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A mix of plates and bowls with Chinese and Japanese food.
A variety of plates from Cha Kee.
An Rong Xu/Eater NY

The 15 Hottest New Restaurants in Manhattan, October 2021

Japanese-inflected Chinese restaurant Cha Kee and Southeast Asian comfort food spot Wau join the list this month

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A variety of plates from Cha Kee.
| An Rong Xu/Eater NY

A slew of new restaurants have opened in recent months, a remarkable change from earlier during the pandemic when many businesses pushed back their launches indefinitely. As New York City settles into this current reality, Eater is highlighting new restaurants in Manhattan — and a few old favorites — offering a mix of indoor and outdoor dining, delivery, and takeout, that have opened in the last few months.

New to the list in September: Tagmo (an online sweets shop turned regional homestyle Indian restaurant), Yoshino (a Japanese sushi master’s highly anticipated U.S. debut), Wau (Southeast Asian comfort food from the restaurateur behind Laut) and Cha Kee (a Japanese-influenced Chinese diner in Chinatown).

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; the latest data about the delta variant indicates that it may pose a low-to-moderate risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

For more New York dining recommendations, check out the new hotspots in Brooklyn, Queens, and the Hamptons.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Contento

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88 E 111th St
New York, NY 10029
(646) 410-0111
Visit Website

Wine industry veteran Yannick Benjamin partnered with George Gallego, Oscar Lorenzzi, Mara Rudzinski, and Lorenz Skeeter to open Contento, a welcoming wine bar with a Peruvian-rooted food menu and an eye toward inclusive hospitality and space accessibility. Contento boasts an ambitious range of wines — at varying price points — paired with a menu led by Lorenzzi that includes dishes like octopus with black chimichurri and duck liver mousse with purple corn focaccia. Benjamin and Gallego, who both use wheelchairs, helped design every inch of the dining room with consideration for wheelchair users, including wide aisles, higher tabletops, and lowered bar seating.

A curled leg of grilled octopus laid over a white sauce on a white plate.
Contento’s octopus dish.
Lily Brown/Contento
434 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10024
(917) 261-5926
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Wau — from veteran Laut restaurateur Salil Mehta — debuted on the Upper West Side with a bounty of Southeast Asian comfort food, including claypot golden braised tofu, pineapple fried rice, and murtabak, a Malaysian-Indian savory pancake stuffed with minced chicken and laced with jalapeños. The accompanying cocktail bar is stocked with Malaysian white coffee martinis and wau-lahs, “a Singaporean version of a piña colada,” as Mehta puts it.

Yellowish, breaded pieces of fried young coconut meat on a white plate with chiles.
Coconut calamari.
Protechnyc/Wau

3. Shukette

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230 9th Ave
New York, NY 10001
(212) 242-1803
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At Shukette, a playful spin-off of Mediterranean favorite Shuka in Soho, acclaimed chef Ayesha Nurdjaja has long-awaited access to an open kitchen, a charcoal grill, and a long list of breakout dishes to try. Early hits include the restaurant’s spicy summer cherry salad, and don’t miss the lineup of housemade dips and breads including a smoked salt cod spread and grilled lafa. Aim for a seat at the counter, where the kitchen team might slip in a few off-menu dishes.

Three people hold plates and dishes around a yellow table filled with spreads of vegetables, meats, breads, and dips.
A spread of dishes at Shukette.
Kyle Nunez/Shukette

4. Les Trois Chevaux

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283 W 12th St
New York, NY 10014
(917) 261-6085
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From the chef behind famed West Village establishment the Beatrice Inn comes Les Trois Chevaux, a white tablecloth restaurant located next door. Staples of pre-pandemic fine dining are on full display here, not limited to a chandelier acquired from the Waldorf Astoria hotel and a somewhat dated jacket requirement for male diners. The three-course $185 prix-fixe menu from chef Angie Mar rotates often, but has included confit frog legs, veal brain mousse, and a rack of lamb for two.

A person opens the door to a restaurant with plants and trees out front and an awning that reads “Les Trois Chevaux”
Les Trois Chevaux opened in early July.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

5. Dame

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87 MacDougal St
New York, NY 10012
(929) 367-7370
Visit Website

Last summer’s most-talked-about fish and chips pop-up has turned into one of this year’s hardest-to-get reservations. Dame, an English-rooted seafood restaurant from chef Ed Szymanski and co-owner Patricia Howard, opened its doors in June and customers have been pouring in ever since to try the team’s ever-evolving menu of playful seafood dishes. The fish and chips are still around, but they are now in good company among squid and shishito skewers, curried monkfish kebabs, and smoked whitefish croquettes.

Chunks of peeled green cucumber and yellow mussels with a brown puree, sprinkled with sprigs of green dill, on a white plate.
Cucumber salad with mussels at Dame.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

6. Electric Burrito

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81 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003
(646) 870-0104
Visit Website

From the team behind East Village cocktail bar Mister Paradise, Electric Burrito is a tiny counter-service spot that focuses on variations of just one thing: the French fry-filled burritos of San Diego, California. And if the lines out the door are any indication, they’re doing that one thing very well. Start with the original California burrito, made with french fries, carne asada, and pico de gallo, and slather on some of the complimentary creamy, zingy orange sauce.

Two halves of a chicken burrito rest on a counter, overflowing with chunks of meat, refried beans, french fries, and cheese.
Electric Burrito’s California burrito.
Electric Burrito

7. Yoshino

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342 Bowery
New York, NY 10012

Sure, Manhattan already has its fair share of luxury omakase restaurants, but Yoshino, from Japanese sushi master Tadashi Yoshida, is still a significant opening. The 10-seat space, where Yoshida sells a 20-course omakase for $400 apiece, marks the first time an established sushi master, not a protégé, has opened a location in NYC. Diners familiar with Yoshino’s now-closed counter in Nagoya will find many similarities in the Noho space — formerly, a Subway sandwich shop — with some Western departures sprinkled in, including scallops and some tuna sourced from Boston, Massachusetts.

A chef in a white uniform slices raw red tuna on a wooden cutting board.
Chef Yoshida sources tuna from Japan and just outside of Boston.
Melanie Landsman/Eater NY

8. Rebel Restaurant and Bar

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29 Clinton St
New York, NY 10002
(973) 861-6618
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A rare Manhattan Haitian restaurant, Rebel, joined the Lower East Side dining scene earlier this spring. Must-order dishes from the menu include lambi, or conch fricasseed in a garlic tomato sauce, and griot, with fatty chunks of pork that are boiled in a Seville orange marinade and then fried in a process that produces “flavorful and richly textured” meat, according to Eater critic Robert Sietsema.

Chunks of lamb, one being held aloft with a fork over a black plastic container.
Rebel’s griot.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

9. Sixty Three Clinton

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63 Clinton St
New York, NY 10002

Samuel Clonts and Raymond Trinh have years of experience between the two of them at fine-dining establishments such as Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare and Bar Uchū. At the duo’s first joint restaurant opening, they’ve kept the tasting-menu format but have done away with the break-the-bank-account price tags. In the 40-seat main dining room, Clonts’ modern American menu is available only as a seven-course experience ($92). The latest version of the tasting kicks off with a creative play on the breakfast taco with the addition of ingredients like ajitama (a seasoned egg with a custardy yolk) and trout roe. Other seasonally driven dishes include smoked corn paired with razor clams and caviar; roasted tomato agnolotti; and baked alaska with strawberry and yuzu. In the adjoining bar area, where Trinh oversees the beverage side of the restaurant, the menu can be ordered a la carte at the U-shaped marble bar or others seats overlooking the open kitchen, which is anchored by a wood-fired oven left over from when Speedy Romeo occupied the Lower East Side space. An optional add-on of a caviar handroll ($55) nods to Clonts and Trinh’s previous time at Uchū.

A tall plate with a single breakfast taco sits at a bar with two glasses of wine in the background.
The breakfast taco with ajitama, salsa verde, and trout roe at Sixty Three Clinton.
Giada Paoloni/Sixty Three Clinton

10. One White Street

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1 White St
New York, NY 10013

Dustin Wilson, a former wine director at Eleven Madison Park, and Austin Johnson, a former chef at the one-Michelin-star Frenchie in Paris, took over a Tribeca townhouse earlier this year. They converted the residence into One White Street, an upscale, three-story neighborhood restaurant that offers both a seven-course tasting menu and an a la carte lineup that includes grilled scallop skewers and garlicky roasted tomato focaccia. A good chunk of the produce for Johnson’s vegetable-laden menu come from the restaurant’s own farm in the Hudson Valley, which supplies One White Street with fresh crops of in-season veggies all year long.

A chic, upstairs dining room with a lengthy communal table and custom light fixtures on the ceiling.
An upstairs dining room at One White Street.
Nicole Franzen/One White Street

11. Dhamaka

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119 Delancey St
New York, NY 10002

Dhamaka, the newest restaurant from hitmaking duo Chintan Pandya and Roni Mazumdar, focuses on regional, everyday Indian food that is still rare to find in the U.S. Dishes include doh khleh, a pork salad with lemon, cilantro, onion, and ginger, from the northeastern Indian state of Meghalaya; macher jhol, a spicy fish curry from the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, here prepared with baby shark; and paplet fry, a whole fried pomfret fish typically eaten in the western Indian state of Maharashtra.

A whole fried fish placed on a blue plate next to a green sauce
Dhamaka’s paplet fry, a whole fried pomfret dish typically eaten in the western Indian state of Maharashtra.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

12. Cha Kee

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43 Mott St
New York, NY 10013

“Something new in Chinatown,” was co-owner Jimmy Fong’s vision behind Cha Kee, a Japanese-inflected Chinese diner that opened in the neighborhood in mid-September. In the kitchen, executive chef Akiko Thurnauer is overseeing a lively dinner menu that includes sake-steamed mussels and a sweet-and-sour pork marinated in koji and dehydrated pineapple; while a daytime spread of Hong Kong comfort foods is sold from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Ramen noodles in a blue and white ceramic bowl with a person lifting the noodles with chopsticks.
Cha Kee’s dan dan noodles.
An Rong Xu/Eater NY

13. Tagmo

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226 Front St
New York, NY 10038

Chef Surbhi Sahni is aiming to create an environment akin to her home kitchen at Tagmo, her jewel-toned restaurant in the Seaport District. Sahni started the business as an online sweets shop, gained a following for her high-end takes on mithai, small Indian confections, and then launched a savory meal delivery service during the pandemic. That work has culminated in a 28-seat restaurant of the same name, where she runs a dinner menu of regional Indian favorites and sells sweets, cookbooks, spices, and sauces in the front of the shop.

A light green round plate with three brown fritters stacked on top of each other with a spoonful of green chutney placed between each fritter.
Tagmo’s sabudana vada, fritters made with tapioca balls and paired with a mint and peanut chutney.
Molly Tavoletti/Eater NY

14. Saga

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70 Pine St
New York, NY 10005

Perched on the top of a Financial District skyscraper, Saga is a fine dining experience where customers can wine and dine while eye-level with passing helicopters. Chef James Kent and general manager Jeff Katz — industry veterans who built up a following with their neighborhood hit Crown Shy located on the ground floor of the same building — are now putting their own, slightly more relaxed spin on the rarified world of NYC fine dining with an intimate restaurant that spills out onto jaw-dropping outdoor terraces. But the views aren’t the only selling point at Saga and its upper-level cocktail bar Overstory. The restaurant offers a $245-per-person tasting menu that nods to “the things that are really important to me, and that I’ve learned over my life,” chef Kent tells Eater, with dishes taking cues from his Moroccan background and his childhood days spent fishing off of a Long Island houseboat.

A white dining terrace with tables, chairs, and green plants, with a background of NYC skyscrapers, buildings, and the waterfront.
One of Saga’s 12 outdoor terraces.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

15. Carne Mare

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89 South St
New York, NY 10038
(212) 280-4600
Visit Website

Chef Andrew Carmellini of Locanda Verde and the Dutch fame is one of several boldfaced names opening up restaurants at the South Street Seaport. His latest debut, Carne Mare, is a swanky, downtown destination that crosses lines between an American steakhouse and a traditional Italian restaurant and ends up with a decadent menu of 45-day dry-aged porterhouse steaks, octopus carpaccio, smoke-roasted beet steaks, and caviar-topped mozzarella sticks. Don’t miss the gorgonzola wagyu strip steak, which Eater critic Ryan Sutton recently declared NYC’s next great steak.

A low-lit, dark wood-filled dining room with brown circular booths and dark carpeting
Inside Carne Mare’s dining room.
Nicole Franzen/Carne Mare

1. Contento

88 E 111th St, New York, NY 10029
A curled leg of grilled octopus laid over a white sauce on a white plate.
Contento’s octopus dish.
Lily Brown/Contento

Wine industry veteran Yannick Benjamin partnered with George Gallego, Oscar Lorenzzi, Mara Rudzinski, and Lorenz Skeeter to open Contento, a welcoming wine bar with a Peruvian-rooted food menu and an eye toward inclusive hospitality and space accessibility. Contento boasts an ambitious range of wines — at varying price points — paired with a menu led by Lorenzzi that includes dishes like octopus with black chimichurri and duck liver mousse with purple corn focaccia. Benjamin and Gallego, who both use wheelchairs, helped design every inch of the dining room with consideration for wheelchair users, including wide aisles, higher tabletops, and lowered bar seating.

88 E 111th St
New York, NY 10029

2. Wau

434 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10024
Yellowish, breaded pieces of fried young coconut meat on a white plate with chiles.
Coconut calamari.
Protechnyc/Wau

Wau — from veteran Laut restaurateur Salil Mehta — debuted on the Upper West Side with a bounty of Southeast Asian comfort food, including claypot golden braised tofu, pineapple fried rice, and murtabak, a Malaysian-Indian savory pancake stuffed with minced chicken and laced with jalapeños. The accompanying cocktail bar is stocked with Malaysian white coffee martinis and wau-lahs, “a Singaporean version of a piña colada,” as Mehta puts it.

434 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10024

3. Shukette

230 9th Ave, New York, NY 10001
Three people hold plates and dishes around a yellow table filled with spreads of vegetables, meats, breads, and dips.
A spread of dishes at Shukette.
Kyle Nunez/Shukette

At Shukette, a playful spin-off of Mediterranean favorite Shuka in Soho, acclaimed chef Ayesha Nurdjaja has long-awaited access to an open kitchen, a charcoal grill, and a long list of breakout dishes to try. Early hits include the restaurant’s spicy summer cherry salad, and don’t miss the lineup of housemade dips and breads including a smoked salt cod spread and grilled lafa. Aim for a seat at the counter, where the kitchen team might slip in a few off-menu dishes.

230 9th Ave
New York, NY 10001

4. Les Trois Chevaux

283 W 12th St, New York, NY 10014
A person opens the door to a restaurant with plants and trees out front and an awning that reads “Les Trois Chevaux”
Les Trois Chevaux opened in early July.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

From the chef behind famed West Village establishment the Beatrice Inn comes Les Trois Chevaux, a white tablecloth restaurant located next door. Staples of pre-pandemic fine dining are on full display here, not limited to a chandelier acquired from the Waldorf Astoria hotel and a somewhat dated jacket requirement for male diners. The three-course $185 prix-fixe menu from chef Angie Mar rotates often, but has included confit frog legs, veal brain mousse, and a rack of lamb for two.

283 W 12th St
New York, NY 10014

5. Dame

87 MacDougal St, New York, NY 10012
Chunks of peeled green cucumber and yellow mussels with a brown puree, sprinkled with sprigs of green dill, on a white plate.
Cucumber salad with mussels at Dame.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Last summer’s most-talked-about fish and chips pop-up has turned into one of this year’s hardest-to-get reservations. Dame, an English-rooted seafood restaurant from chef Ed Szymanski and co-owner Patricia Howard, opened its doors in June and customers have been pouring in ever since to try the team’s ever-evolving menu of playful seafood dishes. The fish and chips are still around, but they are now in good company among squid and shishito skewers, curried monkfish kebabs, and smoked whitefish croquettes.

87 MacDougal St
New York, NY 10012

6. Electric Burrito

81 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003
Two halves of a chicken burrito rest on a counter, overflowing with chunks of meat, refried beans, french fries, and cheese.
Electric Burrito’s California burrito.
Electric Burrito

From the team behind East Village cocktail bar Mister Paradise, Electric Burrito is a tiny counter-service spot that focuses on variations of just one thing: the French fry-filled burritos of San Diego, California. And if the lines out the door are any indication, they’re doing that one thing very well. Start with the original California burrito, made with french fries, carne asada, and pico de gallo, and slather on some of the complimentary creamy, zingy orange sauce.

81 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003

7. Yoshino

342 Bowery, New York, NY 10012
A chef in a white uniform slices raw red tuna on a wooden cutting board.
Chef Yoshida sources tuna from Japan and just outside of Boston.
Melanie Landsman/Eater NY

Sure, Manhattan already has its fair share of luxury omakase restaurants, but Yoshino, from Japanese sushi master Tadashi Yoshida, is still a significant opening. The 10-seat space, where Yoshida sells a 20-course omakase for $400 apiece, marks the first time an established sushi master, not a protégé, has opened a location in NYC. Diners familiar with Yoshino’s now-closed counter in Nagoya will find many similarities in the Noho space — formerly, a Subway sandwich shop — with some Western departures sprinkled in, including scallops and some tuna sourced from Boston, Massachusetts.

342 Bowery
New York, NY 10012

8. Rebel Restaurant and Bar

29 Clinton St, New York, NY 10002
Chunks of lamb, one being held aloft with a fork over a black plastic container.
Rebel’s griot.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

A rare Manhattan Haitian restaurant, Rebel, joined the Lower East Side dining scene earlier this spring. Must-order dishes from the menu include lambi, or conch fricasseed in a garlic tomato sauce, and griot, with fatty chunks of pork that are boiled in a Seville orange marinade and then fried in a process that produces “flavorful and richly textured” meat, according to Eater critic Robert Sietsema.

29 Clinton St
New York, NY 10002

9. Sixty Three Clinton

63 Clinton St, New York, NY 10002
A tall plate with a single breakfast taco sits at a bar with two glasses of wine in the background.
The breakfast taco with ajitama, salsa verde, and trout roe at Sixty Three Clinton.
Giada Paoloni/Sixty Three Clinton

Samuel Clonts and Raymond Trinh have years of experience between the two of them at fine-dining establishments such as Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare and Bar Uchū. At the duo’s first joint restaurant opening, they’ve kept the tasting-menu format but have done away with the break-the-bank-account price tags. In the 40-seat main dining room, Clonts’ modern American menu is available only as a seven-course experience ($92). The latest version of the tasting kicks off with a creative play on the breakfast taco with the addition of ingredients like ajitama (a seasoned egg with a custardy yolk) and trout roe. Other seasonally driven dishes include smoked corn paired with razor clams and caviar; roasted tomato agnolotti; and baked alaska with strawberry and yuzu. In the adjoining bar area, where Trinh oversees the beverage side of the restaurant, the menu can be ordered a la carte at the U-shaped marble bar or others seats overlooking the open kitchen, which is anchored by a wood-fired oven left over from when Speedy Romeo occupied the Lower East Side space. An optional add-on of a caviar handroll ($55) nods to Clonts and Trinh’s previous time at Uchū.

63 Clinton St
New York, NY 10002

10. One White Street

1 White St, New York, NY 10013
A chic, upstairs dining room with a lengthy communal table and custom light fixtures on the ceiling.
An upstairs dining room at One White Street.
Nicole Franzen/One White Street

Dustin Wilson, a former wine director at Eleven Madison Park, and Austin Johnson, a former chef at the one-Michelin-star Frenchie in Paris, took over a Tribeca townhouse earlier this year. They converted the residence into One White Street, an upscale, three-story neighborhood restaurant that offers both a seven-course tasting menu and an a la carte lineup that includes grilled scallop skewers and garlicky roasted tomato focaccia. A good chunk of the produce for Johnson’s vegetable-laden menu come from the restaurant’s own farm in the Hudson Valley, which supplies One White Street with fresh crops of in-season veggies all year long.

1 White St
New York, NY 10013

11. Dhamaka

119 Delancey St, New York, NY 10002
A whole fried fish placed on a blue plate next to a green sauce
Dhamaka’s paplet fry, a whole fried pomfret dish typically eaten in the western Indian state of Maharashtra.
Adam Friedlander/Eater NY

Dhamaka, the newest restaurant from hitmaking duo Chintan Pandya and Roni Mazumdar, focuses on regional, everyday Indian food that is still rare to find in the U.S. Dishes include doh khleh, a pork salad with lemon, cilantro, onion, and ginger, from the northeastern Indian state of Meghalaya; macher jhol, a spicy fish curry from the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, here prepared with baby shark; and paplet fry, a whole fried pomfret fish typically eaten in the western Indian state of Maharashtra.

119 Delancey St
New York, NY 10002

12. Cha Kee

43 Mott St, New York, NY 10013
Ramen noodles in a blue and white ceramic bowl with a person lifting the noodles with chopsticks.
Cha Kee’s dan dan noodles.
An Rong Xu/Eater NY

“Something new in Chinatown,” was co-owner Jimmy Fong’s vision behind Cha Kee, a Japanese-inflected Chinese diner that opened in the neighborhood in mid-September. In the kitchen, executive chef Akiko Thurnauer is overseeing a lively dinner menu that includes sake-steamed mussels and a sweet-and-sour pork marinated in koji and dehydrated pineapple; while a daytime spread of Hong Kong comfort foods is sold from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

43 Mott St
New York, NY 10013

13. Tagmo

226 Front St, New York, NY 10038
A light green round plate with three brown fritters stacked on top of each other with a spoonful of green chutney placed between each fritter.
Tagmo’s sabudana vada, fritters made with tapioca balls and paired with a mint and peanut chutney.
Molly Tavoletti/Eater NY

Chef Surbhi Sahni is aiming to create an environment akin to her home kitchen at Tagmo, her jewel-toned restaurant in the Seaport District. Sahni started the business as an online sweets shop, gained a following for her high-end takes on mithai, small Indian confections, and then launched a savory meal delivery service during the pandemic. That work has culminated in a 28-seat restaurant of the same name, where she runs a dinner menu of regional Indian favorites and sells sweets, cookbooks, spices, and sauces in the front of the shop.

226 Front St
New York, NY 10038

14. Saga

70 Pine St, New York, NY 10005
A white dining terrace with tables, chairs, and green plants, with a background of NYC skyscrapers, buildings, and the waterfront.
One of Saga’s 12 outdoor terraces.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Perched on the top of a Financial District skyscraper, Saga is a fine dining experience where customers can wine and dine while eye-level with passing helicopters. Chef James Kent and general manager Jeff Katz — industry veterans who built up a following with their neighborhood hit Crown Shy located on the ground floor of the same building — are now putting their own, slightly more relaxed spin on the rarified world of NYC fine dining with an intimate restaurant that spills out onto jaw-dropping outdoor terraces. But the views aren’t the only selling point at Saga and its upper-level cocktail bar Overstory. The restaurant offers a $245-per-person tasting menu that nods to “the things that are really important to me, and that I’ve learned over my life,” chef Kent tells Eater, with dishes taking cues from his Moroccan background and his childhood days spent fishing off of a Long Island houseboat.

70 Pine St
New York, NY 10005

15. Carne Mare

89 South St, New York, NY 10038
A low-lit, dark wood-filled dining room with brown circular booths and dark carpeting
Inside Carne Mare’s dining room.
Nicole Franzen/Carne Mare

Chef Andrew Carmellini of Locanda Verde and the Dutch fame is one of several boldfaced names opening up restaurants at the South Street Seaport. His latest debut, Carne Mare, is a swanky, downtown destination that crosses lines between an American steakhouse and a traditional Italian restaurant and ends up with a decadent menu of 45-day dry-aged porterhouse steaks, octopus carpaccio, smoke-roasted beet steaks, and caviar-topped mozzarella sticks. Don’t miss the gorgonzola wagyu strip steak, which Eater critic Ryan Sutton recently declared NYC’s next great steak.

89 South St
New York, NY 10038

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