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A table with multi-colored chairs in the foreground, set against a backdrop of the Manhattan skyline.
A rooftop view from Laser Wolf at the Hoxton in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

13 Hotel Restaurants in NYC Not Just For Tourists

From Roosevelt Island to the Lower East Side, hotel restaurants are no longer just catering to out-of-towners

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A rooftop view from Laser Wolf at the Hoxton in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.
| Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Not long ago, this is a phrase nobody would say in NYC: Some of New York’s most exciting restaurants are located inside of hotels. Too often, these spaces seemed to cater more to tourists and people with expense accounts than actual residents of the city. Business breakfasts and leisurely lunches are still common in many of these establishments, but today, they’ve also evolved to become destinations for happy hours and celebratory dinners. While the price point at many of these venues skew on the higher side — it’s still in a hotel, after all — many of these restaurants are among the most popular dinner reservations in town.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it also poses a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

The Mark Restaurant by Jean-Georges

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Jean-Georges Vongerichten's ritzy restaurant inside the Mark Hotel is a splurge. Exhibit A: the black truffle pizza, which makes a great snack at the bar or a starter in the elegant dining room. The menu also includes steaks, light vegetable dishes, and simply prepared proteins. On a weeknight, the bar is filled with locals and sometimes a celebrity or two.

Dowling's at The Carlyle

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The famed Bemelmans Bar may garner all the attention at the Carlyle, but it’s not the spot for a proper sit-down dinner. The hotel’s restaurant, once simply called the Carlyle, was closed for nearly two years before it reopened in fall 2021 as Dowling’s. The kitchen, under the direction of former 21 Club chef Sylvain Delpique, nods to fine dining in the 1930s and 1940s with dishes like steak Diane and salt-crusted branzino filleted tableside.

An ornate dining room decorated with paintings, chandelier, chairs, tables, and big mirror on one wall.
The dining room at Dowling’s.
Alex Staniloff/Dowling’s at the Carlyle

The Regency Bar & Grill

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The Loews Regency Hotel isn’t situated in a neighborhood dotted with trendy natural wine bars or restaurants led by big name chefs, but the Regency Bar & Grill located on the first floor is still going strong as the power breakfast stop in town. It’s not uncommon to find black town cars lined up outside in the early mornings as people gather for meetings. For those joining the morning ritual, expect the typical diner fare but with egg dishes around the $30 mark or more.

A dining room with booths and walls with framed photos and light fixtures.
The Regency Bar & Grill is known as a power breakfast scene.
The Regency Bar & Grill

Burger Joint

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For years, Burger Joint was known as the "hidden" burger stand inside the Le Parker Meridien hotel (which is now the Thompson Central Park). It still draws crowds and is a regular on Eater’s best burgers list. The burgers can also be found in two other locations — Industry City in Brooklyn and the Moynihan food hall at Penn Station — but the Midtown spot is still a favorite.

Burger Joint’s burger
The cheeseburger from the Burger Joint.
Nick Solares/Eater NY

Anything At All

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Even for diehard New Yorkers, Roosevelt Island was a never a destination for eating or drinking. But the opening of the Graduate Hotel last summer included a notable restaurant by restaurateurs Marc Rose and Med Abrous of LA-based hospitality group Call Mom (they opened LA spots like Winsome and Genghis Cohen) and helmed by chef Megan Brown. The menu puts little twists on dishes you’d expect to find at a hotel restaurant: a burger gets the addition of thick-cut pepper bacon and pickled green tomatoes while duck is used instead of chicken for wings.

A light-filled dining room with floor to ceiling windows and blue-accented chairs.
The dining room at Anything At All.
Steve Freihon/Graduate Hotel

Ai Fiori

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This Italian restaurant at the luxurious Langham hotel has long floated under the radar, even when it was one of chef Michael White’s restaurants. The one-Michelin-starred spot is easier to get into than other, similar kitchens serving fluke crudo or bowls of spaghetti tossed with fresh crab meat. A lounge area to the right of the bar is also a fine place for a casual business meeting or happy hour.

A white table clothed table with three white bowls of Italian food, including pasta, and a glass of white wine.
A spread of dishes at Ai Fiori.
Louise Palmberg/Altamarea Group

Cathédrale

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The Moxy hotel’s East Village location very much has a clubstaurant vibe — after all, it’s located across from Webster Hall and is operated by Tao Group. But the French-meets-Mediterranean restaurant doesn’t cut corners under chef Jason Hall. Diners can go the luxe route with caviar-topped oysters or bowls of fettuccine showered with black truffles. But there are more simple dishes like burgers, grilled seafood, and chocolate souffle.

A wide view of a dining room with golden curtains, chandliers, and tables.
The subterranean restaurant Cathédrale at the Moxy East Village.
Cathédrale

Shaun Hergatt’s reputation as a fine dining chef is well documented from his run at NYC restaurants like SHO and Juni (both earned Michelin recognition). At Vestry, which opened during the first year of the pandemic, the accolades have been quieter as pricier dining options took a backseat to takeout and more affordable menus. Still, the seafood- and vegetable-forward cooking with some Japanese influences is leagues better than most hotel restaurant fare.

An empty dining room with wide windows, black tables and chairs, and hanging lights.
The dining room at Vestry.
Vestry

Popular

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Inside hotelier Ian Schrager’s Public hotel is Popular, led by chefs Diego Diego Muñoz and John Fraser, where food competes with the property’s buzzy nightlife and fashion scene. Munoz, an alum of the famed Astrid y Gastón, is in charge of the kitchen where he showcases his expertise in Peruvian cuisine. A range of influences, from Incan to Japanese, appear in dishes like duck leg fried rice and a classic lomo saltado, where filet mignon comes with a chile-soy sauce. There’s also a chef’s table available for booking.

An outdoor garden with a long table surrounded by trees.
Popular’s garden is popular brunch.
Popular

Le Crocodile

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The classic French bistro fare — leeks vinaigrette, frisee salads, creme brulee — doesn’t feel outdated here. Neither does the interior design: Instead of smoky antique mirrors and discolored brass railings, the space is filled with natural light, framed by high wooden ceilings, and dotted with tropical plants. It’d be difficult to pin Le Crocodile as a hotel restaurant if it weren’t in the Wythe hotel.

A dining room with high ceiling, blonde wood, round wooden tables, and some plants.
The dining room at Le Crocodile.
Liz Clayman

Laser Wolf

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At chef Michael Solomonov’s recently opened Laser Wolf, there are a few things that are indisputable: the rooftop view of the Manhattan skyline is one of the best in the city and it’s also one of the most difficult reservations in town. Once diners are seated, however, the parade of dishes are also impressive. No matter the order, the complimentary salatim is a stand-out. The spread includes everything from hummus (ask for more pita), plus small bowls of buttery beans, pickles, and chile-spiked cucumbers. It’s an all-around feast that ends on a sweet note with complimentary dessert.

Ten small bowls filled with dips and vegetables and salads are arranged around a larger hummus bowl on a shiny, round metal platter. Pita and fries are off to the right side.
A selection of salatim at Laser Wolf.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Locanda Verde

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Locanda Verde is still a go-to restaurant for Italian, which isn’t a surprise given chef Andrew Carmellini’s track record as the hitmaker behind the popular Bar Primi on the Bowery and the glitzier Carne Mare in the South Street Seaport. The menu includes classic pasta dishes but the lamb meatball sliders and parmigiano-crusted halibut shows the more creative side of the menu.

As You Are

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Downtown Brooklyn isn’t exactly a destination for splashy hotels (and even fewer destination-worthy restaurants), but the Ace’s opening last fall is slowly changing that sleepy reputation. At As You Are, chef Michael King is in charge of the savory side of the menu, and 2018 Eater Young Gun Danny Alvarez oversees desserts. The duo are serving up dishes ranging from celery root latkes to s’mores pavlova for two.

Atop a wooden table, a spread of five plates, including doughnuts, egg tarts, toast, and brown rice porridge.
A spread of dishes from As You Are.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

The Mark Restaurant by Jean-Georges

Jean-Georges Vongerichten's ritzy restaurant inside the Mark Hotel is a splurge. Exhibit A: the black truffle pizza, which makes a great snack at the bar or a starter in the elegant dining room. The menu also includes steaks, light vegetable dishes, and simply prepared proteins. On a weeknight, the bar is filled with locals and sometimes a celebrity or two.

Dowling's at The Carlyle

An ornate dining room decorated with paintings, chandelier, chairs, tables, and big mirror on one wall.
The dining room at Dowling’s.
Alex Staniloff/Dowling’s at the Carlyle

The famed Bemelmans Bar may garner all the attention at the Carlyle, but it’s not the spot for a proper sit-down dinner. The hotel’s restaurant, once simply called the Carlyle, was closed for nearly two years before it reopened in fall 2021 as Dowling’s. The kitchen, under the direction of former 21 Club chef Sylvain Delpique, nods to fine dining in the 1930s and 1940s with dishes like steak Diane and salt-crusted branzino filleted tableside.

An ornate dining room decorated with paintings, chandelier, chairs, tables, and big mirror on one wall.
The dining room at Dowling’s.
Alex Staniloff/Dowling’s at the Carlyle

The Regency Bar & Grill

A dining room with booths and walls with framed photos and light fixtures.
The Regency Bar & Grill is known as a power breakfast scene.
The Regency Bar & Grill

The Loews Regency Hotel isn’t situated in a neighborhood dotted with trendy natural wine bars or restaurants led by big name chefs, but the Regency Bar & Grill located on the first floor is still going strong as the power breakfast stop in town. It’s not uncommon to find black town cars lined up outside in the early mornings as people gather for meetings. For those joining the morning ritual, expect the typical diner fare but with egg dishes around the $30 mark or more.

A dining room with booths and walls with framed photos and light fixtures.
The Regency Bar & Grill is known as a power breakfast scene.
The Regency Bar & Grill

Burger Joint

Burger Joint’s burger
The cheeseburger from the Burger Joint.
Nick Solares/Eater NY

For years, Burger Joint was known as the "hidden" burger stand inside the Le Parker Meridien hotel (which is now the Thompson Central Park). It still draws crowds and is a regular on Eater’s best burgers list. The burgers can also be found in two other locations — Industry City in Brooklyn and the Moynihan food hall at Penn Station — but the Midtown spot is still a favorite.

Burger Joint’s burger
The cheeseburger from the Burger Joint.
Nick Solares/Eater NY

Anything At All

A light-filled dining room with floor to ceiling windows and blue-accented chairs.
The dining room at Anything At All.
Steve Freihon/Graduate Hotel

Even for diehard New Yorkers, Roosevelt Island was a never a destination for eating or drinking. But the opening of the Graduate Hotel last summer included a notable restaurant by restaurateurs Marc Rose and Med Abrous of LA-based hospitality group Call Mom (they opened LA spots like Winsome and Genghis Cohen) and helmed by chef Megan Brown. The menu puts little twists on dishes you’d expect to find at a hotel restaurant: a burger gets the addition of thick-cut pepper bacon and pickled green tomatoes while duck is used instead of chicken for wings.

A light-filled dining room with floor to ceiling windows and blue-accented chairs.
The dining room at Anything At All.
Steve Freihon/Graduate Hotel

Ai Fiori

A white table clothed table with three white bowls of Italian food, including pasta, and a glass of white wine.
A spread of dishes at Ai Fiori.
Louise Palmberg/Altamarea Group

This Italian restaurant at the luxurious Langham hotel has long floated under the radar, even when it was one of chef Michael White’s restaurants. The one-Michelin-starred spot is easier to get into than other, similar kitchens serving fluke crudo or bowls of spaghetti tossed with fresh crab meat. A lounge area to the right of the bar is also a fine place for a casual business meeting or happy hour.

A white table clothed table with three white bowls of Italian food, including pasta, and a glass of white wine.
A spread of dishes at Ai Fiori.
Louise Palmberg/Altamarea Group

Cathédrale

A wide view of a dining room with golden curtains, chandliers, and tables.
The subterranean restaurant Cathédrale at the Moxy East Village.
Cathédrale

The Moxy hotel’s East Village location very much has a clubstaurant vibe — after all, it’s located across from Webster Hall and is operated by Tao Group. But the French-meets-Mediterranean restaurant doesn’t cut corners under chef Jason Hall. Diners can go the luxe route with caviar-topped oysters or bowls of fettuccine showered with black truffles. But there are more simple dishes like burgers, grilled seafood, and chocolate souffle.

A wide view of a dining room with golden curtains, chandliers, and tables.
The subterranean restaurant Cathédrale at the Moxy East Village.
Cathédrale

Vestry

An empty dining room with wide windows, black tables and chairs, and hanging lights.
The dining room at Vestry.
Vestry

Shaun Hergatt’s reputation as a fine dining chef is well documented from his run at NYC restaurants like SHO and Juni (both earned Michelin recognition). At Vestry, which opened during the first year of the pandemic, the accolades have been quieter as pricier dining options took a backseat to takeout and more affordable menus. Still, the seafood- and vegetable-forward cooking with some Japanese influences is leagues better than most hotel restaurant fare.

An empty dining room with wide windows, black tables and chairs, and hanging lights.
The dining room at Vestry.
Vestry

Popular

An outdoor garden with a long table surrounded by trees.
Popular’s garden is popular brunch.
Popular

Inside hotelier Ian Schrager’s Public hotel is Popular, led by chefs Diego Diego Muñoz and John Fraser, where food competes with the property’s buzzy nightlife and fashion scene. Munoz, an alum of the famed Astrid y Gastón, is in charge of the kitchen where he showcases his expertise in Peruvian cuisine. A range of influences, from Incan to Japanese, appear in dishes like duck leg fried rice and a classic lomo saltado, where filet mignon comes with a chile-soy sauce. There’s also a chef’s table available for booking.

An outdoor garden with a long table surrounded by trees.
Popular’s garden is popular brunch.
Popular

Le Crocodile

A dining room with high ceiling, blonde wood, round wooden tables, and some plants.
The dining room at Le Crocodile.
Liz Clayman

The classic French bistro fare — leeks vinaigrette, frisee salads, creme brulee — doesn’t feel outdated here. Neither does the interior design: Instead of smoky antique mirrors and discolored brass railings, the space is filled with natural light, framed by high wooden ceilings, and dotted with tropical plants. It’d be difficult to pin Le Crocodile as a hotel restaurant if it weren’t in the Wythe hotel.

A dining room with high ceiling, blonde wood, round wooden tables, and some plants.
The dining room at Le Crocodile.
Liz Clayman

Laser Wolf

Ten small bowls filled with dips and vegetables and salads are arranged around a larger hummus bowl on a shiny, round metal platter. Pita and fries are off to the right side.
A selection of salatim at Laser Wolf.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

At chef Michael Solomonov’s recently opened Laser Wolf, there are a few things that are indisputable: the rooftop view of the Manhattan skyline is one of the best in the city and it’s also one of the most difficult reservations in town. Once diners are seated, however, the parade of dishes are also impressive. No matter the order, the complimentary salatim is a stand-out. The spread includes everything from hummus (ask for more pita), plus small bowls of buttery beans, pickles, and chile-spiked cucumbers. It’s an all-around feast that ends on a sweet note with complimentary dessert.

Ten small bowls filled with dips and vegetables and salads are arranged around a larger hummus bowl on a shiny, round metal platter. Pita and fries are off to the right side.
A selection of salatim at Laser Wolf.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Locanda Verde

Locanda Verde is still a go-to restaurant for Italian, which isn’t a surprise given chef Andrew Carmellini’s track record as the hitmaker behind the popular Bar Primi on the Bowery and the glitzier Carne Mare in the South Street Seaport. The menu includes classic pasta dishes but the lamb meatball sliders and parmigiano-crusted halibut shows the more creative side of the menu.

As You Are

Atop a wooden table, a spread of five plates, including doughnuts, egg tarts, toast, and brown rice porridge.
A spread of dishes from As You Are.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Downtown Brooklyn isn’t exactly a destination for splashy hotels (and even fewer destination-worthy restaurants), but the Ace’s opening last fall is slowly changing that sleepy reputation. At As You Are, chef Michael King is in charge of the savory side of the menu, and 2018 Eater Young Gun Danny Alvarez oversees desserts. The duo are serving up dishes ranging from celery root latkes to s’mores pavlova for two.

Atop a wooden table, a spread of five plates, including doughnuts, egg tarts, toast, and brown rice porridge.
A spread of dishes from As You Are.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

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