seafood.
Paella from El Quijote.
Eric Medsker/El Quijote

Mel's

The empty interior of a new restaurant with a tiled front walkway and bar to the left.
The dining room at Mel’s.
Adrian Gaut/Mel’s

The first step in the next chapter at 85 10th Avenue — the former home of lauded-yet-troubled Italian destination Del Posto — has arrived. Executive chef Melissa Rodriguez is running the show at Mel’s, a weeknight hangout with wood-fired pizza, grilled steaks, and overflowing sundae cups. It’s the more casual counterpart to Rodriguez’s forthcoming fine dining restaurant Al Coro and cocktail bar Discolo, also in the same space.

The empty interior of a new restaurant with a tiled front walkway and bar to the left.
The dining room at Mel’s.
Adrian Gaut/Mel’s

Oiji Mi

Two pieces of foie gras, blanketed in a brown sauce and adorned with flowers.
Oiji Mi’s foie gras.
Christian Harder/Oiji Mi

Add Oiji Mi to the running list of restaurants offering tasting menus for around $100. The one served here — priced at $125 for five courses — highlights modern Korean inventions like foie gras with bokbunja (a Korean fruit wine) and deconstructed bo ssam with oysters and pork belly. Despite the early buzz, there’s plenty of reservations at this 80-seat Flatiron restaurant, which comes from the team behind acclaimed modern Korean restaurant Oiji, in the East Village.

Two pieces of foie gras, blanketed in a brown sauce and adorned with flowers.
Oiji Mi’s foie gras.
Christian Harder/Oiji Mi

Rowdy Rooster

A takeout container filled with pieces of fried chicken against a black background.
Fried chicken from Rowdy Rooster.
Paul McDonough/Rowdy Rooster

The hotshots behind one of America’s best new restaurants of 2021 are not slowing down. In their latest debut, restaurateur Roni Mazumdar and chef Chintan Pandya are frying up crunchy, spicy fried chicken familiar in India and transplanting it to the East Village. The tiny shop is churning out fried chicken at three different spice levels, plus chicken sandwiches with scallion yogurt and mint chutney, and sides including crispy eggplant or potato pakoras, masala corn, and tomato rice. For vegetarians, the snack-sized vado pao — a spiced potato patty with mint and tamarind chutney on a buttered pao roll — is an equally spicy hit.

A takeout container filled with pieces of fried chicken against a black background.
Fried chicken from Rowdy Rooster.
Paul McDonough/Rowdy Rooster

Librae Bakery

A croissant decorated with rose and pistachio crumbles sits on a stylish plate on a marble counter.
A pistachio rose croissant from Librae Bakery.
Librae Bakery

Middle Eastern, Danish, and New York influences have converged at Librae, a bakery and coffee shop that opened in May with espresso-glazed croissants and sourdough breads made with fermented Bahrani dates. Owner Dona Murad runs the shop with her husband Andre Gerschel, and her mother helps out with some of the baking, she says. Murad also runs a bakery and coffee roastery in Bahrain, and Gerschel has opened restaurants around the Middle East and U.K. “We’ve lived around the world and we wanted to bring that energy to this space,” Murad says.

A croissant decorated with rose and pistachio crumbles sits on a stylish plate on a marble counter.
A pistachio rose croissant from Librae Bakery.
Librae Bakery

Nudibranch

A white bowl with a mushroom dish in it with an egg yolk
Shaoxing mushrooms at Nudibranch.
Nudibranch

A trio of Momofuku alums — Jeff Kim, Matthew Lee, and Victor Xia — started Nudibranch as a pop-up, a place where they could cook dishes that drew upon their collective experiences working at the David Chang restaurant group and other restaurants across town. Last month, they found a permanent home for their cooking in the East Village, where the $75 prix fixe menu leans heavily on traditional Asian ingredients in dishes like soba showered with shavings of bottarga; cauliflower paired with a Vietnamese dipping sauce and Chinese sausage; and fried frog legs topped with a medley of herbs like lemongrass and galangal.

A white bowl with a mushroom dish in it with an egg yolk
Shaoxing mushrooms at Nudibranch.
Nudibranch

Bar Tulix

Seafood and vegetables are laid out on white plates, showcasing the menu offerings at Bar Tulix.
A spread of dishes at Bar Tulix.
Alexander Stein/Bar Tulix

Justin Bazdarich, the chef and owner behind Oxomoco, trendy pizza spot Speedy Romeo, and the short-lived vegan Mexican spot Xilonen, has partnered with veteran restaurateur John McDonald to open Bar Tulix, a Mexican-leaning seafood restaurant in Soho. The bar program nods heavily to tequila and mezcal, while the upscale menu ranges from shrimp cocktail tostadas to patatas bravas with pickled chiles and black sea bass crusted in masa.

Seafood and vegetables are laid out on white plates, showcasing the menu offerings at Bar Tulix.
A spread of dishes at Bar Tulix.
Alexander Stein/Bar Tulix

L’Abeille

A restaurant dining room with velvet green banquettes and tables flanked by blue velvet seats.
L’Abeille’s dining room.
Nicole Franzen/L’Abeille

Chef Mitsunobu Nagae, a Joël Robuchon veteran, has stepped out on his own at L’Abeille, a French fine dining spot that Nagae threads together with a few Japanese touches. The seasonal $185 tasting menu has included red miso-glazed squab and a pan-fried tile fish with fennel puree. (An a la carte menu is available at the bar and main dining room.) The refined, jewel-toned Tribeca space was built around the concept of “bistronomy,” where fine dining and bistro sensibilities meet.

A restaurant dining room with velvet green banquettes and tables flanked by blue velvet seats.
L’Abeille’s dining room.
Nicole Franzen/L’Abeille

Wan Wan

An overhead shot of a pile of crispy chicken skin strips set on a white plate with a green banana leaf laid down the middle. A lime wedge is on the side of the plate.
Wan Wan’s nung gai tod.
Andrew Bui/Wan Wan

The reliable team behind stylish downtown hits including Kimika and Wayla have added another restaurant to the fold: Wan Wan, a regional Thai restaurant that hones in on the food of the country’s famed island destination Phuket. Chef Tom Naumsuwan — who is also the executive chef at Wayla — oversees the menu at Wan Wan, which includes appetizers like nung gai tod, a tangle of crispy chicken skin tossed in garlic and sea salt, and hearty main dishes including sen pla, a bowl of fish noodles served with seared branzino.

An overhead shot of a pile of crispy chicken skin strips set on a white plate with a green banana leaf laid down the middle. A lime wedge is on the side of the plate.
Wan Wan’s nung gai tod.
Andrew Bui/Wan Wan

Mena

A spread of wine glasses, silverware, and colorful, round dishes plated with food, laid out on a light circular table.
A spread of dishes from Mena.
Daniel Krieger/Mena

Chef Victoria Blamey attracted plenty of headlines during high-profile tenures at storied pub Chumley’s and Manhattan fine dining institution Gotham Bar and Grill. Now, she’s stepping outside of any well-known restaurant’s shadow. Mena, named after Blamey’s great aunt, highlights the chef’s Chilean roots with a seafood and vegetable-heavy menu that’s threaded with hits from Blamey’s recent pop-up residences, including cholgas secas, featuring smoke-dried mussels coated with an onion glaze.

A spread of wine glasses, silverware, and colorful, round dishes plated with food, laid out on a light circular table.
A spread of dishes from Mena.
Daniel Krieger/Mena

Mott Street Eatery