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New York City Celebrates Pride Month
The historic Stonewall Inn.
Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

17 Stellar LGBTQ Bars to Celebrate Pride in NYC

The happy hours, dance parties, drag shows, and queer bars to seek out during Pride — and the rest of the year

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The historic Stonewall Inn.
| Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Pride Month, aka June, is a time for celebrating and empowering the many sexual and gender identities embraced by the LGBTQ community. It’s a part of the year when New York City’s queer bars and clubs ramp up their parties and promotions — happy hours, drag shows, drink specials, and all sorts of events to toast the city’s vibrant LGBTQ scene. From dive bars to newly opened clubs, these safe spaces for NYC’s queer community are worth seeking out year round.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Hush, which opened during the pandemic in the former home of Therapy, is one of NYC’s newest gay bars. The bi-level space is home to a happening dance club, especially on weekends, and ticks off all the boxes of a night out: dancers, shots, and DJs blasting a playlist until late.

Hardware

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Venture to this cavernous 10th Avenue bar in a former electrical-supply store for a hip scene where no one takes themselves too seriously. The design is industrial-inspired and serves as a backdrop for regular drag and DJ shows, which in the past has featured stars including Shequida Hall and Lina Bradford. Happy hour runs from 2 to 8 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays. Deals include $6 well drinks, beer, and wine. Saturdays and Sundays feature a drag show with $6 margaritas, mimosas, and bloody marys, and $8 Long Island iced teas.

Friend's Tavern

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A number of gay bars in Jackson Heights have a big following in Queens, but Friend’s Tavern is one of the most popular. It’s often a gathering point for a groups of friends looking for a night out. Another bonus to its prime location (besides easy access to the 7 train) is that it’s just steps from the crowd favorite Birria-Landia truck and a slew of well-reviewed restaurants.

This mini-chain of sports-centric LGBTQ bars draws a diverse group of folks through its doors — sports fans or not. They may be catching a game, watching the latest RuPaul’s Drag Race with a drag queen MC, or simply chatting after work over happy hour as bartenders often wearing, yes, red boxers serve up drinks. According to recent social media posts, a Hell’s Kitchen location will reopen.

Cubbyhole

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Lesbian bars are all too rare in New York and the rest of the country, cementing their importance in the queer bar scene. Dating back to 1994, Cubbyhole is one of the most famous of such venues and promotes itself as accessible to the entire LGBTQ+ community and allies. It’s a very tight space, and the ceiling is adorned in random, bright decor that gives it a funhouse feel. Happy hour runs Monday through Friday from 4 to 7 p.m. and Saturday 2 to 6 p.m. with half off well drinks, wine, and beer.

Inside a bar with Disney and stuff animal decorations hanging from the ceiling.
Inside the bar at Cubbyhole.
Cubbyhole

The longest-running gay bar in the city, this West Village institution proudly displays its history. A woody corner tavern, it looks like it’s hardly changed over the years, and longtgime regulars will mingle with newbes while perched on the stools. Grab a cozy table in the back for a group and order the juicy, freshly griddled burger. Cash only.

A facade of a gay bar called Julius with stucco walls and a large window with lettering in green.
Julius is one of the oldest gay bars in NYC.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Stonewall Inn

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Ground zero for the 1969 riots that helped launch the gay rights movement, Stonewall is still a rousing, if now slightly sleeker and occasionally touristy, Village destination to pay tribute to the movement. Downstairs, there’s a pool table and large bar area with bar seating and tables. Upstairs, there’s another bar plus a dance floor and stage that hosts various events, including drag shows, 90s karaoke, and more.

Hangar Bar

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Queer people of color can rightfully feel excluded by many of the gay hotspots dotting the city. Hangar is an under-the-radar neighborhood bar filled with a diverse crowd that’s equally inviting to everyone. Grab a beer and play pool surrounded by the whitewashed walls covered with a giant rainbow flag. Cash only.

Nowhere

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This subterranean East Village queer dive features a draft beer selection that’s a step above the standard dive, doled out by personable, knowledgeable bartenders. There are seemingly endless dark nooks for hanging out — or impromptu makeout sessions. The infamously risque Macho Monday Night parties ($10 cover) aren’t for the faint of heart. There are happy hours, and after 10 p.m., the dance parties begin. Check the website for specific events.

Henrietta Hudson

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On a stretch of the West Village near the Hudson River, this bar primarily caters to lesbians and queer women and is one of the longest continuously running lesbian bars in the country. The funky brick-walled space decorated with stained glass and a disco ball hosts rotating DJs spinning tunes. There’s a pool table, and some nights are no-cover. The bar is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

A crowded bar with patrons dancing, including a dancer on a bar with a purple lit backdrop.
Henrietta Hudson is one of the few lesbian bars in NYC.
Henrietta Hudson

The Boiler Room

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A long-running and homey dive, Boiler Room is where laid-back East Village residents go to simply hang out and guzzle gently priced well drinks. The ambiance is nonexistent, but the pool table, photo booth, and digital jukebox provide all-night entertainment.

The Exley

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Though not formally gay, this tiny, adorable Williamsburg bar in a renovated garage near the BQE is a frequent way station for hip queer locals. Go for the packed RuPaul’s Drag Race viewing nights, when a projector screen covers the large oil painting behind the bar, or visit on a low-key night for the smartly curated cocktails, including a $10 old fashioned.

A bar backdrop with bottles of alcohol in front of a colorful yellow, orange, and blue wall.
The Exley is popular for viewing episodes of RuPaul’s Drag Race.
The Exley

Macri Park

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This sister bar to nearby Metropolitan in Williamsburg is less crowded and way more laid back. Sit back in the booths of the tunnel-like space or head to the quaint backyard. There are drag shows, weekly karaoke, and more events, usually posted on Instagram.

The Rosemont

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This popular and cheerful gay bar occupies a roomy, thoughtfully designed space with a backyard in South Williamsburg. Drag nights and karaoke are major draws, while themed parties bring crowds to the dance floor on weekends.

House of Yes

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A nightclub for those who can’t stand nightclubs, Bushwick’s House of Yes packs costumed and adventurous patrons into its massive, elegant indoor-outdoor compound with multiple bars. Covers can get steep for events including queer dancing and drag performances, but they’re almost always worth it. Gaze at the talented acrobatic dancers contorting themselves from the ceiling any time of the week.

Two people in silver and pink costumes at nightclub House of Yes.
House of Yes often lures patrons who dress up.
Brendan Burke/House Of Yes

Ginger's Bar

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While Ginger’s in Park Slope is a lesbian hangout at its core, the bar welcomes all members of the LGBTQ+ community and attracts bargoers of all ages and genders. It’s a legit dive with low-lighting, cheap drinks, kitschy decor, and a pool table. There’s an enclosed garden out back, and the bar never feels clubby, so it’s an ideal spot for a chill night of pool and music. With plenty of space, it’s great for groups.

Good Judy

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Good Judy in Park Slope feels like a good balance between a dive bar meets a disco with a loyal local following. Patrons can easily swing by for a pint, a Eurovision viewing, or dance party on any given night.

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Hush

Hush, which opened during the pandemic in the former home of Therapy, is one of NYC’s newest gay bars. The bi-level space is home to a happening dance club, especially on weekends, and ticks off all the boxes of a night out: dancers, shots, and DJs blasting a playlist until late.

Hardware

Venture to this cavernous 10th Avenue bar in a former electrical-supply store for a hip scene where no one takes themselves too seriously. The design is industrial-inspired and serves as a backdrop for regular drag and DJ shows, which in the past has featured stars including Shequida Hall and Lina Bradford. Happy hour runs from 2 to 8 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays. Deals include $6 well drinks, beer, and wine. Saturdays and Sundays feature a drag show with $6 margaritas, mimosas, and bloody marys, and $8 Long Island iced teas.

Friend's Tavern

A number of gay bars in Jackson Heights have a big following in Queens, but Friend’s Tavern is one of the most popular. It’s often a gathering point for a groups of friends looking for a night out. Another bonus to its prime location (besides easy access to the 7 train) is that it’s just steps from the crowd favorite Birria-Landia truck and a slew of well-reviewed restaurants.

Boxers

This mini-chain of sports-centric LGBTQ bars draws a diverse group of folks through its doors — sports fans or not. They may be catching a game, watching the latest RuPaul’s Drag Race with a drag queen MC, or simply chatting after work over happy hour as bartenders often wearing, yes, red boxers serve up drinks. According to recent social media posts, a Hell’s Kitchen location will reopen.

Cubbyhole

Lesbian bars are all too rare in New York and the rest of the country, cementing their importance in the queer bar scene. Dating back to 1994, Cubbyhole is one of the most famous of such venues and promotes itself as accessible to the entire LGBTQ+ community and allies. It’s a very tight space, and the ceiling is adorned in random, bright decor that gives it a funhouse feel. Happy hour runs Monday through Friday from 4 to 7 p.m. and Saturday 2 to 6 p.m. with half off well drinks, wine, and beer.

Inside a bar with Disney and stuff animal decorations hanging from the ceiling.
Inside the bar at Cubbyhole.
Cubbyhole

Julius

The longest-running gay bar in the city, this West Village institution proudly displays its history. A woody corner tavern, it looks like it’s hardly changed over the years, and longtgime regulars will mingle with newbes while perched on the stools. Grab a cozy table in the back for a group and order the juicy, freshly griddled burger. Cash only.

A facade of a gay bar called Julius with stucco walls and a large window with lettering in green.
Julius is one of the oldest gay bars in NYC.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Stonewall Inn

Ground zero for the 1969 riots that helped launch the gay rights movement, Stonewall is still a rousing, if now slightly sleeker and occasionally touristy, Village destination to pay tribute to the movement. Downstairs, there’s a pool table and large bar area with bar seating and tables. Upstairs, there’s another bar plus a dance floor and stage that hosts various events, including drag shows, 90s karaoke, and more.

Hangar Bar

Queer people of color can rightfully feel excluded by many of the gay hotspots dotting the city. Hangar is an under-the-radar neighborhood bar filled with a diverse crowd that’s equally inviting to everyone. Grab a beer and play pool surrounded by the whitewashed walls covered with a giant rainbow flag. Cash only.

Nowhere

This subterranean East Village queer dive features a draft beer selection that’s a step above the standard dive, doled out by personable, knowledgeable bartenders. There are seemingly endless dark nooks for hanging out — or impromptu makeout sessions. The infamously risque Macho Monday Night parties ($10 cover) aren’t for the faint of heart. There are happy hours, and after 10 p.m., the dance parties begin. Check the website for specific events.

Henrietta Hudson

On a stretch of the West Village near the Hudson River, this bar primarily caters to lesbians and queer women and is one of the longest continuously running lesbian bars in the country. The funky brick-walled space decorated with stained glass and a disco ball hosts rotating DJs spinning tunes. There’s a pool table, and some nights are no-cover. The bar is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

A crowded bar with patrons dancing, including a dancer on a bar with a purple lit backdrop.
Henrietta Hudson is one of the few lesbian bars in NYC.
Henrietta Hudson

The Boiler Room

A long-running and homey dive, Boiler Room is where laid-back East Village residents go to simply hang out and guzzle gently priced well drinks. The ambiance is nonexistent, but the pool table, photo booth, and digital jukebox provide all-night entertainment.

The Exley

Though not formally gay, this tiny, adorable Williamsburg bar in a renovated garage near the BQE is a frequent way station for hip queer locals. Go for the packed RuPaul’s Drag Race viewing nights, when a projector screen covers the large oil painting behind the bar, or visit on a low-key night for the smartly curated cocktails, including a $10 old fashioned.

A bar backdrop with bottles of alcohol in front of a colorful yellow, orange, and blue wall.
The Exley is popular for viewing episodes of RuPaul’s Drag Race.
The Exley

Macri Park

This sister bar to nearby Metropolitan in Williamsburg is less crowded and way more laid back. Sit back in the booths of the tunnel-like space or head to the quaint backyard. There are drag shows, weekly karaoke, and more events, usually posted on Instagram.

The Rosemont

This popular and cheerful gay bar occupies a roomy, thoughtfully designed space with a backyard in South Williamsburg. Drag nights and karaoke are major draws, while themed parties bring crowds to the dance floor on weekends.

House of Yes

A nightclub for those who can’t stand nightclubs, Bushwick’s House of Yes packs costumed and adventurous patrons into its massive, elegant indoor-outdoor compound with multiple bars. Covers can get steep for events including queer dancing and drag performances, but they’re almost always worth it. Gaze at the talented acrobatic dancers contorting themselves from the ceiling any time of the week.

Two people in silver and pink costumes at nightclub House of Yes.
House of Yes often lures patrons who dress up.
Brendan Burke/House Of Yes

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Ginger's Bar

While Ginger’s in Park Slope is a lesbian hangout at its core, the bar welcomes all members of the LGBTQ+ community and attracts bargoers of all ages and genders. It’s a legit dive with low-lighting, cheap drinks, kitschy decor, and a pool table. There’s an enclosed garden out back, and the bar never feels clubby, so it’s an ideal spot for a chill night of pool and music. With plenty of space, it’s great for groups.

Good Judy

Good Judy in Park Slope feels like a good balance between a dive bar meets a disco with a loyal local following. Patrons can easily swing by for a pint, a Eurovision viewing, or dance party on any given night.

Related Maps