clock menu more-arrow no yes
Tuna crudo from Pastis
Tuna crudo from Pastis
Louise Palmberg/Eater

The Hottest Restaurants in Manhattan Right Now, July 2019

A legendary French bistro resurrection and a chic new Thai restaurant join the list

View as Map
Tuna crudo from Pastis
| Photo by Louise Palmberg/Eater

Eater editors get asked one question more than any other: Where should I eat right now? NYC dining obsessives want to know what’s new, what’s hot, and what is going to be the next big hit in the greatest dining city on earth. So here it is, a guide to the hottest restaurants in Manhattan this month.

July adds include: Pastis (the return of a Meatpacking District legend), Lamalo (a Middle Eastern restaurant that makes dips the star), and Wayla (a chic new Thai restaurant with a idyllic backyard on the LES).

For more New York dining recommendations, check out the new hotspots in Brooklyn and Queens; the Eater 38 lists the essential long-standing restaurants in town.

For all the latest New York dining intel, subscribe to Eater NY's newsletter.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Le Jardinier

Copy Link
610 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022
(212) 451-9211
Visit Website

After 21 years of working under the late Joël Robuchon, chef Alain Verzeroli is putting his own spin onto fine dining at Le Jardinier in Midtown East. It’s a touch more casual than the tasting menus that made his former mentor famous, with more attention to vegetables and light seasonal cooking. The menu will change, but options may include a poached white asparagus with a blood orange reduction, chicken with ramps, or a burrata, tomato, and stone fruit dish that’s laid out like abstract art. Desserts and breads are lighter too, and the wine list includes traditional Old World ones and newer, biodynamic ones. A more formal French-Japanese restaurant called Shun is now open in the space, too.

2. Hudson Yards

Copy Link
20 Hudson Yards, #501
New York, NY 10001
(616) 517-2699
Visit Website

Yes, a mall has managed to produce some of the hottest restaurants in NYC right now. Though most of them are not worth going to, it does have some gems: There’s David Chang’s Korean-ish Kawi, located on the fifth floor with kimbap, rice cakes, and stews from chef Jo Park. José Andrés’s streetside Spanish food hall Mercado Little Spain, with various counters for traditional Spanish fare from paella and patatas bravas to churros and charcuterie, has lots of vendors that are open. And for a chill hangout with affordable Greek wines and snacks, the Milos Wine Bar is the place to go — though best advice is to avoid its pricey upstairs sibling.

Disclosure: David Chang is producing shows for Hulu in partnership with Vox Media Studios, part of Eater’s parent company, Vox Media. No Eater staff member is involved in the production of those shows, and this does not impact coverage on Eater.

3. Lamalo

Copy Link
11 E 31st St
New York, NY 10016
(212) 660-2112
Visit Website

Midtown’s Arlo Nomad hotel restaurant is now Lamalo, a Middle Eastern restaurant from Breads Bakery owner Gadi Peleg. Meals start with mezze-style dishes, where a spread of dips and salads accompany an oblong flatbread called Jerusalem laffa. Bigger options such as a grilled whole fish and slow-roasted short rib on the bone are available at dinner, and per the casual vibe, the drink menu includes big cocktails meant for sharing, like a $55 one with Arak, grapefruit, lemon, and mint one intended for five people. The culinary team is led by Ofir Horesh, a chef who previously worked at Peleg’s stand-out Middle Eastern restaurant Nur. Lamalo is also open for breakfast, with lunch to come.

Lamalo Francesco Sapienza/Lamalo [Official Photo]

4. Bourke Street Bakery

Copy Link
15 E 28th St
New York, NY 10016
(917) 675-6394
Visit Website

Australian bakery and cafe chain Bourke Street Bakery landed in Nomad with a bang, with co-founding baker Paul Allam and Jessica Grynberg, his wife, moving to New York for the first international outpost of the Sydney legend. Open starting at 7 a.m., the 50-seat, counter-service cafe serves toasts, sandwiches like a vegetarian reuben and a muffaletta, and a rotating selection of salads, as well as coffee and natural wine. Try a sausage roll, a savory pastry that helped make Bourke Street famous in Australia, or any of the pastries and tarts. But the robust selection of sourdough breads, baked fresh throughout the day, roots the place. Options such as a seeded sourdough are available to take home.

Bourke Street Bakery Gary He/Eater

5. Pastis

Copy Link
52 Gansevoort St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 929-4844
Visit Website

One of the most important restaurants this century is back in action, still with the same signature Keith McNally golden lighting but with the addition of Stephen Starr on the team. The new Pastis — which helped turn the Meatpacking District into a celebrity-packed dining destination — is also more spacious, but it maintains a familiar menu of French brasserie fare, including charred steaks, fries, onion soups, and a special of the day. Waits at dinner have been wild, but getting a seat at the bar, where the full menu is served, is a little easier. It’s also open for breakfast and lunch, when primetime reservations are far easier to come by.

Pastis Louise Palmberg/Eater

6. Rezdôra

Copy Link
27 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003
(646) 692-9090
Visit Website

Italian restaurants open a lot in New York, but Rezdôra — from chef Stefano Secchi, an alum of three-Michelin-starred Osteria Francescana — offers a selection of specialties from the country that are lesser found in New York. Pastas and vegetable dishes come from Emilia-Romagna, and a $75-per-person pasta tasting, an a la carte menu, and cocktails are available. Early stand-outs include a gnocco fritto (fritters with charcuterie on top) and both a beef ragu and a duck ragu pasta. Though Secchi has a fine dining background, this Flatiron restaurant is supposed to be fairly casual. Go for one of the Italian wines.

Rezdora interior Robert Sietsema

7. Niche Niche

Copy Link
43 Macdougal St
New York, NY 10012

The team behind Greenwich Village hit Tokyo Record Bar has expanded with another experiential restaurant, this one in Soho and modeled after a dinner party. Owner Ariel Arce has recruited all her sommelier and winemaker friends — from places like Frenchette, Eleven Madison Park, and Charlie Bird — to come up with different themes and wines each night for $40 per person. Food is made to match for another $40 in the homey, 25-seat space. Just like at a dinner party, diners are encouraged to mingle and make friends. Don’t miss the dog wallpaper-lined bathroom.

8. Van Da

Copy Link
234 E 4th St
New York, NY 10009

Catering whiz Yen Ngo debuts this modern Vietnamese restaurant in the East Village, with food from Gramercy Tavern alum chef Hannah Wong that spotlights the cuisines of Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon), Hue, and Hanoi. Early standout dishes at Van Da include lemongrass beef tartare and a pho short rib grilled cheese, served in the downstairs 30-seat dining room. At street level is a lounge with cocktails that employ Vietnamese ingredients like lemongrass, kumquat, and tamarind.

Van Da Van Da [Official Photo]

9. Wayan

Copy Link
Read Review |
20 Spring St
New York, NY 10012
(917) 261-4388
Visit Website

Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s son Cedric Vongerichten has struck out with his wife Ochi at Wayan, a promising Indonesian-French restaurant in Nolita. The food is inspired by the couple’s connection to Indonesia, where Ochi is from, with dishes served family-style, pulling flavors from the Asian country while using French cooking techniques. Recommended dishes in the Vong-like space include satays, sambal-laced shrimp, and pandan custard for dessert.

10. Wayla

Copy Link
100 Forsyth St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 206-2500
Visit Website

Sleek Lower East Side Thai restaurant Wayla comes from Erika Chou and Tom Naumsuwan, a chef who created the menu based on his time working with Bangkok street vendors. Dishes could include sen chan pad lobster (lobster stir-fried noodles), larb play tod (fried whole-branzino), and a rotating curry dish. Drinks are from Anthony Bakery, who comes from cocktail powerhouses the Pool and the Aviary, and employ traditionally Thai ingredients. A Land of Smiles includes Thai chili, tamarind, cucumber, lemon sea salt, and tequila. Wayla also has a lovely backyard and is now open for brunch.

Wayla Wayla [Official]

11. Crown Shy

Copy Link
70 Pine St
New York, NY 10005
(212) 517-1932
Visit Website

The very pedigreed team of James Kent (formerly second-in-command at Eleven Madison Park) and Jeff Katz (managing director of Del Posto) debuted Crown Shy, a more casual endeavor in the Financial District. The a la carte menu traverses the world, including dishes like white bean hummus with nduja and puffed bread; cavatelli with chicken liver ragu and horseradish; and charred octopus with red rice and morcilla. Dessert like sticky toffee pudding is from Renata Ameni, former executive pastry chef at three-Michelin-starred California restaurant Manresa. It’s already proving to be an industry favorite.

Crown Shy Chris Payne for Crown Shy [Official Photo]

12. The Fulton

Copy Link
89 South St
New York, NY 10038
(212) 838-1200
Visit Website

Empire builder Jean-Georges Vongerichten has opened his first seafood restaurant at the historic South Street Seaport, a waterside restaurant called the Fulton. With more than 100 seats and an outdoor patio, the two-level restaurant focuses on the vista outside — a clear view of the East River and the Brooklyn Bridge. Food-wise, Vongerichten pays homage to the former Fulton Fish Market. Salmon crusted with spices, fish and chips, and snapper ceviche are among the seafood options, though non-seafood crowdpleasers like a cheeseburger are also available. With warm weather, a seat outside will be prime.

The Fulton Alex Staniloff/Eater

Loading comments...

1. Le Jardinier

610 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10022

After 21 years of working under the late Joël Robuchon, chef Alain Verzeroli is putting his own spin onto fine dining at Le Jardinier in Midtown East. It’s a touch more casual than the tasting menus that made his former mentor famous, with more attention to vegetables and light seasonal cooking. The menu will change, but options may include a poached white asparagus with a blood orange reduction, chicken with ramps, or a burrata, tomato, and stone fruit dish that’s laid out like abstract art. Desserts and breads are lighter too, and the wine list includes traditional Old World ones and newer, biodynamic ones. A more formal French-Japanese restaurant called Shun is now open in the space, too.

610 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10022

2. Hudson Yards

20 Hudson Yards, #501, New York, NY 10001

Yes, a mall has managed to produce some of the hottest restaurants in NYC right now. Though most of them are not worth going to, it does have some gems: There’s David Chang’s Korean-ish Kawi, located on the fifth floor with kimbap, rice cakes, and stews from chef Jo Park. José Andrés’s streetside Spanish food hall Mercado Little Spain, with various counters for traditional Spanish fare from paella and patatas bravas to churros and charcuterie, has lots of vendors that are open. And for a chill hangout with affordable Greek wines and snacks, the Milos Wine Bar is the place to go — though best advice is to avoid its pricey upstairs sibling.

Disclosure: David Chang is producing shows for Hulu in partnership with Vox Media Studios, part of Eater’s parent company, Vox Media. No Eater staff member is involved in the production of those shows, and this does not impact coverage on Eater.

20 Hudson Yards, #501
New York, NY 10001

3. Lamalo

11 E 31st St, New York, NY 10016
Lamalo Francesco Sapienza/Lamalo [Official Photo]

Midtown’s Arlo Nomad hotel restaurant is now Lamalo, a Middle Eastern restaurant from Breads Bakery owner Gadi Peleg. Meals start with mezze-style dishes, where a spread of dips and salads accompany an oblong flatbread called Jerusalem laffa. Bigger options such as a grilled whole fish and slow-roasted short rib on the bone are available at dinner, and per the casual vibe, the drink menu includes big cocktails meant for sharing, like a $55 one with Arak, grapefruit, lemon, and mint one intended for five people. The culinary team is led by Ofir Horesh, a chef who previously worked at Peleg’s stand-out Middle Eastern restaurant Nur. Lamalo is also open for breakfast, with lunch to come.

11 E 31st St
New York, NY 10016

4. Bourke Street Bakery

15 E 28th St, New York, NY 10016
Bourke Street Bakery Gary He/Eater

Australian bakery and cafe chain Bourke Street Bakery landed in Nomad with a bang, with co-founding baker Paul Allam and Jessica Grynberg, his wife, moving to New York for the first international outpost of the Sydney legend. Open starting at 7 a.m., the 50-seat, counter-service cafe serves toasts, sandwiches like a vegetarian reuben and a muffaletta, and a rotating selection of salads, as well as coffee and natural wine. Try a sausage roll, a savory pastry that helped make Bourke Street famous in Australia, or any of the pastries and tarts. But the robust selection of sourdough breads, baked fresh throughout the day, roots the place. Options such as a seeded sourdough are available to take home.

15 E 28th St
New York, NY 10016

5. Pastis

52 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014
Pastis Louise Palmberg/Eater

One of the most important restaurants this century is back in action, still with the same signature Keith McNally golden lighting but with the addition of Stephen Starr on the team. The new Pastis — which helped turn the Meatpacking District into a celebrity-packed dining destination — is also more spacious, but it maintains a familiar menu of French brasserie fare, including charred steaks, fries, onion soups, and a special of the day. Waits at dinner have been wild, but getting a seat at the bar, where the full menu is served, is a little easier. It’s also open for breakfast and lunch, when primetime reservations are far easier to come by.

52 Gansevoort St
New York, NY 10014

6. Rezdôra

27 E 20th St, New York, NY 10003
Rezdora interior Robert Sietsema

Italian restaurants open a lot in New York, but Rezdôra — from chef Stefano Secchi, an alum of three-Michelin-starred Osteria Francescana — offers a selection of specialties from the country that are lesser found in New York. Pastas and vegetable dishes come from Emilia-Romagna, and a $75-per-person pasta tasting, an a la carte menu, and cocktails are available. Early stand-outs include a gnocco fritto (fritters with charcuterie on top) and both a beef ragu and a duck ragu pasta. Though Secchi has a fine dining background, this Flatiron restaurant is supposed to be fairly casual. Go for one of the Italian wines.

27 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003

7. Niche Niche

43 Macdougal St, New York, NY 10012

The team behind Greenwich Village hit Tokyo Record Bar has expanded with another experiential restaurant, this one in Soho and modeled after a dinner party. Owner Ariel Arce has recruited all her sommelier and winemaker friends — from places like Frenchette, Eleven Madison Park, and Charlie Bird — to come up with different themes and wines each night for $40 per person. Food is made to match for another $40 in the homey, 25-seat space. Just like at a dinner party, diners are encouraged to mingle and make friends. Don’t miss the dog wallpaper-lined bathroom.

43 Macdougal St
New York, NY 10012

8. Van Da

234 E 4th St, New York, NY 10009
Van Da Van Da [Official Photo]

Catering whiz Yen Ngo debuts this modern Vietnamese restaurant in the East Village, with food from Gramercy Tavern alum chef Hannah Wong that spotlights the cuisines of Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon), Hue, and Hanoi. Early standout dishes at Van Da include lemongrass beef tartare and a pho short rib grilled cheese, served in the downstairs 30-seat dining room. At street level is a lounge with cocktails that employ Vietnamese ingredients like lemongrass, kumquat, and tamarind.

234 E 4th St
New York, NY 10009

9. Wayan

20 Spring St, New York, NY 10012
Read Review |

Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s son Cedric Vongerichten has struck out with his wife Ochi at Wayan, a promising Indonesian-French restaurant in Nolita. The food is inspired by the couple’s connection to Indonesia, where Ochi is from, with dishes served family-style, pulling flavors from the Asian country while using French cooking techniques. Recommended dishes in the Vong-like space include satays, sambal-laced shrimp, and pandan custard for dessert.

20 Spring St
New York, NY 10012

10. Wayla

100 Forsyth St, New York, NY 10002
Wayla Wayla [Official]

Sleek Lower East Side Thai restaurant Wayla comes from Erika Chou and Tom Naumsuwan, a chef who created the menu based on his time working with Bangkok street vendors. Dishes could include sen chan pad lobster (lobster stir-fried noodles), larb play tod (fried whole-branzino), and a rotating curry dish. Drinks are from Anthony Bakery, who comes from cocktail powerhouses the Pool and the Aviary, and employ traditionally Thai ingredients. A Land of Smiles includes Thai chili, tamarind, cucumber, lemon sea salt, and tequila. Wayla also has a lovely backyard and is now open for brunch.

100 Forsyth St
New York, NY 10002

11. Crown Shy

70 Pine St, New York, NY 10005
Crown Shy Chris Payne for Crown Shy [Official Photo]

The very pedigreed team of James Kent (formerly second-in-command at Eleven Madison Park) and Jeff Katz (managing director of Del Posto) debuted Crown Shy, a more casual endeavor in the Financial District. The a la carte menu traverses the world, including dishes like white bean hummus with nduja and puffed bread; cavatelli with chicken liver ragu and horseradish; and charred octopus with red rice and morcilla. Dessert like sticky toffee pudding is from Renata Ameni, former executive pastry chef at three-Michelin-starred California restaurant Manresa. It’s already proving to be an industry favorite.

70 Pine St
New York, NY 10005

12. The Fulton

89 South St, New York, NY 10038
The Fulton Alex Staniloff/Eater

Empire builder Jean-Georges Vongerichten has opened his first seafood restaurant at the historic South Street Seaport, a waterside restaurant called the Fulton. With more than 100 seats and an outdoor patio, the two-level restaurant focuses on the vista outside — a clear view of the East River and the Brooklyn Bridge. Food-wise, Vongerichten pays homage to the former Fulton Fish Market. Salmon crusted with spices, fish and chips, and snapper ceviche are among the seafood options, though non-seafood crowdpleasers like a cheeseburger are also available. With warm weather, a seat outside will be prime.

89 South St
New York, NY 10038

Related Maps