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A fish plate from Okonomi
A fish plate from Okonomi
Nick Solares

14 NYC Restaurants That Feel Like Japan

From sterling omakases to rowdy izakaya, here’s where to eat in NYC to feel transported to Japan

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A fish plate from Okonomi
| Nick Solares

For years, West Coast cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco dominated the United States’s Japanese dining scene, with wonderfully faithful experiences found at restaurants like Beverly Hills’ longstanding Urasawa and San Mateo’s newer import Sushi Yoshizumi. But over the last decade, and really in the last five years, New York City has welcomed an unprecedented spate of dining concepts that feel and taste so genuinely Japanese, that dining at a top omakase haunt in the homeland might not feel like as much of a revelation as it would have 10 or 15 years ago.

Today, New York offers yakitori based with a 50-year-old tare sauce, elusive species of hyper seasonal uni, and bars that stock more Japanese whisky than most even in Tokyo. Below, 15 of NYC’s most transportive Japanese dining and drinking concepts.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Torishin

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362 W 53rd St
New York, NY 10019
(212) 757-0108
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Torishin pays tribute to the bird, and this Michelin-starred restaurant is one of the world’s top yakitori joints outside of Japan. Chef and owner Shu Ikeda trained at Toriyoshi in Tokyo, and he initially opened Torishin in 2006 on the Upper East Side, before relocating to Midtown West in 2016, earning three stars from the Times and Eater along the way. On offer are three set menus ($60, $65, $160), plus a la carte skewers, that include various cuts of skewered chicken and seasonal vegetables. Ikeda sources his umami-rich, free range jidori birds from an Amish farm in Pennsylvania, and before grilling over high-grade kishu binchotan, he brushes the meat with a 50-year-old tare sauce that the chef brought over from Toriyoshi. The most expensive set menu is also the most immersive, fusing kaiseki-style dining with more adventurous cuts like chicken tail, gizzard, and heart. The space is decked out in 500-year-old hinoki wood assembled via a technique known as kumiko, in which wooden bars are crossed and laid to form minus without any nails.

Torishin Nick Solares

2. Sushi Amane

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245 East 44th Street Lower Level
New York, NY 10017
(212) 986-5300
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Tucked one level below French-Japanese hybrid Mifune, Sushi Amane is the cozy, eight-seat edomae omakase bar helmed by Shion Uino, who relocated to New York after nearly a decade at one of Tokyo’s most prized fish counters, three-Michelin-starred Sushi Saito. Within a blonde wood-bedecked minimalist space, Uino shapes approximately 18 courses hinged around wild-caught, sterling seasonal seafood. His $250 omakase spans from otsumami (appetizers) to a succession of nigiri carefully formed using rice seasoned with a blend of Japanese salts and red vinegars. Using connections from Japan, Uino sources rare cuts of fish, like longtooth grouper, and a plethora of exceedingly scarce types of uni, which only become available at certain times of year. For example, Uino offers Murasaki uni from Hokkaido, which most restaurants can’t afford to serve, along with Murasaki uni from his hometown, the islands of Amakusa in Kumamoto. Though Amane is a New York restaurant, it could easily live in Tokyo.

Sushi Amane’s sushi bar counter has yellow wood, with a chef wearing white standing in the middle. Sushi Amane [Official Photo]

3. Kajitsu

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125 E 39th St
New York, NY 10016
(212) 228-4873
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One-Michelin-starred Kajitsu serves a type of cuisine that’s hard to find outside of Japan: vegetarian shojin ryori. Shojin ryori predates kaiseki ryori, and was the original type of food served at Zen Buddhist temples. Consider Kajitsu’s two tasting menu options (eight courses for $95, 10 courses for $125) to be a meat-free form of kaiseki, emphasizing balance and harmony, and cooking preparations which seek to coax out the inherent flavor of each individual seasonal ingredient. Expect to try dishes such as sake lees soup, daikon rice, fried winter mushroom with gingko nut, and daikon with yuzu. Grab a seat at the minimalist blonde wood counter, or for larger parties there’s a simple dining room with tables.

Rice and pickles on a tray with chopsticks at Kajitsu Nick Solares

4. Tempura Matsui

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224 E 39th St
New York, NY 10016
(212) 986-8885
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While in the U.S. the word omakase — which translates to “chef’s choice” — has become synonymous with sushi, in Japan one will find myriad omakase menus, from yakitori to tempura. Tempura Matsui hit New York about three years back, and it’s the city’s first omakase tempura restaurant, serving set menus ($40, $60 for lunch; $120, $165, $220 for dinner) that change four times per year. In Japan, what separates good tempura from great tempura is not only the quality of ingredients sourced, but more importantly the batter into which the ingredients are dunked, then fried. Proper tempura batter will coat ingredients like a delicate veil, and a true shokunin (craftsman) will place those fried bites onto a small sheet of folded tempura paper in front of a guest, leaving no oily residue on that paper. Tempura Matsui, designed to look like a temple, offers a version extremely close to what one will encounter at some of Tokyo’s top haunts. Depending on the season, a menu will span from shiso and uni tempura to sweet potato and scallop. Sadly Tempura Matsui’s original chef, after which the place was named, died two years ago, but the restaurant has been able to maintain its Michelin star nonetheless.

5. Takashi

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456 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 414-2929
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In Japanese, “yaki” means grill, while “niku” means meat. Takashi is a 34-seat yakiniku restaurant dressed in wood, with rustic tables outfitted with individual grills that replicate the heat emitted by a charcoal flame. Just like at a Korean barbecue restaurant, diners order off the menu, and raw proteins land tableside, for a cook-your-own meal. While there’s an assortment of cooked appetizers, the focus is on carefully sourced premium beef (including wagyu) from sustainable farms in upstate New York and Japan. There’s both wagyu from Miyazaki, plus an American take on the buttery beef, alongside more adventurous cuts like tongue, stomach, and intestines. Takashi debuted in 2010 from the late chef Takashi Inoue and quickly become a New York fixture for its excellent beef and spartan Japanese look.

Takashi Kevin M./Yelp

6. Hi-Collar

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214 E 10th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 777-7018
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Hi-Collar offers Japanese culture two ways, as a kissaten (a Western-inspired Japanese coffee/tea cafe) by day and izakaya and sake bar by night. During the day, drop by for siphon coffee and a classic kissaten menu of katsu-sandos, omurice (fried rice omelette), and pancakes. Meanwhile, come 6 p.m., charcoal-grilled squid and rice wine take over. Owner Sakura Yagi explains the cafe’s moniker and concept: “Hi-Collar or haikara, is a term that evolved to mean avant-garde; high-collared Western shirts were considered to be modern compared to traditional Japanese kimono.” The narrow, counter-style restaurant is reminiscent of the Japanese Jazz Age, with a mix of sliding shoji screens, stained glass doors, and Tiffany-style pendant lights.

Hi-Collar Kat Odell

7. Sake Bar Decibel

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240 E 9th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 979-2733
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Follow the red “On Air” sign hanging overhead, descend one level below the street, and step into dark, cavernous, graffiti-covered Sake Bar Decibel, which feels like a direct portal into any of Golden Gai’s miniscule, unpretentious, divey bars. Since 1993, Decibel has been an industry favorite beloved for its no-frills ambiance, wide selection of 150 sakes, and late hours. It’s open until 3 a.m. every day other than Sunday for Japanese bar food like okonomiyaki (savory pancake), takowasa (octopus with wasabi), and ankimo (monkfish liver, regarded as the foie gras of the sea).

A person behind the bar at Sake Bar Decibel Robert Sietsema

8. Kyo Ya

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94 E 7th St
New York, NY 10009

Kyo Ya bears no signage, belying what lies within: one of New York’s very first kaiseki restaurants, and still a hidden gem nearly 12 years later despite a Michelin star. On its below-ground space, polished wood shines within the intimate 36-seat eatery that’s divided by sliding shoji screens, with imported Japanese tiles, tatami mats, and rice paper lamps creating a serene escape from busy Manhattan. Here, the star is traditional, elegant kaiseki, eight seasonal courses for $150, with many ingredients flown over from Japan. Following classic kaiseki progression, expect to start with sakizuke (amuse) like fried taro with crispy shrimp and miso, followed by assorted zensai (small appetizers) like cod fish milt made in chawanmushi-style. Soup, sashimi, a grilled dish, a fish dish, rice, miso soup, and seasonal fruit follow. There is a short a la carte menu available, too.

Kyo Ya Mayumi Ando for Kyo Ya/Facebook

9. Bar Goto

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245 Eldridge St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 475-4411
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Encompassing just 600 square feet, Bar Goto replicates the feeling of drinking in a tiny Japanese pub, of which there are millions spread through the country. Somehow owner Kenta Goto fit 40 seats into that diminutive space, decorated with warm wood, and here the Pegu Club alum serves a short list of cocktails made with Japanese ingredients (think dashi and sakura blossoms) that reflect his time in both New York and Tokyo. To soak up the booze, there are top-notch bar snacks like okonomiyaki and ume (plum) vinegar octopus.

Bar Goto Nick Solares

10. 29B Teahouse

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29 Avenue B
New York, NY 10009
(646) 864-0093
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Stefen Ramirez operated Tea Dealers as a rare tea import organization for two-and-a-half years before relocating from Williamsburg to Alphabet City in 2018 and opening his quaint, 33-seat cafe. Here Ramirez serves naturally grown, unblended, single cultivar teas, along with sake and tea-infused soju, sourced from Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, and India. There’s also a concise collection of tea-friendly Japanese dishes like the cafe’s signature ochazuke, rice served with marinated king salmon, house-made pickles, and tea. While menus change every two months or so, 29B’s ethos remains constant: to offer some of the world’s most rare teas, with a focus on those from Japan. Every so often you’ll find a contemporary nod, as found in the cafe’s famed matcha beer. An earthy palate of grey and honied wood give the space a sense of calm.

11. Yopparai

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151 Rivington St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 777-7253
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Modeled after an upscale izakaya — a bar that serves food which complements booze — Yopparai has been feeding guests salted squid guts beside an expertly curated list of approximately 50 sakes since 2012. The space itself is narrow and intimate, with most of the restaurant’s 30 seats dedicated to a bar that spans its length. Behind that counter, chefs prepare a lengthy menu of mostly small dishes using a variety of cooking methods: fried, roasted, simmered, and raw. Some dishes are more familiar, like sashimi and agedashi tofu, but Yopparai shines with the lesser-found bites, such as tofu stuffed with mochi, and chopped wasabi with sake lees. The restaurant even opened its sophomore effort in Tokyo in January 2019.

12. Shoji at 69 Leonard Street

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69 Leonard St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 404-4600
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Kaiseki meets sushi via Shoji at 69 Leonard, the Japanese pop-up turned permanent concept that replaced Ichimura in 2018. Chef Derek Wilcox — who recently earned three stars from the Times — spent seven years at three-Michelin-starred Kikunoi in Kyoto, and he brings to New York one of the most faithful Japanese dining experiences the city offers. Within an unadorned, blonde wood, 10-seat counter space, Wilcox plates three weekly-changing omakase menus ($190, $252, $295, all gratuity included) rife with rare and hyper seasonal Japanese ingredients. Hamo (pike conder eel) sashimi, kan buri (winter amerjack) marinated in sake lees, and namako (sea cucumber) tenerized in green tea all make appearances. The menu commences with a series of otsumami (appetizers) and kaiseki-inspired small plates before moving into around 10 drops of nigiri, followed by temaki, soup, and dessert.

13. Okonomi

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150 Ainslie St
Brooklyn, NY 11211

Tiny little Okonomi is driven by the Japanese philosophies of chi san chi sho (locally grown, locally consumed) and mottainai (no waste). The 12-seat restaurant feels like one of the millions of cramped Japanese cafes that can fit just a handful of humans. During the day, until 3 p.m., stop in for a daily-changing $20 to $35 set menu (no tipping here) that mirrors a style of breakfast common throughout Japan: rice, miso soup, a slice of roasted fish, and various veggies. During the evening, Yuji Ramen takes over with an a la carte menu dedicated to seafood ramens and mazemens (no-broth ramen). Coming back to the no-waste philosophy, the restaurant takes the bones from the fish it serves in the morning and cooks them all day for ramen that night.

Okonomi Nick Solares

14. Ichiran NY Brooklyn

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374 Johnson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11206
(718) 381-0491
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Ramen is often a solo sport in Japan, with people quickly ducking into a shop during lunch for a fast bowl of soupy hot noodles. Which is why Japanese ramen chain export Ichiran offers customers solo dining booths, for patrons to slurp its famous Fukuoka tonkotsu broth in silence. In fact, Ichiran serves just one type of ramen, and this focus enables the place to concert efforts on perfecting that bowl. However, customers can customize bowls by ordering extra noodles, pork, or adding a dash of black vinegar. After launching in 2016 and attracting lengthy lines, Ichiran opened a second, smaller outlet in Midtown.

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1. Torishin

362 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019
Torishin Nick Solares

Torishin pays tribute to the bird, and this Michelin-starred restaurant is one of the world’s top yakitori joints outside of Japan. Chef and owner Shu Ikeda trained at Toriyoshi in Tokyo, and he initially opened Torishin in 2006 on the Upper East Side, before relocating to Midtown West in 2016, earning three stars from the Times and Eater along the way. On offer are three set menus ($60, $65, $160), plus a la carte skewers, that include various cuts of skewered chicken and seasonal vegetables. Ikeda sources his umami-rich, free range jidori birds from an Amish farm in Pennsylvania, and before grilling over high-grade kishu binchotan, he brushes the meat with a 50-year-old tare sauce that the chef brought over from Toriyoshi. The most expensive set menu is also the most immersive, fusing kaiseki-style dining with more adventurous cuts like chicken tail, gizzard, and heart. The space is decked out in 500-year-old hinoki wood assembled via a technique known as kumiko, in which wooden bars are crossed and laid to form minus without any nails.

362 W 53rd St
New York, NY 10019

2. Sushi Amane

245 East 44th Street Lower Level, New York, NY 10017
Sushi Amane’s sushi bar counter has yellow wood, with a chef wearing white standing in the middle. Sushi Amane [Official Photo]

Tucked one level below French-Japanese hybrid Mifune, Sushi Amane is the cozy, eight-seat edomae omakase bar helmed by Shion Uino, who relocated to New York after nearly a decade at one of Tokyo’s most prized fish counters, three-Michelin-starred Sushi Saito. Within a blonde wood-bedecked minimalist space, Uino shapes approximately 18 courses hinged around wild-caught, sterling seasonal seafood. His $250 omakase spans from otsumami (appetizers) to a succession of nigiri carefully formed using rice seasoned with a blend of Japanese salts and red vinegars. Using connections from Japan, Uino sources rare cuts of fish, like longtooth grouper, and a plethora of exceedingly scarce types of uni, which only become available at certain times of year. For example, Uino offers Murasaki uni from Hokkaido, which most restaurants can’t afford to serve, along with Murasaki uni from his hometown, the islands of Amakusa in Kumamoto. Though Amane is a New York restaurant, it could easily live in Tokyo.

245 East 44th Street Lower Level
New York, NY 10017

3. Kajitsu

125 E 39th St, New York, NY 10016
Rice and pickles on a tray with chopsticks at Kajitsu Nick Solares

One-Michelin-starred Kajitsu serves a type of cuisine that’s hard to find outside of Japan: vegetarian shojin ryori. Shojin ryori predates kaiseki ryori, and was the original type of food served at Zen Buddhist temples. Consider Kajitsu’s two tasting menu options (eight courses for $95, 10 courses for $125) to be a meat-free form of kaiseki, emphasizing balance and harmony, and cooking preparations which seek to coax out the inherent flavor of each individual seasonal ingredient. Expect to try dishes such as sake lees soup, daikon rice, fried winter mushroom with gingko nut, and daikon with yuzu. Grab a seat at the minimalist blonde wood counter, or for larger parties there’s a simple dining room with tables.

125 E 39th St
New York, NY 10016

4. Tempura Matsui

224 E 39th St, New York, NY 10016

While in the U.S. the word omakase — which translates to “chef’s choice” — has become synonymous with sushi, in Japan one will find myriad omakase menus, from yakitori to tempura. Tempura Matsui hit New York about three years back, and it’s the city’s first omakase tempura restaurant, serving set menus ($40, $60 for lunch; $120, $165, $220 for dinner) that change four times per year. In Japan, what separates good tempura from great tempura is not only the quality of ingredients sourced, but more importantly the batter into which the ingredients are dunked, then fried. Proper tempura batter will coat ingredients like a delicate veil, and a true shokunin (craftsman) will place those fried bites onto a small sheet of folded tempura paper in front of a guest, leaving no oily residue on that paper. Tempura Matsui, designed to look like a temple, offers a version extremely close to what one will encounter at some of Tokyo’s top haunts. Depending on the season, a menu will span from shiso and uni tempura to sweet potato and scallop. Sadly Tempura Matsui’s original chef, after which the place was named, died two years ago, but the restaurant has been able to maintain its Michelin star nonetheless.

224 E 39th St
New York, NY 10016

5. Takashi

456 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
Takashi Kevin M./Yelp

In Japanese, “yaki” means grill, while “niku” means meat. Takashi is a 34-seat yakiniku restaurant dressed in wood, with rustic tables outfitted with individual grills that replicate the heat emitted by a charcoal flame. Just like at a Korean barbecue restaurant, diners order off the menu, and raw proteins land tableside, for a cook-your-own meal. While there’s an assortment of cooked appetizers, the focus is on carefully sourced premium beef (including wagyu) from sustainable farms in upstate New York and Japan. There’s both wagyu from Miyazaki, plus an American take on the buttery beef, alongside more adventurous cuts like tongue, stomach, and intestines. Takashi debuted in 2010 from the late chef Takashi Inoue and quickly become a New York fixture for its excellent beef and spartan Japanese look.

456 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

6. Hi-Collar

214 E 10th St, New York, NY 10003
Hi-Collar Kat Odell

Hi-Collar offers Japanese culture two ways, as a kissaten (a Western-inspired Japanese coffee/tea cafe) by day and izakaya and sake bar by night. During the day, drop by for siphon coffee and a classic kissaten menu of katsu-sandos, omurice (fried rice omelette), and pancakes. Meanwhile, come 6 p.m., charcoal-grilled squid and rice wine take over. Owner Sakura Yagi explains the cafe’s moniker and concept: “Hi-Collar or haikara, is a term that evolved to mean avant-garde; high-collared Western shirts were considered to be modern compared to traditional Japanese kimono.” The narrow, counter-style restaurant is reminiscent of the Japanese Jazz Age, with a mix of sliding shoji screens, stained glass doors, and Tiffany-style pendant lights.

214 E 10th St
New York, NY 10003

7. Sake Bar Decibel

240 E 9th St, New York, NY 10003
A person behind the bar at Sake Bar Decibel Robert Sietsema

Follow the red “On Air” sign hanging overhead, descend one level below the street, and step into dark, cavernous, graffiti-covered Sake Bar Decibel, which feels like a direct portal into any of Golden Gai’s miniscule, unpretentious, divey bars. Since 1993, Decibel has been an industry favorite beloved for its no-frills ambiance, wide selection of 150 sakes, and late hours. It’s open until 3 a.m. every day other than Sunday for Japanese bar food like okonomiyaki (savory pancake), takowasa (octopus with wasabi), and ankimo (monkfish liver, regarded as the foie gras of the sea).

240 E 9th St
New York, NY 10003

8. Kyo Ya

94 E 7th St, New York, NY 10009
Kyo Ya Mayumi Ando for Kyo Ya/Facebook

Kyo Ya bears no signage, belying what lies within: one of New York’s very first kaiseki restaurants, and still a hidden gem nearly 12 years later despite a Michelin star. On its below-ground space, polished wood shines within the intimate 36-seat eatery that’s divided by sliding shoji screens, with imported Japanese tiles, tatami mats, and rice paper lamps creating a serene escape from busy Manhattan. Here, the star is traditional, elegant kaiseki, eight seasonal courses for $150, with many ingredients flown over from Japan. Following classic kaiseki progression, expect to start with sakizuke (amuse) like fried taro with crispy shrimp and miso, followed by assorted zensai (small appetizers) like cod fish milt made in chawanmushi-style. Soup, sashimi, a grilled dish, a fish dish, rice, miso soup, and seasonal fruit follow. There is a short a la carte menu available, too.

94 E 7th St
New York, NY 10009

9. Bar Goto

245 Eldridge St, New York, NY 10002
Bar Goto Nick Solares

Encompassing just 600 square feet, Bar Goto replicates the feeling of drinking in a tiny Japanese pub, of which there are millions spread through the country. Somehow owner Kenta Goto fit 40 seats into that diminutive space, decorated with warm wood, and here the Pegu Club alum serves a short list of cocktails made with Japanese ingredients (think dashi and sakura blossoms) that reflect his time in both New York and Tokyo. To soak up the booze, there are top-notch bar snacks like okonomiyaki and ume (plum) vinegar octopus.

245 Eldridge St
New York, NY 10002

10. 29B Teahouse

29 Avenue B, New York, NY 10009

Stefen Ramirez operated Tea Dealers as a rare tea import organization for two-and-a-half years before relocating from Williamsburg to Alphabet City in 2018 and opening his quaint, 33-seat cafe. Here Ramirez serves naturally grown, unblended, single cultivar teas, along with sake and tea-infused soju, sourced from Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, and India. There’s also a concise collection of tea-friendly Japanese dishes like the cafe’s signature ochazuke, rice served with marinated king salmon, house-made pickles, and tea. While menus change every two months or so, 29B’s ethos remains constant: to offer some of the world’s most rare teas, with a focus on those from Japan. Every so often you’ll find a contemporary nod, as found in the cafe’s famed matcha beer. An earthy palate of grey and honied wood give the space a sense of calm.

29 Avenue B
New York, NY 10009

11. Yopparai

151 Rivington St, New York, NY 10002

Modeled after an upscale izakaya — a bar that serves food which complements booze — Yopparai has been feeding guests salted squid guts beside an expertly curated list of approximately 50 sakes since 2012. The space itself is narrow and intimate, with most of the restaurant’s 30 seats dedicated to a bar that spans its length. Behind that counter, chefs prepare a lengthy menu of mostly small dishes using a variety of cooking methods: fried, roasted, simmered, and raw. Some dishes are more familiar, like sashimi and agedashi tofu, but Yopparai shines with the lesser-found bites, such as tofu stuffed with mochi, and chopped wasabi with sake lees. The restaurant even opened its sophomore effort in Tokyo in January 2019.

151 Rivington St
New York, NY 10002

12. Shoji at 69 Leonard Street

69 Leonard St, New York, NY 10013

Kaiseki meets sushi via Shoji at 69 Leonard, the Japanese pop-up turned permanent concept that replaced Ichimura in 2018. Chef Derek Wilcox — who recently earned three stars from the Times — spent seven years at three-Michelin-starred Kikunoi in Kyoto, and he brings to New York one of the most faithful Japanese dining experiences the city offers. Within an unadorned, blonde wood, 10-seat counter space, Wilcox plates three weekly-changing omakase menus ($190, $252, $295, all gratuity included) rife with rare and hyper seasonal Japanese ingredients. Hamo (pike conder eel) sashimi, kan buri (winter amerjack) marinated in sake lees, and namako (sea cucumber) tenerized in green tea all make appearances. The menu commences with a series of otsumami (appetizers) and kaiseki-inspired small plates before moving into around 10 drops of nigiri, followed by temaki, soup, and dessert.

69 Leonard St
New York, NY 10013

13. Okonomi

150 Ainslie St, Brooklyn, NY 11211
Okonomi Nick Solares

Tiny little Okonomi is driven by the Japanese philosophies of chi san chi sho (locally grown, locally consumed) and mottainai (no waste). The 12-seat restaurant feels like one of the millions of cramped Japanese cafes that can fit just a handful of humans. During the day, until 3 p.m., stop in for a daily-changing $20 to $35 set menu (no tipping here) that mirrors a style of breakfast common throughout Japan: rice, miso soup, a slice of roasted fish, and various veggies. During the evening, Yuji Ramen takes over with an a la carte menu dedicated to seafood ramens and mazemens (no-broth ramen). Coming back to the no-waste philosophy, the restaurant takes the bones from the fish it serves in the morning and cooks them all day for ramen that night.

150 Ainslie St
Brooklyn, NY 11211

14. Ichiran NY Brooklyn

374 Johnson Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Ramen is often a solo sport in Japan, with people quickly ducking into a shop during lunch for a fast bowl of soupy hot noodles. Which is why Japanese ramen chain export Ichiran offers customers solo dining booths, for patrons to slurp its famous Fukuoka tonkotsu broth in silence. In fact, Ichiran serves just one type of ramen, and this focus enables the place to concert efforts on perfecting that bowl. However, customers can customize bowls by ordering extra noodles, pork, or adding a dash of black vinegar. After launching in 2016 and attracting lengthy lines, Ichiran opened a second, smaller outlet in Midtown.

374 Johnson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11206

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