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The 15 Hottest New Restaurants in Manhattan, February 2023

An Italian restaurant by Roberta’s and an ice cream bar from Wildair and Contra alums make this month’s list

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Eater editors get asked one question more than any other: Where should I eat right now? Here, we’ve put together a map of the latest Manhattan debuts drawing NYC’s dining obsessives.

New to the list in February: Foul Witch, a pasta restaurant from the Roberta’s team, Playita, a new Downtown counter for fish tacos; Ariari, a Korean restaurant specializing in raw seafood from Hand Hospitality, and Caleta, a small plates bar with ice cream from Wildair and Contra alums.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

For more New York dining recommendations, check out the new hotspots in Brooklyn and Queens.

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Tatiana by Kwame Onwuachi

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Top Chef star, Kwame Onwuachi, who opened two shortlived fine-dining establishments in Washington D.C., returned to his hometown New York City to open his first restaurant here. Tatiana, which debuted in early November, is the crown jewel restaurant inside of the  $550 million overhaul at Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall. Onwuachi pays homage to his Bronx roots, with a menu that includes a crudo-style escovitch, a truffle chopped cheese, and patties, in a high-end dining room with color-changing cloud pendants.

A shallow bowl with halves of grapes, radish, and other vegetables and fruits.
Tatiana is Kwame Onwuachi’s first NYC restaurant.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Urban Hawker

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From conception to completion, this new food court between Times Square and Rockefeller Center took several years — and involved Anthony Bourdain’s input — to try to replicate the feel of a hawker food mall in Singapore. From an eventual collection of vendors, the counters include Hainan Jones (Hainanese chicken, steamed or fried), Mr. Fried Rice (stingray fried rice), and Mamak’s Corner (Indian food as served in Singapore). Oh, and there’s a full bar specializing in gin drinks at the 51st Street entrance.

Pale slice chicken on rice served in a white styrofoam container.
Hainanese chicken at Hainan Jones.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Five Acres NYC

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Greg Baxtrom made a name for himself in Prospect Heights with Olmsted, his fine-dining restaurant, followed by his more casual Japanese French Maison Yaki, and family-friendly comfort joint Patti Ann’s. He now has his first Manhattan restaurant, the latest marquis spot to debut in buzzy Rockefeller Center, with plenty of smoke-show drama, in cloche-reveal dishes like the oysters Vanderbilt and the s’mores dessert.

Oysters with cloche filled with smoke.
Smoke-show drama at Five Acres.
Scott Semler/Eater NY

Jupiter

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Named for the Roman god equivalent of Zeus, Jupiter overlooks the statue of Prometheus on the skating rink level of Rockefeller Center. The restaurant, which opened in late November, comes from the team behind Soho’s King restaurant. The focus here is regional Italian pastas, with the team’s signature British flair.

A green pasta dish at Jupiter.
A pasta dish at Jupiter.
Melanie Landsman/Eater NY

Hav & Mar

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Chef Marcus Samuelsson opened his first New York City restaurant in almost a decade in November. The menu, which emphasizes seafood, highlights the Swedish and Ethiopian flavors Samuelsson grew up with, dressed up in a 5,000 square-foot, 125-seat Chelsea restaurant, where mermaid motifs appear throughout. The chef says Hav & Mar, “is a reflection of Black joy and excellence.”

A midcentury collection of tables and chairs in a restaurant, overseen by a pair of black mermaids,
A mermaid theme appears throughout the interior design.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Eric Finkelstein and Matt Ross, owners of Court Street Grocers, have opened  S&P, located in the former home of Eisenberg’s, one of Manhattan’s last old-school lunch counters that closed during the pandemic. Here you won’t find much of a change on the menu aside from classics that are better than you remember them. They include tuna melts, peanut butter and bacon sandwiches, pastrami on rye, matzo ball soup, latkes, cheeseburgers, and egg cream.

A pastrami sandwich on a plate with a pickle.
The pastrami at S&P.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

One of the borough’s best new spots arrived last summer in the form of Claud. This restaurant masquerading as a neighborhood wine bar found a fast following online with its escargot croquettes and massive slices of devil’s food cake. Both are good, but it gets better with the dishes spared from hype — the mille-feuille made with confit tomatoes and the tart agnolotti pasta stuffed with chicken liver are both must-orders.

An overhead photograph of hands tugging at bread and scooping vegetables from a bowl on a busy table.
Escargot croquettes, shrimp, and other dishes at Claud.
Teddy Wolff/Claud

Lord’s

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In this follow-up to fish-and-chips hit, Dame from Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard, look for British nose-to-tail fare, that Eater says is “gutsy.” Dishes rotate but might include pig’s head, scotch eggs, and meat pies of the day — seafood takes a backseat.

A golden, oblong meat pie covered in a golden pastry shell with other plates of food surrounding it.
A spread from Lord’s from chef Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Ariari is one of more than a dozen restaurants in the Hand Hospitality portfolio, replacing the team’s former East Village restaurant Oiji. At Ariari, raw seafood dishes take the stage, but there are also chicken skewers, lamb stuffed fried pepper, steamed monkfish, and spicy seafood udon noodles.

Fish served with lettuce wraps.
Fish served with lettuce wraps.
Ariari

Husband-wife duo Jesse Merchant Zuñiga and Javier Zuñiga, who met working at Wildair and Contra, debuted a headquarters for their ice cream brand, Bad Habit, last month. By day, containers are sold at the East Village establishment, and by night, they’re selling small plates, including a creamy mussels toast, as well as wine. They’re also offering spiffed up ice-cream based desserts like baked Alaska.

Orange mussel toast.
Mussel toast.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Torrisi Bar and Restaurant

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Torrisi Bar and Restaurant is a revival of sorts for Torrisi Italian Specialties — the Nolita restaurant which closed in 2015 — reborn in the historic Puck Building. Since its original incarnation, Major Food Group has been on a global expansion tear, bringing its theatrical red-sauce hits like Carbone to other cities. At Torrisi, the team attempts to keep things local by infusing some New York elements in dishes like chopped liver, but it mainly keeps to pasta.

Little Myanmar

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Burmese food has always been a rare find in NYC, but Little Myanmar is one of a handful of restaurants that spotlight the cuisine across the city. The family behind the operation famously started out with Yun Cafe, a tiny stall inside a subway station in Jackson Heights (which remains open). But in the East Village, Little Myanmar stretches out with more space (and with more equipment) and that’s clear in the menu: The restaurant boasts an extensive range of punchy salads, grilled skewers, and both subtle and spicy curries. Don’t miss the goat curry, which Eater critic Robert Sietsema praised as one of the best versions of the dish in the city.

A metal wok of dark red meat curry on the bottom right, with a plate of rice and cup of soup on the upper left.
Goat curry at Little Myanmar.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Foul Witch

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The Roberta’s team debuted its long-promised Italian restaurant and wine bar in the East Village last month. At the moment, no pizza is served, but you won’t miss it, when you try one of the several small plates of pasta, like veal tortellini or the goat garganelli. While Roberta’s fine dining restaurant Blanca remains closed, this is a more casual a la carte sibling.

Two plates, one with pasta the other with meat.
Goat garganelli.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Playita

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This new Lower East Side spot focuses on Mexican mariscos from Iris Avelar, who is also a co-owner of La Superior taqueria in Williamsburg. There are fish tacos, Mexican-style shrimp cocktails, and ceviche, but the carne asada tacos are so good they almost overshadow the seafood theme. Don’t miss vegetarian dishes like tortilla soup, either.

A small cup of tortilla soup is topped with crumbly cheese at Playita, a new Mexican restaurant on the Lower East Side.
Tortilla soup.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Tin Building by Jean-Georges

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Over eight years ago, chef and restaurateur Jean-Georges Vongerichten met with the president of the New York tri-state region for the Howard Hughes Corporation about opening a food destination in what had been the Fulton Street Fish Market in South Street Seaport. Today, they’ve opened a collection of six full-service restaurants, four bars, six counters, retail, and private dining in the entirely overhauled historic Tin Building. It includes an egg-focused morning spot, a bakery cafe, a sushi and sake bar, a brasserie, an oyster bar, a pizza spot, a vegan restaurant, a sit-down Chinese restaurant, a taqueria, and a dosa and crepes stand.

A photo of T Cafe in the ground level of the Tin Building from Jean-Georges Vongerichten.
T Cafe at the Tin Building.
Nicole Franzen

Tatiana by Kwame Onwuachi

Top Chef star, Kwame Onwuachi, who opened two shortlived fine-dining establishments in Washington D.C., returned to his hometown New York City to open his first restaurant here. Tatiana, which debuted in early November, is the crown jewel restaurant inside of the  $550 million overhaul at Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall. Onwuachi pays homage to his Bronx roots, with a menu that includes a crudo-style escovitch, a truffle chopped cheese, and patties, in a high-end dining room with color-changing cloud pendants.

A shallow bowl with halves of grapes, radish, and other vegetables and fruits.
Tatiana is Kwame Onwuachi’s first NYC restaurant.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Urban Hawker

From conception to completion, this new food court between Times Square and Rockefeller Center took several years — and involved Anthony Bourdain’s input — to try to replicate the feel of a hawker food mall in Singapore. From an eventual collection of vendors, the counters include Hainan Jones (Hainanese chicken, steamed or fried), Mr. Fried Rice (stingray fried rice), and Mamak’s Corner (Indian food as served in Singapore). Oh, and there’s a full bar specializing in gin drinks at the 51st Street entrance.

Pale slice chicken on rice served in a white styrofoam container.
Hainanese chicken at Hainan Jones.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Five Acres NYC

Greg Baxtrom made a name for himself in Prospect Heights with Olmsted, his fine-dining restaurant, followed by his more casual Japanese French Maison Yaki, and family-friendly comfort joint Patti Ann’s. He now has his first Manhattan restaurant, the latest marquis spot to debut in buzzy Rockefeller Center, with plenty of smoke-show drama, in cloche-reveal dishes like the oysters Vanderbilt and the s’mores dessert.

Oysters with cloche filled with smoke.
Smoke-show drama at Five Acres.
Scott Semler/Eater NY

Jupiter

Named for the Roman god equivalent of Zeus, Jupiter overlooks the statue of Prometheus on the skating rink level of Rockefeller Center. The restaurant, which opened in late November, comes from the team behind Soho’s King restaurant. The focus here is regional Italian pastas, with the team’s signature British flair.

A green pasta dish at Jupiter.
A pasta dish at Jupiter.
Melanie Landsman/Eater NY

Hav & Mar

Chef Marcus Samuelsson opened his first New York City restaurant in almost a decade in November. The menu, which emphasizes seafood, highlights the Swedish and Ethiopian flavors Samuelsson grew up with, dressed up in a 5,000 square-foot, 125-seat Chelsea restaurant, where mermaid motifs appear throughout. The chef says Hav & Mar, “is a reflection of Black joy and excellence.”

A midcentury collection of tables and chairs in a restaurant, overseen by a pair of black mermaids,
A mermaid theme appears throughout the interior design.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

S&P

Eric Finkelstein and Matt Ross, owners of Court Street Grocers, have opened  S&P, located in the former home of Eisenberg’s, one of Manhattan’s last old-school lunch counters that closed during the pandemic. Here you won’t find much of a change on the menu aside from classics that are better than you remember them. They include tuna melts, peanut butter and bacon sandwiches, pastrami on rye, matzo ball soup, latkes, cheeseburgers, and egg cream.

A pastrami sandwich on a plate with a pickle.
The pastrami at S&P.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Claud

One of the borough’s best new spots arrived last summer in the form of Claud. This restaurant masquerading as a neighborhood wine bar found a fast following online with its escargot croquettes and massive slices of devil’s food cake. Both are good, but it gets better with the dishes spared from hype — the mille-feuille made with confit tomatoes and the tart agnolotti pasta stuffed with chicken liver are both must-orders.

An overhead photograph of hands tugging at bread and scooping vegetables from a bowl on a busy table.
Escargot croquettes, shrimp, and other dishes at Claud.
Teddy Wolff/Claud

Lord’s

In this follow-up to fish-and-chips hit, Dame from Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard, look for British nose-to-tail fare, that Eater says is “gutsy.” Dishes rotate but might include pig’s head, scotch eggs, and meat pies of the day — seafood takes a backseat.

A golden, oblong meat pie covered in a golden pastry shell with other plates of food surrounding it.
A spread from Lord’s from chef Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Ariari

Ariari is one of more than a dozen restaurants in the Hand Hospitality portfolio, replacing the team’s former East Village restaurant Oiji. At Ariari, raw seafood dishes take the stage, but there are also chicken skewers, lamb stuffed fried pepper, steamed monkfish, and spicy seafood udon noodles.

Fish served with lettuce wraps.
Fish served with lettuce wraps.
Ariari

Caleta

Husband-wife duo Jesse Merchant Zuñiga and Javier Zuñiga, who met working at Wildair and Contra, debuted a headquarters for their ice cream brand, Bad Habit, last month. By day, containers are sold at the East Village establishment, and by night, they’re selling small plates, including a creamy mussels toast, as well as wine. They’re also offering spiffed up ice-cream based desserts like baked Alaska.

Orange mussel toast.
Mussel toast.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Torrisi Bar and Restaurant

Torrisi Bar and Restaurant is a revival of sorts for Torrisi Italian Specialties — the Nolita restaurant which closed in 2015 — reborn in the historic Puck Building. Since its original incarnation, Major Food Group has been on a global expansion tear, bringing its theatrical red-sauce hits like Carbone to other cities. At Torrisi, the team attempts to keep things local by infusing some New York elements in dishes like chopped liver, but it mainly keeps to pasta.

Little Myanmar

Burmese food has always been a rare find in NYC, but Little Myanmar is one of a handful of restaurants that spotlight the cuisine across the city. The family behind the operation famously started out with Yun Cafe, a tiny stall inside a subway station in Jackson Heights (which remains open). But in the East Village, Little Myanmar stretches out with more space (and with more equipment) and that’s clear in the menu: The restaurant boasts an extensive range of punchy salads, grilled skewers, and both subtle and spicy curries. Don’t miss the goat curry, which Eater critic Robert Sietsema praised as one of the best versions of the dish in the city.

A metal wok of dark red meat curry on the bottom right, with a plate of rice and cup of soup on the upper left.
Goat curry at Little Myanmar.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Foul Witch

The Roberta’s team debuted its long-promised Italian restaurant and wine bar in the East Village last month. At the moment, no pizza is served, but you won’t miss it, when you try one of the several small plates of pasta, like veal tortellini or the goat garganelli. While Roberta’s fine dining restaurant Blanca remains closed, this is a more casual a la carte sibling.

Two plates, one with pasta the other with meat.
Goat garganelli.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Playita

This new Lower East Side spot focuses on Mexican mariscos from Iris Avelar, who is also a co-owner of La Superior taqueria in Williamsburg. There are fish tacos, Mexican-style shrimp cocktails, and ceviche, but the carne asada tacos are so good they almost overshadow the seafood theme. Don’t miss vegetarian dishes like tortilla soup, either.

A small cup of tortilla soup is topped with crumbly cheese at Playita, a new Mexican restaurant on the Lower East Side.
Tortilla soup.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Tin Building by Jean-Georges

Over eight years ago, chef and restaurateur Jean-Georges Vongerichten met with the president of the New York tri-state region for the Howard Hughes Corporation about opening a food destination in what had been the Fulton Street Fish Market in South Street Seaport. Today, they’ve opened a collection of six full-service restaurants, four bars, six counters, retail, and private dining in the entirely overhauled historic Tin Building. It includes an egg-focused morning spot, a bakery cafe, a sushi and sake bar, a brasserie, an oyster bar, a pizza spot, a vegan restaurant, a sit-down Chinese restaurant, a taqueria, and a dosa and crepes stand.

A photo of T Cafe in the ground level of the Tin Building from Jean-Georges Vongerichten.
T Cafe at the Tin Building.
Nicole Franzen

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