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The Greenwich Village location of Mamoun’s stays open until 4 a.m. on weekends.
Gary He/Eater NY

17 Late-Night Restaurants for Dining At Any Hour

Where to find al pastor tacos, Korean barbecue, and greasy pizza by the slice in the city that never sleeps

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The Greenwich Village location of Mamoun’s stays open until 4 a.m. on weekends.
| Gary He/Eater NY

The words “late night” don’t carry quite as much heft as they used to, even two years after the onset of the pandemic. A number of establishments that previously operated around the clock have since scaled back their hours due to a downturn in late-night foot traffic. Until they return, Eater has rounded up this list of late-night restaurants serving grub into the post-work, post-party hours. This guide of mostly 24-hour restaurants, and a few notable spots that stay open until at least 3 a.m., includes Punjabi delis, Mexican bakeries, old-school doughnut shops, and a raucous Korean barbecue spot spread out over three floors.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Cooler Runnings Jamaican Restaurant

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Long after the rest of this neighborhood’s Caribbean restaurants and bakeries have closed, Cooler Runnings is still dishing out crab legs, jerk chicken, saltfish, and stewed red snapper in family-style portions. The Jamaican-Caribbean restaurant stays open for dine-in and delivery 24 hours.

Floridita

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Open since 1995, this Cuban-Dominican restaurant in Washington Heights continues to draw crowds around the clock with its bistec, rotisserie chicken, and many mofongos. Floridita is best known for its Cuban sandwich, served 24 hours and consisting of a fat stack of ham, pork roast, pickles, and Swiss cheese on crispy bread for around $6.

Taco Mix

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Taco Mix serves some of the city’s most legendary al pastor tacos, stuffed with crispy crimson pork shaved off the trompo and topped with roasted pineapple and salsa. This barebones space with several off-shoots across the city stays open until 4 a.m. nightly.

Two al pastor tacos dressed with the usual onion, cilantro, and pineapple on a plate.
A pair of tacos al pastor from Taco Mix.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Empanada Mama

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If New York City has one restaurant that never sleeps, it’s Empanada Mama. After scaling back its hours during the pandemic, the Hell’s Kitchen favorite is once again serving its nourishing Colombian fare 24 hours a day. Highlights include a classic South American breakfast of beans and rice with eggs, shockingly spicy arepas, chicken soup studded with cilantro and rice, frozen margaritas, and stellar corn empanadas (try the ones filled with shellfish or beef).

Six empanadas cut in half and displayed on a white plate with green designs on the edge. A person is holding one empanada up to the camera
Shredded chicken overflows from an empanada at Empanada Mama.
Erika Adams/Eater NY

Sammy's Halal Food

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Sure, there are halal carts stationed across the city, but few do it better than Sammy’s. This food cart with a second location in Greenwich Village serves high quality, reasonably priced halal food 24 hours. Chicken and gyro sandwiches, wrapped up in pita, are priced at $6, and larger platters with rice, salad, and additional meat are available for two dollars more.

An aluminum container with falafel, lettuce, onion, and heaps of red and white sauce.
The falafel over rice at Sammy’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Miss Korea BBQ

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This three-floor Korean barbecue favorite is once again open 24 hours after closing at a more modest 9 p.m. for a stretch of the pandemic. A trio of barbecue sets are on offer — called Longevity, Happiness, and Love — and each comes with four types of meat, a traditional Korean stew, and the option to add on a la carte meats, seafood, and vegetables for an around-the-clock feast.

A tented outdoor setup is situated in front of a Korean barbecue restaurant, Miss Korea BBQ.
Miss Korea BBQ earlier in the pandemic.
Amina Ford/Eater NY

Court Square Diner

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Not much has changed at this 24-hour diner since brothers Steve and Nick Kanellos started running the joint in 1991, even as Long Island City has welcomed glitzy food halls and developments to the neighborhood. Court Square Diner serves a standard (read: all-encompassing, multi-page) diner menu with Jello, 15 different omelettes, and hulking hero sandwiches.

Coppelia

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This 24-hour Latin diner has been holding down Chelsea’s late-night food scene for more than a decade. Coppelia skews Mexican and Cuban, but the 24-hour restaurant pulls from all over the Caribbean and Central and South America for its menu of oxtail empanadas, Cuban sandwiches, and lomo saltado (a Peruvian stir-fry served with french fries). Breakfast is served all day.

Runny eggs exceedingly yellow and bright white broken up on tortillas.
Huevos rancheros from Coppelia.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Donut Pub

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A neon “Fresh!” sign and a colorful wall of doughnuts announce this 24-hour bakery, operating in the West Village since 1964. The Donut Pub will occasionally throw things like crushed Oreo’s onto its doughnuts, and now serves its own version of the Cronut, but as always, the basics are best. The crullers and the honey dips are great, and coconut lovers will appreciate both toasted and untoasted coconut doughnuts here.

Mamoun's Falafel

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Some five decades after opening in Greenwich Village, Mamoun’s Falafel continues to serve one of the city’s most iconic late-night meals. Lamb shawarma, baklava, and the restaurant’s namesake falafel sandwiches (around $6 each), are available until 3 a.m. on Thursdays and 4 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

A styrofoam takeout container overflows with dolmas, falafel, and other dishes beside a stack of fluffy pita.
An overflowing styrofoam container of falafel and baba ganoush from Mamoun’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Pak Punjab Deli & Grocery Smoke Shop

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This East Village storefront could pass as a corner deli and smoke shop, were it not for the throngs of delivery workers and late-night customers spilling in and out of its door. Head inside, where a small selection of groceries and a menu of hot foods awaits. The deli pairs standard bodega fare — egg-and-cheese sandwiches on a roll, no bacon — with filling Indian fare, like chicken biryani, samosas, and saucy takeout trays of tikka masala. A row of steam trays offer fried fish and more.

A hand with painted nails clutches a plastic takeout container of red chicken.
A saucy takeout container of chicken from Pak Punjab.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Rosa’s Pizza

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If nothing but pizza will do, consider Rosa’s, a Williamsburg outpost of a decades-old Maspeth, Queens, pizzeria of the same name. This late-night slice shop keeps its ovens going until 2 a.m. on weekdays and 4 a.m. on weekends, doling out pies topped with ravioli, rigatoni vodka, and other unconventional toppings. A plain slice goes for $3.

Kellogg's Diner

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True, New Yorkers can now order Kellogg’s from one of 18 or more virtual restaurants operating out of the diner, but there’s nothing like a meal here in the middle of the night, when construction workers, taxi drivers, and drunken hipsters bump elbows at leather booths. The food is just fine, priced for Williamsburg, and possibly in need of some hot sauce, but be warned that even at 5 a.m., a table for four here can command a wait.

A biker passed in front of Kellogg’s Diner, a decades-old restaurant on the corner of Metropolitan and Union avenues in Williamsburg.
Outside of Kellogg’s Diner in Williamsburg.
Rob Kim/Getty Images

La Isla

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Dubbed one of the “coolest spots to be seen” in Bushwick by Eater critic Robert Sietsema, Puerto Rican mainstay La Isla specializes in blood sausage, pig ear, pernil, and a handful of other pork-based snacks served 24 hours daily. The late-night lunch counter also boasts an impressive selection of juices, including tamarind and grape flavors.

Hadramout Restaurant

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Expect big portions of Yemeni cuisine at one of the only 24-hour options on Atlantic Avenue’s heavily Middle Eastern stretch between Clinton and Court streets. Open since 1996, the sparse subterranean space with a few tables turns out solid lamb dishes (in stews, sandwiches, and more) and piquant spreads, with huge rounds of bread to scoop and dip in everything.

Girasol Bakery

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This South Slope bakery with a cafeteria-like dining room churns out huaraches, cemitas, and other Mexican fare around the clock. There’s a vending machine stocked with Takis, Hot Cheetos, and Flamin’ Hot chips at the back of the space, and many of its pan dulce are made on premises (even in the after hours, there’s usually a handful to choose from). Pair one with a breakfast burrito, packed with cheesy potato and perfectly acceptable to eat any time of day.

A hand clutches a breakfast burrito filled with chunks of potato, sausage, and American cheese from Girasol Bakery in South Slope, Brooklyn.
A potato-packed breakfast burrito from Girasol Bakery.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Sunset Park Diner & Donuts

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A short distance from Green-Wood Cemetery lies 24-hour fixture Sunset Park Diner & Doughnuts. Slide into a booth by the window and order from a wide-reaching menu with fish and chips, fettuccine alfredo, chicken tacos, disco fries, and — true to its name — doughnuts. They cost less than $2 each, or a dollar more for cruller and “fancy doughnuts.” Cash only.

Cooler Runnings Jamaican Restaurant

Long after the rest of this neighborhood’s Caribbean restaurants and bakeries have closed, Cooler Runnings is still dishing out crab legs, jerk chicken, saltfish, and stewed red snapper in family-style portions. The Jamaican-Caribbean restaurant stays open for dine-in and delivery 24 hours.

Floridita

Open since 1995, this Cuban-Dominican restaurant in Washington Heights continues to draw crowds around the clock with its bistec, rotisserie chicken, and many mofongos. Floridita is best known for its Cuban sandwich, served 24 hours and consisting of a fat stack of ham, pork roast, pickles, and Swiss cheese on crispy bread for around $6.

Taco Mix

Two al pastor tacos dressed with the usual onion, cilantro, and pineapple on a plate.
A pair of tacos al pastor from Taco Mix.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Taco Mix serves some of the city’s most legendary al pastor tacos, stuffed with crispy crimson pork shaved off the trompo and topped with roasted pineapple and salsa. This barebones space with several off-shoots across the city stays open until 4 a.m. nightly.

Two al pastor tacos dressed with the usual onion, cilantro, and pineapple on a plate.
A pair of tacos al pastor from Taco Mix.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Empanada Mama

Six empanadas cut in half and displayed on a white plate with green designs on the edge. A person is holding one empanada up to the camera
Shredded chicken overflows from an empanada at Empanada Mama.
Erika Adams/Eater NY

If New York City has one restaurant that never sleeps, it’s Empanada Mama. After scaling back its hours during the pandemic, the Hell’s Kitchen favorite is once again serving its nourishing Colombian fare 24 hours a day. Highlights include a classic South American breakfast of beans and rice with eggs, shockingly spicy arepas, chicken soup studded with cilantro and rice, frozen margaritas, and stellar corn empanadas (try the ones filled with shellfish or beef).

Six empanadas cut in half and displayed on a white plate with green designs on the edge. A person is holding one empanada up to the camera
Shredded chicken overflows from an empanada at Empanada Mama.
Erika Adams/Eater NY

Sammy's Halal Food

An aluminum container with falafel, lettuce, onion, and heaps of red and white sauce.
The falafel over rice at Sammy’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Sure, there are halal carts stationed across the city, but few do it better than Sammy’s. This food cart with a second location in Greenwich Village serves high quality, reasonably priced halal food 24 hours. Chicken and gyro sandwiches, wrapped up in pita, are priced at $6, and larger platters with rice, salad, and additional meat are available for two dollars more.

An aluminum container with falafel, lettuce, onion, and heaps of red and white sauce.
The falafel over rice at Sammy’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Miss Korea BBQ

A tented outdoor setup is situated in front of a Korean barbecue restaurant, Miss Korea BBQ.
Miss Korea BBQ earlier in the pandemic.
Amina Ford/Eater NY

This three-floor Korean barbecue favorite is once again open 24 hours after closing at a more modest 9 p.m. for a stretch of the pandemic. A trio of barbecue sets are on offer — called Longevity, Happiness, and Love — and each comes with four types of meat, a traditional Korean stew, and the option to add on a la carte meats, seafood, and vegetables for an around-the-clock feast.

A tented outdoor setup is situated in front of a Korean barbecue restaurant, Miss Korea BBQ.
Miss Korea BBQ earlier in the pandemic.
Amina Ford/Eater NY

Court Square Diner

Not much has changed at this 24-hour diner since brothers Steve and Nick Kanellos started running the joint in 1991, even as Long Island City has welcomed glitzy food halls and developments to the neighborhood. Court Square Diner serves a standard (read: all-encompassing, multi-page) diner menu with Jello, 15 different omelettes, and hulking hero sandwiches.

Coppelia

Runny eggs exceedingly yellow and bright white broken up on tortillas.
Huevos rancheros from Coppelia.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

This 24-hour Latin diner has been holding down Chelsea’s late-night food scene for more than a decade. Coppelia skews Mexican and Cuban, but the 24-hour restaurant pulls from all over the Caribbean and Central and South America for its menu of oxtail empanadas, Cuban sandwiches, and lomo saltado (a Peruvian stir-fry served with french fries). Breakfast is served all day.

Runny eggs exceedingly yellow and bright white broken up on tortillas.
Huevos rancheros from Coppelia.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Donut Pub

A neon “Fresh!” sign and a colorful wall of doughnuts announce this 24-hour bakery, operating in the West Village since 1964. The Donut Pub will occasionally throw things like crushed Oreo’s onto its doughnuts, and now serves its own version of the Cronut, but as always, the basics are best. The crullers and the honey dips are great, and coconut lovers will appreciate both toasted and untoasted coconut doughnuts here.

Mamoun's Falafel

A styrofoam takeout container overflows with dolmas, falafel, and other dishes beside a stack of fluffy pita.
An overflowing styrofoam container of falafel and baba ganoush from Mamoun’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Some five decades after opening in Greenwich Village, Mamoun’s Falafel continues to serve one of the city’s most iconic late-night meals. Lamb shawarma, baklava, and the restaurant’s namesake falafel sandwiches (around $6 each), are available until 3 a.m. on Thursdays and 4 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

A styrofoam takeout container overflows with dolmas, falafel, and other dishes beside a stack of fluffy pita.
An overflowing styrofoam container of falafel and baba ganoush from Mamoun’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Pak Punjab Deli & Grocery Smoke Shop

A hand with painted nails clutches a plastic takeout container of red chicken.
A saucy takeout container of chicken from Pak Punjab.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

This East Village storefront could pass as a corner deli and smoke shop, were it not for the throngs of delivery workers and late-night customers spilling in and out of its door. Head inside, where a small selection of groceries and a menu of hot foods awaits. The deli pairs standard bodega fare — egg-and-cheese sandwiches on a roll, no bacon — with filling Indian fare, like chicken biryani, samosas, and saucy takeout trays of tikka masala. A row of steam trays offer fried fish and more.

A hand with painted nails clutches a plastic takeout container of red chicken.
A saucy takeout container of chicken from Pak Punjab.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Rosa’s Pizza

If nothing but pizza will do, consider Rosa’s, a Williamsburg outpost of a decades-old Maspeth, Queens, pizzeria of the same name. This late-night slice shop keeps its ovens going until 2 a.m. on weekdays and 4 a.m. on weekends, doling out pies topped with ravioli, rigatoni vodka, and other unconventional toppings. A plain slice goes for $3.

Kellogg's Diner

A biker passed in front of Kellogg’s Diner, a decades-old restaurant on the corner of Metropolitan and Union avenues in Williamsburg.
Outside of Kellogg’s Diner in Williamsburg.
Rob Kim/Getty Images

True, New Yorkers can now order Kellogg’s from one of 18 or more virtual restaurants operating out of the diner, but there’s nothing like a meal here in the middle of the night, when construction workers, taxi drivers, and drunken hipsters bump elbows at leather booths. The food is just fine, priced for Williamsburg, and possibly in need of some hot sauce, but be warned that even at 5 a.m., a table for four here can command a wait.

A biker passed in front of Kellogg’s Diner, a decades-old restaurant on the corner of Metropolitan and Union avenues in Williamsburg.
Outside of Kellogg’s Diner in Williamsburg.
Rob Kim/Getty Images

La Isla

Dubbed one of the “coolest spots to be seen” in Bushwick by Eater critic Robert Sietsema, Puerto Rican mainstay La Isla specializes in blood sausage, pig ear, pernil, and a handful of other pork-based snacks served 24 hours daily. The late-night lunch counter also boasts an impressive selection of juices, including tamarind and grape flavors.

Hadramout Restaurant

Expect big portions of Yemeni cuisine at one of the only 24-hour options on Atlantic Avenue’s heavily Middle Eastern stretch between Clinton and Court streets. Open since 1996, the sparse subterranean space with a few tables turns out solid lamb dishes (in stews, sandwiches, and more) and piquant spreads, with huge rounds of bread to scoop and dip in everything.

Related Maps

Girasol Bakery

A hand clutches a breakfast burrito filled with chunks of potato, sausage, and American cheese from Girasol Bakery in South Slope, Brooklyn.
A potato-packed breakfast burrito from Girasol Bakery.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

This South Slope bakery with a cafeteria-like dining room churns out huaraches, cemitas, and other Mexican fare around the clock. There’s a vending machine stocked with Takis, Hot Cheetos, and Flamin’ Hot chips at the back of the space, and many of its pan dulce are made on premises (even in the after hours, there’s usually a handful to choose from). Pair one with a breakfast burrito, packed with cheesy potato and perfectly acceptable to eat any time of day.

A hand clutches a breakfast burrito filled with chunks of potato, sausage, and American cheese from Girasol Bakery in South Slope, Brooklyn.
A potato-packed breakfast burrito from Girasol Bakery.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Sunset Park Diner & Donuts

A short distance from Green-Wood Cemetery lies 24-hour fixture Sunset Park Diner & Doughnuts. Slide into a booth by the window and order from a wide-reaching menu with fish and chips, fettuccine alfredo, chicken tacos, disco fries, and — true to its name — doughnuts. They cost less than $2 each, or a dollar more for cruller and “fancy doughnuts.” Cash only.

Related Maps