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A hand with scissors cuts meat on the barbecue grill.
Mapo Korean barbecue in Murray Hill, Queens.
Daniel Krieger/Eater NY

The Best Korean Barbecue Restaurants in New York and New Jersey

Tabletop grilled meats and banchan galore

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Mapo Korean barbecue in Murray Hill, Queens.
| Daniel Krieger/Eater NY

In New York, there are two epicenters of Korean barbecue. With its prevalence of 24/7 karaoke bars and restaurants, Manhattan’s Koreatown put Korean grill houses on the mainstream map. Murray Hill has a more spread-out distribution that feeds the community in Queens, where 60 percent of Korean New Yorkers reside; there, the soju still flows for the ajushis and ajummas (older men and women) on their barbecue outings.

The spectrum of Korean barbecue in New York and New Jersey includes fancy restaurants with super-premium cuts of beef; low-key spots with specialties like duck and seafood, and all-you-can-eat places where you can gorge late into the night.

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The Meat Bros

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Located in a rollicking serpentine space in downtown Fort Lee, the generically named Meat Bros is an all-you-can-eat paradise. Pick from an unlimited selection of meats, many brought to the table frozen with a luxuriant selection of banchan, too.

Tables with silvery ventilation fans overehead.
The Meat Bros’ interior.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Located in a strip mall in Fort Lee, Wooga is one of those newfangled Korean barbecue places that incorporates lots of American steakhouse cuts into its traditional menu, and a fragrant sprig of rosemary rides atop the steaks as they are brought to the table. The banchan are different, too, including pickled ramps, two kinds of kimchi, and white taro root.

Three kinds of marble steak on a chopping block.
Find a steakhouse selection of meats at Wooga.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Sung Book Dong BBQ

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At the eastern end of Queens lies a destination for New York City and Long Island locals drawn to its virtues: big portions, tender meats, warm service, and all-around sublime Korean soul food. The barbecue menu has all of the mainstream hits, along with cuts like prime rib-eye steaks, marinated duck, and thinly sliced beef brisket.

A pair of tongs turns over pieces of raw duck and kimchi on a tabletop grill.
Grilled duck with kimchi at Sun Book Dong.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Goo Gong Tan

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Goo Gong Tan specializes in seafood, and the barbecued clams are a standout. Whole clams are positioned on the grill slats, where they slowly open up, frothing with broth. At that point, the servers reach in with tongs, remove one of the shells, and return the shucked clam on the half shell over the flame. There’s so much more to the seafood grill menu: clams, scallops, shrimp, and mussels topped with gochujang.

Yellow clams bubble over an open flame on a grated grill.
Clams from GooGong Tan.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Hahm Ji Bach

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A Flushing mainstay, Hahm Ji Bach initially catered to the local Korean American community when it opened in 1999, and since catching Michelin’s attention, has been tending to a perennially packed house of destination diners. Its specialty is pork, particularly thick, fatty slabs of samgyupsal (pork belly). Opt for the pork platter to sample slices of spicy tenderloin, spare ribs, and jowl.

Dozens of tiny dishes with bacon on a grill in the middle.
Pork belly with assorted banchan.
Hahm Ji Bach

Yuk Jun Gui

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Yuk Jun Gui is the rare Korean barbecue spot that not only barbecues fresh eel but does so over a wood-fired grill. Those who’ve only tasted eel slathered with the viscous nitsume sauce at sushi spots are in for a treat, with the crisp skin and a dipping sauce of sesame oil with coarse rock salt. The restaurant’s other meats — short rib, bulgogi, offal — are grilled superbly and served with the standard ssamjang and a parade of banchan.

Eel sizzles on a grill.
Grilled eel from Yuk Jun Gui.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Mapo Korean BBQ

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Located in Murray Hill, Queens, just off the picturesque village square, Mapo lies at the heart of a vibrant Korean community. The broad and convivial dining room is usually packed in the evenings (go for lunch if you can), and the place is decorated with pictures of Black Angus cattle to get you in the mood. The menu serves barbecue classics with a wide spread of banchan, and you should end your meal with cold mung-bean vermicelli.

A room filled with diners, with hoods overhead.
The convivial Mapo dining room.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Yoon Haeundae Galbi

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Yoon Haeundae Galbi is the sleek, modern offshoot of a grill house that owner Bobby Yoon’s grandfather opened in Busan in 1964. It revives a tenderizing method invented by the elder Yoon to prepare its premium beef, particularly the namesake galbi. Pick the popular prime package to sample many cuts. Other standouts include bulgogi that’s braised in a sweet broth and an extensive drink menu spanning soju flights to dry reds.

A grill in the middle of the table with strips of pink meat laying on top and white small plates to the sides.
Short rib on the grill.
Irene Yoo/Eater NY

Chilsung Garden

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Chilsung Garden offers spacious digs for group celebrations and an abundance of banchan like seasoned soft tofu, cucumber kimchi, and pickled radish. A variety of grilled meats — like the short rib and rib-eye — can be seen through glass doors in dry aging chambers in the walls of the restaurant. The meats can be ordered a la carte and in combo platters with doenjang chige, a soybean paste stew.

Sushi and four kinds of meat displayed raw.
Chilsung’s five-star combo.
Chilsung Garden

Antoya is classy and chic with a touch of stuffiness that can be forgiven due to the magnificence of its food. The galbi here is scored to maximize marination and Maillard browning. Go all in on beef or pork with the platter options that feature three cuts of each meat. But for dishes seldom found in Korean grill houses, go for the Miyazaki wagyu A5, sliced beef tongue with miso and scallions, or lamb chops.

A table filled with dishes surrounding a tabletop grill with meat on it.
A Korean barbecue spread at Antoya.
Antoya

New Wonjo

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This restaurant doesn’t barbecue over charcoal any more — it was the last place in Koreatown to do so — but the menu remains much the same at the New Wonjo, where a 2010 renovation and ownership changed the longstanding Wonjo. There are a la carte options, but the four combo platters include a good mix of meats like marinated galbi, sliced brisket, and spicy sliced pork. As an added bonus, the place offers a dry-aged ribeye as one of the meat options.

A raw marbled steak with mushrooms and broccoli on the side.
The dry-aged ribeye at New Wonjo.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The highlight of the sophisticated Hyun is its all-you-can-eat wagyu omakase featuring eight to ten cuts of magnificently marbled Japanese Miyazaki A5 within a 90-minute time frame. It’s the rare spot to order wagyu offal like tongue and intestine. The tasting menu is rounded out by other high-end hits like caviar and deep-fried oyster.

Several thin and excessively marbled steaks.
Wagyu beef at Hyun,
Hyun

Baekjeong

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In a sea of Korean barbecue options, Baekjeong remains a top pick for grilled meats in Manhattan. The two-story restaurant opened here in 2014, becoming the first New York branch of a chain restaurant with a handful of locations in California. Meals begin with a generous spread of banchan, plus scrambled eggs and gooey corn cheese. Plates of raw short rib, pork belly, and jowl are sold individually at premium prices ($40 to $80 each), but dinner combos are more affordable. Expect a packed dining room and a wait for tables.

A table at a Korean barbecue restaurant is busy with cheese corn, meats, and banchan.
Overcooked meats and a slab of cheese corn at Baekjeong.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Gopchang Story BBQ

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This branch of a Korean chain is located on the second floor of a loft building on Fifth Avenue, around the corner from the other Korean barbecues. Its specialty — cow intestines — sets it apart. The grilled offal is delicious and the place is packed every night with patrons who also enjoy beef tongue and cheek, tripe, and other meats. Don’t miss the fried rice with egg and cheese at the end of your meal.

A round pan with all sorts of offal cut into small pieces.
An assortment of offal at Gopchang Story.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Wonder Pig K-BBQ

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Wonder Pig invites you to pig out: It’s another all-you-can-eat restaurant located in an industrial-looking space, where you mark your selections on a checklist. The banchan are as usual, and cheerfully replenished when you run out.

A sausage, heap of shaved brisket, and red-sauced pork on a concave griddle.
The bare-bones interior of Wonder Pig.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Cote Korean Steakhouse

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Cote stepped into the scene in 2017, as a cool-kid pioneer of high-end fusion fine dining. It’s zeroed in on the connection between American steakhouses and Korean American barbecue and turns out cuts like a New York strip and filet mignon with treatments like lettuce wraps and sides like banchan (egg souffle, kimchi) and stews. The Butcher’s Feast presents a good sampling of Cote’s high-end sourcing — only USDA prime, American wagyu, and Japanese wagyu.

An overhead photograph of plates of banchan surrounding a Korean barbecue grill
Cote is the city’s only Michelin-starred Korean barbecue spot.
Gary He/Eater NY

The Meat Bros

Located in a rollicking serpentine space in downtown Fort Lee, the generically named Meat Bros is an all-you-can-eat paradise. Pick from an unlimited selection of meats, many brought to the table frozen with a luxuriant selection of banchan, too.

Tables with silvery ventilation fans overehead.
The Meat Bros’ interior.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Wooga

Located in a strip mall in Fort Lee, Wooga is one of those newfangled Korean barbecue places that incorporates lots of American steakhouse cuts into its traditional menu, and a fragrant sprig of rosemary rides atop the steaks as they are brought to the table. The banchan are different, too, including pickled ramps, two kinds of kimchi, and white taro root.

Three kinds of marble steak on a chopping block.
Find a steakhouse selection of meats at Wooga.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Sung Book Dong BBQ

At the eastern end of Queens lies a destination for New York City and Long Island locals drawn to its virtues: big portions, tender meats, warm service, and all-around sublime Korean soul food. The barbecue menu has all of the mainstream hits, along with cuts like prime rib-eye steaks, marinated duck, and thinly sliced beef brisket.

A pair of tongs turns over pieces of raw duck and kimchi on a tabletop grill.
Grilled duck with kimchi at Sun Book Dong.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Goo Gong Tan

Goo Gong Tan specializes in seafood, and the barbecued clams are a standout. Whole clams are positioned on the grill slats, where they slowly open up, frothing with broth. At that point, the servers reach in with tongs, remove one of the shells, and return the shucked clam on the half shell over the flame. There’s so much more to the seafood grill menu: clams, scallops, shrimp, and mussels topped with gochujang.

Yellow clams bubble over an open flame on a grated grill.
Clams from GooGong Tan.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Hahm Ji Bach

A Flushing mainstay, Hahm Ji Bach initially catered to the local Korean American community when it opened in 1999, and since catching Michelin’s attention, has been tending to a perennially packed house of destination diners. Its specialty is pork, particularly thick, fatty slabs of samgyupsal (pork belly). Opt for the pork platter to sample slices of spicy tenderloin, spare ribs, and jowl.

Dozens of tiny dishes with bacon on a grill in the middle.
Pork belly with assorted banchan.
Hahm Ji Bach

Yuk Jun Gui

Yuk Jun Gui is the rare Korean barbecue spot that not only barbecues fresh eel but does so over a wood-fired grill. Those who’ve only tasted eel slathered with the viscous nitsume sauce at sushi spots are in for a treat, with the crisp skin and a dipping sauce of sesame oil with coarse rock salt. The restaurant’s other meats — short rib, bulgogi, offal — are grilled superbly and served with the standard ssamjang and a parade of banchan.

Eel sizzles on a grill.
Grilled eel from Yuk Jun Gui.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Mapo Korean BBQ

Located in Murray Hill, Queens, just off the picturesque village square, Mapo lies at the heart of a vibrant Korean community. The broad and convivial dining room is usually packed in the evenings (go for lunch if you can), and the place is decorated with pictures of Black Angus cattle to get you in the mood. The menu serves barbecue classics with a wide spread of banchan, and you should end your meal with cold mung-bean vermicelli.

A room filled with diners, with hoods overhead.
The convivial Mapo dining room.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Yoon Haeundae Galbi

Yoon Haeundae Galbi is the sleek, modern offshoot of a grill house that owner Bobby Yoon’s grandfather opened in Busan in 1964. It revives a tenderizing method invented by the elder Yoon to prepare its premium beef, particularly the namesake galbi. Pick the popular prime package to sample many cuts. Other standouts include bulgogi that’s braised in a sweet broth and an extensive drink menu spanning soju flights to dry reds.

A grill in the middle of the table with strips of pink meat laying on top and white small plates to the sides.
Short rib on the grill.
Irene Yoo/Eater NY

Chilsung Garden

Chilsung Garden offers spacious digs for group celebrations and an abundance of banchan like seasoned soft tofu, cucumber kimchi, and pickled radish. A variety of grilled meats — like the short rib and rib-eye — can be seen through glass doors in dry aging chambers in the walls of the restaurant. The meats can be ordered a la carte and in combo platters with doenjang chige, a soybean paste stew.

Sushi and four kinds of meat displayed raw.
Chilsung’s five-star combo.
Chilsung Garden

Antoya

Antoya is classy and chic with a touch of stuffiness that can be forgiven due to the magnificence of its food. The galbi here is scored to maximize marination and Maillard browning. Go all in on beef or pork with the platter options that feature three cuts of each meat. But for dishes seldom found in Korean grill houses, go for the Miyazaki wagyu A5, sliced beef tongue with miso and scallions, or lamb chops.

A table filled with dishes surrounding a tabletop grill with meat on it.
A Korean barbecue spread at Antoya.
Antoya

New Wonjo

This restaurant doesn’t barbecue over charcoal any more — it was the last place in Koreatown to do so — but the menu remains much the same at the New Wonjo, where a 2010 renovation and ownership changed the longstanding Wonjo. There are a la carte options, but the four combo platters include a good mix of meats like marinated galbi, sliced brisket, and spicy sliced pork. As an added bonus, the place offers a dry-aged ribeye as one of the meat options.

A raw marbled steak with mushrooms and broccoli on the side.
The dry-aged ribeye at New Wonjo.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Hyun

The highlight of the sophisticated Hyun is its all-you-can-eat wagyu omakase featuring eight to ten cuts of magnificently marbled Japanese Miyazaki A5 within a 90-minute time frame. It’s the rare spot to order wagyu offal like tongue and intestine. The tasting menu is rounded out by other high-end hits like caviar and deep-fried oyster.

Several thin and excessively marbled steaks.
Wagyu beef at Hyun,
Hyun

Baekjeong

In a sea of Korean barbecue options, Baekjeong remains a top pick for grilled meats in Manhattan. The two-story restaurant opened here in 2014, becoming the first New York branch of a chain restaurant with a handful of locations in California. Meals begin with a generous spread of banchan, plus scrambled eggs and gooey corn cheese. Plates of raw short rib, pork belly, and jowl are sold individually at premium prices ($40 to $80 each), but dinner combos are more affordable. Expect a packed dining room and a wait for tables.

A table at a Korean barbecue restaurant is busy with cheese corn, meats, and banchan.
Overcooked meats and a slab of cheese corn at Baekjeong.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Gopchang Story BBQ

This branch of a Korean chain is located on the second floor of a loft building on Fifth Avenue, around the corner from the other Korean barbecues. Its specialty — cow intestines — sets it apart. The grilled offal is delicious and the place is packed every night with patrons who also enjoy beef tongue and cheek, tripe, and other meats. Don’t miss the fried rice with egg and cheese at the end of your meal.

A round pan with all sorts of offal cut into small pieces.
An assortment of offal at Gopchang Story.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Wonder Pig K-BBQ

Wonder Pig invites you to pig out: It’s another all-you-can-eat restaurant located in an industrial-looking space, where you mark your selections on a checklist. The banchan are as usual, and cheerfully replenished when you run out.

A sausage, heap of shaved brisket, and red-sauced pork on a concave griddle.
The bare-bones interior of Wonder Pig.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Related Maps

Cote Korean Steakhouse

Cote stepped into the scene in 2017, as a cool-kid pioneer of high-end fusion fine dining. It’s zeroed in on the connection between American steakhouses and Korean American barbecue and turns out cuts like a New York strip and filet mignon with treatments like lettuce wraps and sides like banchan (egg souffle, kimchi) and stews. The Butcher’s Feast presents a good sampling of Cote’s high-end sourcing — only USDA prime, American wagyu, and Japanese wagyu.

An overhead photograph of plates of banchan surrounding a Korean barbecue grill
Cote is the city’s only Michelin-starred Korean barbecue spot.
Gary He/Eater NY

Related Maps