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A hot pot spread at the Dolar Shop full of meats and broths
Hot pot at the Dolar Shop in the East Village
The Dolar Shop [Official]

15 Comforting Hot Pot Restaurants in NYC

Gather your quarantine pod to dip meats and veggies in bubbling vats of broth

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Hot pot at the Dolar Shop in the East Village
| The Dolar Shop [Official]

Hot pot was strictly an indoor activity in New York City before the pandemic hit last year but just like other restaurants striving to stay in business, many restaurants serving the DIY meal figured out a way to bring their pots of broth outdoors or as part of delivery kits. Even through the dead of winter, NYC boasted an assortment of hot pot options including spicy Sichuan, lamb-centric Mongolian, and one new creative Taiwanese spin on the dish.

To facilitate the very nature of hot pot — a serve-yourself operation where meats, vegetables, noodles, and dumplings are cooked at the table — hot pot restaurants have made some serious pandemic-friendly adjustments. They’ve purchased portable gas burners that would heat up the fiery broths outdoors and carefully compartmentalized the to-go packaging for all the different raw ingredients. While indoor dining makes a return, some restaurants have abandoned their outdoor setups. It’s best to check with each individual establishment about hours and whether reservations are being taken for indoor or outdoor dining.

NYC restaurants can now offer indoor dining at 50 percent capacity along with outdoor dining, takeout, and delivery. However, this should not be taken as endorsement for dining out, as there are still safety concerns: for updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the NYC Health Department’s website. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot, Flushing 小肥羊

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136-59 37th Avenue
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 762-8881
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This constantly packed Chinese chain currently has over 35 top-notch locations in the U.S., plus outposts in Canada and Japan. The broth options here are tight: It comes in original or spicy, plus a vegetarian version, and the pot can be split so that everybody at the table can try two soups. But it’s known for the rich, original soup that will be worth sipping. The thin-sliced lamb is the must-get meat, and all the other typical hot pot options like fish balls and enoki mushrooms are available.

2. Spring Shabu-Shabu

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136-20 38th Avenue, 2nd Floor
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 395-8076
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At Spring Shabu-Shabu, housed in the Queens Crossing mall in Flushing, the whole salad bar-like experience is quite clearly mapped out. Start with one of five broths, which are lighter flavor-wise than most hot pot broths; select prepared-to-order proteins to dip, priced by plate; and then hit up the buffet for unlimited vegetables, noodles, dumplings, and other mix-ins. There’s a location in Boston, too.

3. Haidilao Hotpot

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138-23 39th Ave
Queens, NY 11354
(917) 231-8888
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The pandemic hasn’t stopped HaiDiLao from welcoming diners, whether it was for dine-in or takeout. An outdoor tent hosts nearly 40 heated tables that can be reserved beforehand. For the large group hot pot experience — individual hot pots are no longer on offer — guests receive aprons, small ziplock bags for masks, and hair ties. Guests can order up to two broths (down from four pre-pandemic) from a variety of six flavored broths, enjoy complimentary appetizers and desserts including broccoli, spicy beef tripe, green beans, seaweed knots, peanuts, and ice cream. The takeout menu even includes a split bowl for $17.99. HaiDiLao is open from 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. seven days a week.

Hot pot at HaiDiLao
HaiDiLao’s impressive hot pot spread
Stefanie Tuder/Eater

4. Lao Jie Food

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37-98, 37-50 138th St
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 886-2822

The retro-style Laojie Hotpot is still serving up all-you-can-eat hot pot for $22.99 with a complimentary cold milk tea pudding dessert at its heated outdoor dining area made up of six tables. The sauce bar, which is located inside right by the entrance, is self-serve. The individual hot pot option is no longer available, but guests can now order from their new takeout menu, which includes six broths and an extensive offering of vegetables, meats, seafood and noodles — all priced à la carte. Orders of more than $50 come with an extra free broth. The menu also includes all-you-can-eat BBQ ($24.98 for dine-in, $22.98 for 20 pieces for takeout) and barbecue plus hot pot for dine-in only ($28.98). Laojie is taking reservations.

5. Liuyishou Hotpot (Flushing) 刘一手火锅

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136-76 39th Ave
Queens, NY 11354
(347) 732-0201
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The multinational hot pot chain now serves all-you-can-eat hot pot for $29.98 per person, which includes unlimited ice tea, hot tea, desserts, and pre-packaged sauces and spices but excludes the boiling broths. Seven heated tables in a tent at the front can be reserved, and there’s indoor dining as well. A takeout menu features a hot pot combo for two ($65.98) and for four ($129.98), which comes with eight broth flavors (choice of two) as well as meat and vegetable platters, cold jelly desserts, and two sauces.

6. Chong Qing Lao Zao

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This Sichuan-style hot pot restaurant has implemented some serious COVID-safe precautions. Chong Qing Lao Zao’s outdoor seating area, which is located a block away on 39th Avenue and Prince Street, accommodates six heated tables on a first-come, first-served basis. For contactless ordering, guests scan a QR code from their phones. The food is individually wrapped, and plates and utensils are disposable. The waitstaff brings all the sauces to the guests. Takeout is available.

7. Xiang Hotpot

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136-20 Roosevelt Ave #2m
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 521-9999
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The Flushing location of this restaurant is hidden inside the popular New World Mall for spacious outdoor rooftop dining. Twenty five tables, outfitted with disposable plates and utensils, are open to guests on a first-come, first-served basis. The unlimited Sichuan-style hot pot, priced at $39.99 per person, includes seven broth flavors and an amplitude of individually packaged meats, seafood, vegetables, and noodles as well as drinks. The individual hot pot option is no longer offered, but diners can take advantage of a new takeout menu.

8. The Dolar Shop Manhattan

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55 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003
(646) 590-0034
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The East Village outpost of this expanding upscale Chinese hot pot chain from Macau is currently open for indoor dining and takeout only. At-home diners can try the chain’s most popular items including its silver broth, which is made with chicken and pork bone and simmered for 8 hours, as well as Miyazaki beef, wagyu short rib and shrimp pâté.

A hot pot spread at the Dolar Shop full of meats and broths
Dolar Shop
The Dolar Shop [Official]

9. Shabu-Tatsu

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216 E 10th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 477-2972
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Shabu-Tatsu specializes in Japanese shabu shabu and sukiyaki, both of which come with vegetables, rice, salad, and ice cream and a choice of meat like wagyu rib-eye and beef tongue. The outdoor space hosts eight tables with a maximum of six people per table. Guests can make reservations for dine-in time slots to avoid peak wait times that exceed two hours. The new takeout menu includes all dine-in items except the recently launched ishikayi, which requires a special stone for grilling. 

10. 886

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26 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003
(646) 882-0231
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In September, Taiwanese favorite 886 debuted a hot pot version of the classic Taiwanese beef noodle soup. Chef and co-owner Eric Sze considers it a “semi-winter-proof.” Available for on premise dining only, a $50 order serves two people and includes the requisite ingredients plus add-ons such as dry-aged prime ribeye for $16 and wet-aged Brazilian-style ribeye for $10. The restaurant’s outdoor area, which extends over to the next-door piercing shop, accommodates up to 10 tables. 886 does not take reservations.

11. Hometown Hotpot & BBQ

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194 Grand St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 219-8833
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Malaysian-influenced Hometown Hotpot & BBQ is offering all-you-can-eat outdoor dining at its seven tables (five come with heat lamps) and are available on a first-come, first-served basis. The unlimited pot here costs $27.99 per person and includes eight broth flavors (guests can choose up to three) plus as much meat, vegetables, dumplings, and noodles as desired. The hot pot and BBQ combo ($36.99 per person) comes with an ample menu of Korean grilled meats. There is no takeout but indoor and outdoor seating is available.

12. Shabu Shabu Macoron

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61 Delancey St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 925-5220
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Shabu Shabu Macoron, a sister restaurant to Shabu Shabu Mayumon, specializes in upscale, omakase-style Japanese hot pot served with premium A5-grade Miyazaki and Washugyu wagyu steaks. Only one party of up to three guests can be seated at a time in the limited outdoor dining and more recently, the restaurant will now accommodate two groups of up to five guests in one time slot. At-home dinner kits are available. Macoron takes reservations for three 90-minute slots from from 3 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday to Sunday.

Shabushabu Macoron Photo via Shabushabu Macoron/Instagram

13. Da Long Yi Hot Pot

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159 Canal St 2nd floor
New York, NY 10013
(917) 889-5539
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The popular Chengu-style hot pot chain from the Sichuan province accommodates both outdoor dining and takeout. Guests enter a tented area of six heated tables available on a first-come, first-served basis, and make their orders from their phones by scanning a QR code. In addition to its signature “red pot,” a spicy broth made of herbs, chile peppers, and peppercorns that have been fried in beef tallow, the menu has a milder pepper pork and chicken broth.

14. Hou Yi Hot Pot

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92 Hester St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 966-3420
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This Taiwanese hot pot restaurant offers unlimited hot pot indoors and outdoors, and that includes all the soda, juice, ice cream, and self-serve sauces that one can handle. It’s the rare hot pot spot that still offers small, individual pots. The takeout menu excludes hot pot.

Hou Yi Hot Pot Photo via Stephanie L./Yelp

15. 99 Favor Taste

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732 61st St
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 439-0578
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The Brooklyn branch of this typically bustling hot pot chain has built 14 heated cabins that guests can reserve. The unlimited hot pot is still on offer for $23.99, which includes up to three broth flavors and a variety of meats, vegetables, and starches. Due to the pandemic, the individual hot pots are no longer provided, and the waitstaff doles out the sauces at the sauce bar, which has been moved to the entrance of the restaurant. There’s also an assortment of Korean grilled meats, priced at $26.99 and $32.99 for hot pot plus barbecue. Additional locations and takeout options are available in Flushing, East Village, Staten Island, and Chinatown.

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1. Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot, Flushing 小肥羊

136-59 37th Avenue, Flushing, NY 11354

This constantly packed Chinese chain currently has over 35 top-notch locations in the U.S., plus outposts in Canada and Japan. The broth options here are tight: It comes in original or spicy, plus a vegetarian version, and the pot can be split so that everybody at the table can try two soups. But it’s known for the rich, original soup that will be worth sipping. The thin-sliced lamb is the must-get meat, and all the other typical hot pot options like fish balls and enoki mushrooms are available.

136-59 37th Avenue
Flushing, NY 11354

2. Spring Shabu-Shabu

136-20 38th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Flushing, NY 11354

At Spring Shabu-Shabu, housed in the Queens Crossing mall in Flushing, the whole salad bar-like experience is quite clearly mapped out. Start with one of five broths, which are lighter flavor-wise than most hot pot broths; select prepared-to-order proteins to dip, priced by plate; and then hit up the buffet for unlimited vegetables, noodles, dumplings, and other mix-ins. There’s a location in Boston, too.

136-20 38th Avenue, 2nd Floor
Flushing, NY 11354

3. Haidilao Hotpot

138-23 39th Ave, Queens, NY 11354
Hot pot at HaiDiLao
HaiDiLao’s impressive hot pot spread
Stefanie Tuder/Eater

The pandemic hasn’t stopped HaiDiLao from welcoming diners, whether it was for dine-in or takeout. An outdoor tent hosts nearly 40 heated tables that can be reserved beforehand. For the large group hot pot experience — individual hot pots are no longer on offer — guests receive aprons, small ziplock bags for masks, and hair ties. Guests can order up to two broths (down from four pre-pandemic) from a variety of six flavored broths, enjoy complimentary appetizers and desserts including broccoli, spicy beef tripe, green beans, seaweed knots, peanuts, and ice cream. The takeout menu even includes a split bowl for $17.99. HaiDiLao is open from 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. seven days a week.

138-23 39th Ave
Queens, NY 11354

4. Lao Jie Food

37-98, 37-50 138th St, Flushing, NY 11354

The retro-style Laojie Hotpot is still serving up all-you-can-eat hot pot for $22.99 with a complimentary cold milk tea pudding dessert at its heated outdoor dining area made up of six tables. The sauce bar, which is located inside right by the entrance, is self-serve. The individual hot pot option is no longer available, but guests can now order from their new takeout menu, which includes six broths and an extensive offering of vegetables, meats, seafood and noodles — all priced à la carte. Orders of more than $50 come with an extra free broth. The menu also includes all-you-can-eat BBQ ($24.98 for dine-in, $22.98 for 20 pieces for takeout) and barbecue plus hot pot for dine-in only ($28.98). Laojie is taking reservations.

37-98, 37-50 138th St
Flushing, NY 11354

5. Liuyishou Hotpot (Flushing) 刘一手火锅

136-76 39th Ave, Queens, NY 11354

The multinational hot pot chain now serves all-you-can-eat hot pot for $29.98 per person, which includes unlimited ice tea, hot tea, desserts, and pre-packaged sauces and spices but excludes the boiling broths. Seven heated tables in a tent at the front can be reserved, and there’s indoor dining as well. A takeout menu features a hot pot combo for two ($65.98) and for four ($129.98), which comes with eight broth flavors (choice of two) as well as meat and vegetable platters, cold jelly desserts, and two sauces.

136-76 39th Ave
Queens, NY 11354

6. Chong Qing Lao Zao

Flushing, NY 11354

This Sichuan-style hot pot restaurant has implemented some serious COVID-safe precautions. Chong Qing Lao Zao’s outdoor seating area, which is located a block away on 39th Avenue and Prince Street, accommodates six heated tables on a first-come, first-served basis. For contactless ordering, guests scan a QR code from their phones. The food is individually wrapped, and plates and utensils are disposable. The waitstaff brings all the sauces to the guests. Takeout is available.

7. Xiang Hotpot

136-20 Roosevelt Ave #2m, Flushing, NY 11354

The Flushing location of this restaurant is hidden inside the popular New World Mall for spacious outdoor rooftop dining. Twenty five tables, outfitted with disposable plates and utensils, are open to guests on a first-come, first-served basis. The unlimited Sichuan-style hot pot, priced at $39.99 per person, includes seven broth flavors and an amplitude of individually packaged meats, seafood, vegetables, and noodles as well as drinks. The individual hot pot option is no longer offered, but diners can take advantage of a new takeout menu.

136-20 Roosevelt Ave #2m
Flushing, NY 11354

8. The Dolar Shop Manhattan

55 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10003
A hot pot spread at the Dolar Shop full of meats and broths
Dolar Shop
The Dolar Shop [Official]

The East Village outpost of this expanding upscale Chinese hot pot chain from Macau is currently open for indoor dining and takeout only. At-home diners can try the chain’s most popular items including its silver broth, which is made with chicken and pork bone and simmered for 8 hours, as well as Miyazaki beef, wagyu short rib and shrimp pâté.

55 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003

9. Shabu-Tatsu

216 E 10th St, New York, NY 10003

Shabu-Tatsu specializes in Japanese shabu shabu and sukiyaki, both of which come with vegetables, rice, salad, and ice cream and a choice of meat like wagyu rib-eye and beef tongue. The outdoor space hosts eight tables with a maximum of six people per table. Guests can make reservations for dine-in time slots to avoid peak wait times that exceed two hours. The new takeout menu includes all dine-in items except the recently launched ishikayi, which requires a special stone for grilling. 

216 E 10th St
New York, NY 10003

10. 886

26 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003

In September, Taiwanese favorite 886 debuted a hot pot version of the classic Taiwanese beef noodle soup. Chef and co-owner Eric Sze considers it a “semi-winter-proof.” Available for on premise dining only, a $50 order serves two people and includes the requisite ingredients plus add-ons such as dry-aged prime ribeye for $16 and wet-aged Brazilian-style ribeye for $10. The restaurant’s outdoor area, which extends over to the next-door piercing shop, accommodates up to 10 tables. 886 does not take reservations.

26 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003

11. Hometown Hotpot & BBQ

194 Grand St, New York, NY 10013

Malaysian-influenced Hometown Hotpot & BBQ is offering all-you-can-eat outdoor dining at its seven tables (five come with heat lamps) and are available on a first-come, first-served basis. The unlimited pot here costs $27.99 per person and includes eight broth flavors (guests can choose up to three) plus as much meat, vegetables, dumplings, and noodles as desired. The hot pot and BBQ combo ($36.99 per person) comes with an ample menu of Korean grilled meats. There is no takeout but indoor and outdoor seating is available.

194 Grand St
New York, NY 10013

12. Shabu Shabu Macoron

61 Delancey St, New York, NY 10002
Shabushabu Macoron Photo via Shabushabu Macoron/Instagram

Shabu Shabu Macoron, a sister restaurant to Shabu Shabu Mayumon, specializes in upscale, omakase-style Japanese hot pot served with premium A5-grade Miyazaki and Washugyu wagyu steaks. Only one party of up to three guests can be seated at a time in the limited outdoor dining and more recently, the restaurant will now accommodate two groups of up to five guests in one time slot. At-home dinner kits are available. Macoron takes reservations for three 90-minute slots from from 3 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday to Sunday.

61 Delancey St
New York, NY 10002

13. Da Long Yi Hot Pot

159 Canal St 2nd floor, New York, NY 10013

The popular Chengu-style hot pot chain from the Sichuan province accommodates both outdoor dining and takeout. Guests enter a tented area of six heated tables available on a first-come, first-served basis, and make their orders from their phones by scanning a QR code. In addition to its signature “red pot,” a spicy broth made of herbs, chile peppers, and peppercorns that have been fried in beef tallow, the menu has a milder pepper pork and chicken broth.

159 Canal St 2nd floor
New York, NY 10013

14. Hou Yi Hot Pot

92 Hester St, New York, NY 10002
Hou Yi Hot Pot Photo via Stephanie L./Yelp

This Taiwanese hot pot restaurant offers unlimited hot pot indoors and outdoors, and that includes all the soda, juice, ice cream, and self-serve sauces that one can handle. It’s the rare hot pot spot that still offers small, individual pots. The takeout menu excludes hot pot.

92 Hester St
New York, NY 10002

15. 99 Favor Taste

732 61st St, Brooklyn, NY 11220

The Brooklyn branch of this typically bustling hot pot chain has built 14 heated cabins that guests can reserve. The unlimited hot pot is still on offer for $23.99, which includes up to three broth flavors and a variety of meats, vegetables, and starches. Due to the pandemic, the individual hot pots are no longer provided, and the waitstaff doles out the sauces at the sauce bar, which has been moved to the entrance of the restaurant. There’s also an assortment of Korean grilled meats, priced at $26.99 and $32.99 for hot pot plus barbecue. Additional locations and takeout options are available in Flushing, East Village, Staten Island, and Chinatown.

732 61st St
Brooklyn, NY 11220

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