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An overhead photograph of a tray of grilled skewers.
Sappe is a new restaurant in Chelsea from the team from Soothr.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

The Hottest New Restaurants in Manhattan, February 2024

Cote’s new chicken restaurant, a Thai skewers bar, and a Mexican tasting menu spot join the list this month

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Sappe is a new restaurant in Chelsea from the team from Soothr.
| Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Eater editors get asked one question more than any other: Where should I eat right now? Here, we’ve put together a map of the latest Manhattan debuts drawing NYC’s dining obsessives.

New to the list in February: Coqodaq, a fried chicken spot from the Michelin-starred Cote team; Corima a Mexican tasting menu from an alum of Contra; and Sappe, Thai skewers from Soothr.

For more New York dining recommendations, check out the new hotspots in Brooklyn and Queens.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Café Chelsea

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Café Chelsea is a French restaurant at Hotel Chelsea that opened last year. It’s spread out over two rooms, with chandeliers, tiled floors, and banquettes that might remind you of Balthazar. The menu serves bistro staples — roast chicken, steak frites — and a few dishes that break the rules, like a “maitake au poivre,” with mushrooms instead of steak, and ravioles du Dauphiné, a rectangular sheet of ravioli that’s common in Paris but rare in New York. The restaurant is open for daytime and nightly service.

The bar at Café Chelsea, a new restaurant at the Chelsea Hotel.
Café Chelsea opened at the Chelsea Hotel in July.
Annie Schlechter/Café Chelsea

Coqodaq

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Leave it to the team behind the Michelin-starred steakhouse Cote to open New York City’s most lavish temple to fried chicken. (In fact, the space itself resembles a clubby worship house of sorts). You can definitely ball out here (there are 800 tins of caviar and a list of 400 Champagnes rumored to be the largest in the country), but the menu is also plenty flexible to those looking for affordability. The Bucket List is a $38 set with the star fried chicken that comes with many dipping sauce options and banchan.

Coqodaq, a Korean fried chicken restaurant with high, vaulted ceilings.
Coqodaq. from the team behind Cote, specializes in fried chicken.
Coqodaq

In 2020, Soothr opened in the East Village with some of the more thrilling Thai food the city had seen in years. Now, the trio of owners have debuted Sappe, a restaurant that focuses on skewers. There are 12 options —  pork belly, intestine, squid, and more — cooked over Japanese charcoal grills. The lively, neon-coated feel of the interiors makes the spot a good pre-game option. Beware: cocktails can add up with one option on the list priced at an eye-popping $27.

Two hands hold skewers on a crowded table with raw crab, duck salad, and grilled quail.
Sappe opened from the Soothr team.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Bangkok Supper Club

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This sequel from the Fish Cheeks team is a hit, according to Eater’s critic Robert Sietsema. In a first look review, he said the restaurant “outdid itself” pointing to dishes like the garlic rice that he says are “to die for.” The kitchen, which centers around a charcoal grill, churns out dishes by Bangkok native Max Wittawat that concentrate on Bangkok street food with innovative twists.

Sage-colored booths in a restaurant.
Bangkok Supper Club’s booth seating.
Evan Sung/Bangkok Supper Club

Cecchi's

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Cecchi’s is a place “that makes everyone feel like a regular,” says Eater’s critic, Robert Sietsema. The new restaurant, which took over the old home of Café Loup, has a supper club atmosphere: Small tables draped in white tablecloths are crowded together in a low-lit dining room, with upholstered booths for larger groups. The restaurant calls itself an American bistro. It serves ribs, chicken a la king, and one of the best burgers in town at the moment.

The dining room at Cecchi’s.
The dining room at Cecchi’s.
Cecchi’s

Libertine

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In a wave of new French restaurants, Libertine is the bistro we’ve been waiting for. The restaurant serves simple-sounding dishes — sausage with mashed potatoes, scallops with seaweed — that “are a joy to eat,” writes Eater’s critic, Robert Sietsema. The jambon persille is a slice of pork and bright green jelly, and the oeufs mayo consists of boiled eggs in a bowl of fresh, foamy mayonnaise. The corner restaurant has a short bar with red stools and many, well-spaced small tables. It’s no wonder it was a winner on our Eater Awards list for 2023.

A sausage drapes mashed potatoes.
A pork sausage with mashed potatoes at Libertine.
Evan Sung/Libertine

Junoon, one of the country’s first Indian restaurants to earn a Michelin star, has opened a follow-up: Jazba. The new East Village spot is more casual than its tasting menu sibling, with dishes that take inspiration, and in some cases are replications, of the the team’s favorite street food spots in India. Eater critic Robert Sietsema enjoyed his meal, pointing to favorites like the green chile bone-in chicken, and “vowing to return.”

An overhead photograph of a mutton chop on a bone with sides and roti.
Jazba has opened from the team behind Junoon.
Alex Lau/Jazba

Figure Eight

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This restaurant opened at the end of 2023, from the team behind neighboring Silver Apricot. At Figure Eight, American Southern and Chinese flavors meld together for a menu that feels distinctly its own. There are turnip cake tots with shrimp ketchup, starfruit salad with tofu, collard greens with pork belly, and fried skate with buttermilk ranch and chile crisp. Much of the menu includes seafood, a nod to the storefront’s former tenant Pearl Oyster Bar.

Hamburger America

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Hamburger expert George Motz serves one of the most talked-about-burgers in town. He recently teamed up with the team behind Schnipper’s to open this sunny yellow luncheonette with a burger “America deserves.” Beyond the smash burger and Motz Burger (with fried onions) available, there’s the off-menu Chester, as well as wedges of pie, coffee, and chocolate chip cookies.

A hand holds a burger aloft, splayed so the ingredients can be seen, patty, pickles, and cheese.
A Hamburger America burger.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Roscioli

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One of the biggest names in Rome’s food scene opened a restaurant in Manhattan last year. Roscioli, a restaurant and wine bar, took over a townhouse in Soho that used to be home to the tasting menu spot Niche Niche — it’s the restaurant group’s first location outside of Rome. Downstairs, the wine cellar serves a $130 per person tasting menu, while a newly unveiled upstairs salumeria with a sit-down restaurant offers a la carte snacking options.

Pasta with a wine glass.
Roscioli downstairs has a tasting menu; upstairs is a deli-restaurant.
Cole Wilson/Eater NY

Hen House

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Antony Nassif made a name for himself with a Smorgasburg stand, where he built an audience for his Lebanese wraps. As of this winter, he debuted an East Village storefront, where you can find the dish and much more. The fast-casual restaurant is also intended to help bring back late-night dining in New York, after seeing the options go dark during the pandemic. An after-hours menu includes items like lamb shawarma poutine.

A Lebanese wrap from Hen House, split in half.
A wrap at the Lebanese Hen House.
Alex Stein/Hen House

Superiority Burger

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When Superiority Burger reopened, GQ called it the “buzziest restaurant in America,” before becoming Eater NY’s “restaurant of the year” for 2023. The restaurant started as a vegetarian burger counter on East Ninth Street; it closed in 2021 and moved to this larger space on Avenue A with lots of seating, a full bar, and late-night hours. The burger is still excellent, but the yuba verde sandwich stuffed with greens and tofu skin, as well as the collard greens on focaccia, are even better. There are always specials to be found to keep coming back here interesting. Be sure to save room for the excellent desserts.

A spread from Superiority Burger in the East Village.
Superiority Burger serves martinis and vegetarian sandwiches.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Chef Fidel Caballero is an alum of Contra and elements of that job emanate in the design of Corima, a minimalist dining room with tiling and exposed brick. Caballero’s menu nods to Northern Mexico, with some Japanese influence split between two distinct menus. In the back, there’s a $98 per person tasting menu with dishes like udon made with cornhusk dashi. In the front, there’s a more casual a la carte serving a duck taquiza with a banchan set-up and chocolate flan for dessert.

Udon made with a cornhusk dashi.
Udon made with cornhusk dashi at Corima.
Jovani Demetrie/Corima

Tolo is the breakout restaurant from Ron Yan, the chef of Parcelle wine bar down the street. Dark and sexy, the restaurant is ideal for a date night. Rice noodles and XO sauce, salt and pepper tofu, and seaweed fries that come in a paper bag make up the starters list, and well-portioned entrees like sweet-and-sour fish and Typhoon Shelter fried chicken are made to pair with its expert wine list.

Rice noodles at Tolo.
Rice noodles at Tolo.
Matt Dutile/Tolo

Metropolis by Marcus Samuelsson

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Located inside the new $500 million Perelman Performing Arts Center near One World Trade is celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson’s new restaurant. As the name suggests, the restaurant takes New York City itself as inspiration, hoping to approximate the various boroughs' culinary traditions, remixed in a fine dining context, such as an oyster dish nodding to Flushing.

A sleek, modernist taupe and rust colored dining room.
Metropolis is located inside of the Performing Arts Center.
Adrian Gaut/Metropolis

Café Chelsea

Café Chelsea is a French restaurant at Hotel Chelsea that opened last year. It’s spread out over two rooms, with chandeliers, tiled floors, and banquettes that might remind you of Balthazar. The menu serves bistro staples — roast chicken, steak frites — and a few dishes that break the rules, like a “maitake au poivre,” with mushrooms instead of steak, and ravioles du Dauphiné, a rectangular sheet of ravioli that’s common in Paris but rare in New York. The restaurant is open for daytime and nightly service.

The bar at Café Chelsea, a new restaurant at the Chelsea Hotel.
Café Chelsea opened at the Chelsea Hotel in July.
Annie Schlechter/Café Chelsea

Coqodaq

Leave it to the team behind the Michelin-starred steakhouse Cote to open New York City’s most lavish temple to fried chicken. (In fact, the space itself resembles a clubby worship house of sorts). You can definitely ball out here (there are 800 tins of caviar and a list of 400 Champagnes rumored to be the largest in the country), but the menu is also plenty flexible to those looking for affordability. The Bucket List is a $38 set with the star fried chicken that comes with many dipping sauce options and banchan.

Coqodaq, a Korean fried chicken restaurant with high, vaulted ceilings.
Coqodaq. from the team behind Cote, specializes in fried chicken.
Coqodaq

Sappe

In 2020, Soothr opened in the East Village with some of the more thrilling Thai food the city had seen in years. Now, the trio of owners have debuted Sappe, a restaurant that focuses on skewers. There are 12 options —  pork belly, intestine, squid, and more — cooked over Japanese charcoal grills. The lively, neon-coated feel of the interiors makes the spot a good pre-game option. Beware: cocktails can add up with one option on the list priced at an eye-popping $27.

Two hands hold skewers on a crowded table with raw crab, duck salad, and grilled quail.
Sappe opened from the Soothr team.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Bangkok Supper Club

This sequel from the Fish Cheeks team is a hit, according to Eater’s critic Robert Sietsema. In a first look review, he said the restaurant “outdid itself” pointing to dishes like the garlic rice that he says are “to die for.” The kitchen, which centers around a charcoal grill, churns out dishes by Bangkok native Max Wittawat that concentrate on Bangkok street food with innovative twists.

Sage-colored booths in a restaurant.
Bangkok Supper Club’s booth seating.
Evan Sung/Bangkok Supper Club

Cecchi's

Cecchi’s is a place “that makes everyone feel like a regular,” says Eater’s critic, Robert Sietsema. The new restaurant, which took over the old home of Café Loup, has a supper club atmosphere: Small tables draped in white tablecloths are crowded together in a low-lit dining room, with upholstered booths for larger groups. The restaurant calls itself an American bistro. It serves ribs, chicken a la king, and one of the best burgers in town at the moment.

The dining room at Cecchi’s.
The dining room at Cecchi’s.
Cecchi’s

Libertine

In a wave of new French restaurants, Libertine is the bistro we’ve been waiting for. The restaurant serves simple-sounding dishes — sausage with mashed potatoes, scallops with seaweed — that “are a joy to eat,” writes Eater’s critic, Robert Sietsema. The jambon persille is a slice of pork and bright green jelly, and the oeufs mayo consists of boiled eggs in a bowl of fresh, foamy mayonnaise. The corner restaurant has a short bar with red stools and many, well-spaced small tables. It’s no wonder it was a winner on our Eater Awards list for 2023.

A sausage drapes mashed potatoes.
A pork sausage with mashed potatoes at Libertine.
Evan Sung/Libertine

Jazba

Junoon, one of the country’s first Indian restaurants to earn a Michelin star, has opened a follow-up: Jazba. The new East Village spot is more casual than its tasting menu sibling, with dishes that take inspiration, and in some cases are replications, of the the team’s favorite street food spots in India. Eater critic Robert Sietsema enjoyed his meal, pointing to favorites like the green chile bone-in chicken, and “vowing to return.”

An overhead photograph of a mutton chop on a bone with sides and roti.
Jazba has opened from the team behind Junoon.
Alex Lau/Jazba

Figure Eight

This restaurant opened at the end of 2023, from the team behind neighboring Silver Apricot. At Figure Eight, American Southern and Chinese flavors meld together for a menu that feels distinctly its own. There are turnip cake tots with shrimp ketchup, starfruit salad with tofu, collard greens with pork belly, and fried skate with buttermilk ranch and chile crisp. Much of the menu includes seafood, a nod to the storefront’s former tenant Pearl Oyster Bar.

Hamburger America

Hamburger expert George Motz serves one of the most talked-about-burgers in town. He recently teamed up with the team behind Schnipper’s to open this sunny yellow luncheonette with a burger “America deserves.” Beyond the smash burger and Motz Burger (with fried onions) available, there’s the off-menu Chester, as well as wedges of pie, coffee, and chocolate chip cookies.

A hand holds a burger aloft, splayed so the ingredients can be seen, patty, pickles, and cheese.
A Hamburger America burger.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Roscioli

One of the biggest names in Rome’s food scene opened a restaurant in Manhattan last year. Roscioli, a restaurant and wine bar, took over a townhouse in Soho that used to be home to the tasting menu spot Niche Niche — it’s the restaurant group’s first location outside of Rome. Downstairs, the wine cellar serves a $130 per person tasting menu, while a newly unveiled upstairs salumeria with a sit-down restaurant offers a la carte snacking options.

Pasta with a wine glass.
Roscioli downstairs has a tasting menu; upstairs is a deli-restaurant.
Cole Wilson/Eater NY

Hen House

Antony Nassif made a name for himself with a Smorgasburg stand, where he built an audience for his Lebanese wraps. As of this winter, he debuted an East Village storefront, where you can find the dish and much more. The fast-casual restaurant is also intended to help bring back late-night dining in New York, after seeing the options go dark during the pandemic. An after-hours menu includes items like lamb shawarma poutine.

A Lebanese wrap from Hen House, split in half.
A wrap at the Lebanese Hen House.
Alex Stein/Hen House

Superiority Burger

When Superiority Burger reopened, GQ called it the “buzziest restaurant in America,” before becoming Eater NY’s “restaurant of the year” for 2023. The restaurant started as a vegetarian burger counter on East Ninth Street; it closed in 2021 and moved to this larger space on Avenue A with lots of seating, a full bar, and late-night hours. The burger is still excellent, but the yuba verde sandwich stuffed with greens and tofu skin, as well as the collard greens on focaccia, are even better. There are always specials to be found to keep coming back here interesting. Be sure to save room for the excellent desserts.

A spread from Superiority Burger in the East Village.
Superiority Burger serves martinis and vegetarian sandwiches.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Corima

Chef Fidel Caballero is an alum of Contra and elements of that job emanate in the design of Corima, a minimalist dining room with tiling and exposed brick. Caballero’s menu nods to Northern Mexico, with some Japanese influence split between two distinct menus. In the back, there’s a $98 per person tasting menu with dishes like udon made with cornhusk dashi. In the front, there’s a more casual a la carte serving a duck taquiza with a banchan set-up and chocolate flan for dessert.

Udon made with a cornhusk dashi.
Udon made with cornhusk dashi at Corima.
Jovani Demetrie/Corima

Tolo

Tolo is the breakout restaurant from Ron Yan, the chef of Parcelle wine bar down the street. Dark and sexy, the restaurant is ideal for a date night. Rice noodles and XO sauce, salt and pepper tofu, and seaweed fries that come in a paper bag make up the starters list, and well-portioned entrees like sweet-and-sour fish and Typhoon Shelter fried chicken are made to pair with its expert wine list.

Rice noodles at Tolo.
Rice noodles at Tolo.
Matt Dutile/Tolo

Metropolis by Marcus Samuelsson

Located inside the new $500 million Perelman Performing Arts Center near One World Trade is celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson’s new restaurant. As the name suggests, the restaurant takes New York City itself as inspiration, hoping to approximate the various boroughs' culinary traditions, remixed in a fine dining context, such as an oyster dish nodding to Flushing.

A sleek, modernist taupe and rust colored dining room.
Metropolis is located inside of the Performing Arts Center.
Adrian Gaut/Metropolis

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