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A hot pot spread at the Dolar Shop full of meats and broths.
Hot pot at the Dolar Shop in the East Village.
The Dolar Shop

18 Cozy, Comforting Hot Pot Restaurants in NYC

Dip meats and veggies in bubbling vats of broth to keep warm all winter long

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Hot pot at the Dolar Shop in the East Village.
| The Dolar Shop

New York City’s hot pot restaurants are finally back to being a mostly indoor activity. Just like other restaurants striving to stay in business the past two years, many hot pot establishments got creative at the height of the pandemic. They introduced portable gas burners, outdoor tents, and even carefully compartmentalized takeout packaging. But as regulations waned, more New Yorkers are back in dining rooms where they can dip their meats, vegetables, noodles, and dumplings into bubbling broths far from the cold and wind.

This winter, NYC boasts an assortment of hot pot options including mouth-numbingly spicy Sichuan, lamb-centric Mongolian, wagyu-focused Japanese, and a loaded spicy Korean one in Woodside where a whole lobster is the centerpiece.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. 99 Favor Taste

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732 61st St
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 439-0578
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99 Favor Taste is one of the main go-to spots for hot pot in Sunset Park and one of the more famous ones in NYC overall – with four locations in the Lower East Side, Flushing, Staten Island, and Brooklyn. Its appeal doesn’t lie just in its offering of unlimited vats of bubbling broths, but also because diners can combine all-you-can-eat hot pot and Korean barbecue. Original pig bone broth is the most popular, but opt for the kimchi broth with rice cakes to try something different. 99 Favor Taste checks off all the standard elements of hot pot: an abundance of sauces, meats and vegetables that can be dipped into a duo or trio of broths. Head here for a free hot pot meal on your birthday or within three days of it.

2. Hometown Hotpot & BBQ

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194 Grand St
New York, NY 10013
(212) 219-8833
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Hometown Hot Pot and 99 Favor Taste are the big-name destinations for all-you-can-eat hot pot that can be combined with unlimited barbecue. But at Hometown, Malaysian influences come through in the curry and tom yum broths and its assortment of stuffed specials like okra, tofu, and lotus root. There’s an extensive variety of meats, veggies, and a sauce bar on each of the two floors. Bring your ID for a complimentary birthday meal.  

3. Da Long Yi Hot Pot

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159 Canal St 2nd floor
New York, NY 10013
(917) 889-5539
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This globetrotting hot pot chain has come a long way since opening up shop in Chengdu, the capital city of China’s Szechuan province, and touching down in Manhattan’s Chinatown in 2019. It’s easy to rack up a bill with the a la carte pricing for an extensive array of fixings here, but fans stand by its signature red pot, a spicy broth made of herbs, chile peppers, and peppercorns that have been fried in beef tallow and served with butter, as tradition calls for here. It’s a welcome oasis for those with a formidable spice tolerance. Make a reservation, scan a QR code to order, and bring your ID for a free birthday hot pot.

4. Hou Yi Hot Pot

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92 Hester St
New York, NY 10002
(212) 966-3420
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This no-frills Taiwanese restaurant offers all-you-can-eat hot pot, that at $39 is a bit pricier than others, but makes up for it with unlimited drinks and ice cream that’ll come in handy if the spicy broth is too much to handle.

Hou Yi Hot Pot Photo via Stephanie L./Yelp

5. Shabushabu Mayumon

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115 Division St
New York, NY 10002
(646) 476-7717
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Shabu Shabu Mayumon stands out for its upscale, Japanese–style hot pot omakase complete with premium A5-grade Miyazaki and Washugyu wagyu steak. The philosophy here is to maximize umami. The dashi broth and karajiru dipping sauce are made with seaweed imported from Hakodate, Hokkaido, for its high glutamate (i.e. umami) concentration. According to its website, the inosinate acid in the beef has “an amazing synergy” with glutamate, which compounds the umami “exponentially.” Make a reservation for a luxurious experience at the eight-seat counter.

26 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003
(646) 882-0231
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In 2020, Taiwanese favorite 886 debuted a hot pot version of the classic Taiwanese beef noodle soup. Chef and co-owner Eric Sze considers it “semi-winter-proof.” The $50 order serves two people and includes the requisite ingredients like the braised beef shank and mung bean glass noodles plus add-ons such as dry-aged prime ribeye for $16 and wet-aged Brazilian-style ribeye for $10.

7. The Dolar Shop Manhattan

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55 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003
(646) 590-0034
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For an upscale experience in a spacious setting with attentive staff, head to the Macau-based Dolar Shop’s East Village location. Guests can store their belongings in sliding cubbies before ordering on iPads. Unlike other places, the personal hot pot – covered with a protective porcelain – can be divided for two broths. Make those the peppery, creamy “silver broth” made with chicken and pork bone and simmered for eight hours, and the light, herbal black truffle broth. The wagyu short rib, shrimp pate, scallop, and flounder are also highlights. Reservations are a necessity for those who want to avoid waiting. 

A hot pot spread at the Dolar Shop full of meats and broths.
Dolar Shop
The Dolar Shop [Official]

8. Kimura

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31 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003
(212) 598-1188
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Since 1985, this St. Marks Place gem has specialized in traditional Japanese hot pot. There’s nabe, where the assorted meats and vegetables are thrown into the hot pot all at once unlike shabu shabu (thinly-sliced meats are essentially parboiled with a quick swish in the broth) and sukiyaki (all ingredients are stewed longer in a sweet and savory broth). Kimura serves heaping portions of all three types with fixed ingredients and there are options for add-ins like wagyu beef slices. The $23 collagen nabe (pig trotters, chicken, leek, tofu, dry garlic) and $21 kurobuta pork belly nabe (Japanese Kurobuta pork belly, cabbage, soy sprouts, chili, chive, burdock) are hits. Ramune soda and Japanese whisky cocktails round out the menu. There’s an outdoor heated booth at the back of the restaurant. Reserve a table ahead to avoid hours-long lines.

A pot filled with pork, chives, and tofu for Japanese hot pot on an individual gas burner with a side of rice and veggies.
Japanese hot pot at Kimura.
Kimura

9. Shabu-Tatsu

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216 E 10th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 477-2972
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Shabu-Tatsu specializes in Japanese shabu shabu and sukiyaki, and the detail-oriented staff will make sure diners do right by each. For shabu shabu, thinly-sliced meats – grade A5 wagyu beef and prime rib eye beef – and vegetables are briefly stirred in boiling water then dipped in ponzu or sesame sauce. In the sukiyaki course, all the ingredients are slowly simmered together in a sweet sauce then dipped in a raw egg. Meals are finished off with complimentary red bean and green tea ice cream.

10. Sik Gaek

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49-11 Roosevelt Ave
Woodside, NY 11377
(718) 205-4555
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One of the few remaining restaurants from when a Korean community thrived in Woodside is home to Sik Gaek’s Empire Spicy Seafood hot pot — a mountain of snow crab, blue crab, abalone, clams, mussels, shrimp, squid, and baby octopus capped with a fire engine-red lobster as the centerpiece. Udon noodles, enoki mushrooms, and watercress fight for space in the spicy broth. The $99 hot pot is ideal for sharing among friends in a room with casual tavern vibes and Korean hiphop. The outdoor set-up is styled with wooden slatted partitions wrapping around each table, and Korean menu items are painted onto wooden slats and blocks that hang from the makeshift wall.

A hot pot filled with seafood including lobster, clams, mussels, shrimp, fish cake, and enoki mushrooms.
The Empire Spicy Seafood hot pot at Sik Gaek.
Sik Gaek

11. Jaew Hon

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7130 Roosevelt Ave 2nd floor
Queens, NY 11372
(347) 935-3085
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In a sea of Sichuan pepper broths and herbal soups, Jaew Hon is the rare Thai-style all-you-can-eat hot pot where diners can fill their pots with favorite Thai soups like tom yum and yentafo. The tom zap (lemongrass, galangal, lime leaf, shallot, heavy on the herbs) and jaew hon (shallot, basil, beef or pork blood) broths make up the spicy options. For those who miss the DIY flavors at Chinese hot pot places, Jaew Hon offers three sauces: spicy, less spicy, and savory with bean curd. Despite the Thai influence, there are all the standard fixings like beef slices, fish balls, and noodles included in the $30 all-you-can-eat meal (there is a 90-minute limit). Don’t skip out on the garlic fried rice, either. This spot is tiny and inconspicuous; it sits atop Playground, the restaurant on the ground floor. Bring cash and walk in; the restaurant doesn’t take reservations.

12. Lao Jie Food

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37-98, 37-50 138th St
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 886-2822

Despite a company shuffle – a closing of the Flushing location and an opening in Bensonhurst while the Sunset Park location stayed standing – the retro-style Lao Jie Hot Pot is still serving up all-you-can-eat hot pot for $27. A duo of bone broth and spicy broth is the move here, although individual pots are also an option. A huge selection of add-ins include fried tofu rolls, pork belly, roe-stuffed fish balls, and chrysanthemum leaves. Bring ID on your birthday for a free meal. Call for reservations.

13. Xiang Hotpot

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136-20 Roosevelt Ave #2m
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 521-9999
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The Flushing location of this restaurant is hidden inside the popular New World Mall, and it sports tiered lanterns and greenery running through the zen-like interior. The “spicy bear” broth – a Sichuan pepper-based broth bobbing with an edible bear sculpture made out of butter – and the tomato broth are popular. The shrimp paste and shrimp dumplings have also garnered rave reviews here. The pandemic put an end to the all-you-can-eat option, but diners can opt for a membership, where a gift card essentially works as a debit card with each order reduced by one dollar. Xiang also has a Borough Park, Brooklyn, outpost (and new locations coming soon to Los Angeles and Houston).

14. Chong Qing Lao Zao

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This local favorite specializes in Chong Qing-style hot pot with Sichuan peppers and fatty beef tallow, but all the broths in general have fans who slurp them down like soups. If a broth is too spicy, the attentive staff shares recommendations on dipping sauce combos and brown sugar jellies to calm the burn. Make a reservation to avoid the two-hour wait time, especially on weekends.

15. Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot, Flushing 小肥羊

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136-59 37th Avenue
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 762-8881
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This constantly packed Chinese chain, formerly named Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot, has over 35 top-notch locations in the U.S., plus outposts in Canada and Japan. The broth options here are limited: It comes in original or spicy, plus a vegetarian version, and the pot can be split so that everybody at the table can try two soups. But the establishment is known for its rich, original soup that will be worth sipping. The thin-sliced lamb is the must-get meat, and all the other typical hot pot options like fish balls and enoki mushrooms are available. The all-you-can-eat option – $30 for 90 minutes – applies solely to meat, and only Monday through Friday from 12 to 9:30 p.m.

16. Haidilao Hotpot

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138-23 39th Ave
Queens, NY 11354
(917) 231-8888
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If any hot pot restaurant goes the extra mile in service, that would be Haidilao. The globe-trotting Chinese chain – 500 outposts in 13 countries – provides its guests with aprons, small ziplock bags for masks, disposable toothbrushes with toothpaste in a squeaky clean bathroom, and an order of pulled noodles comes with a dance performance. Bells and whistles aside, guests swear by the six flavored broths – up to four can be ordered in a pot – and there’s an abundance of fixings like premium wagyu meats and fresh shellfish and complimentary sides like spicy beef tripe, green beans, seaweed knots, and ice cream. Lines can get long, so make a reservation or sit tight in the waiting room area with board games, free snacks, and drinks.

Hot pot at HaiDiLao
HaiDiLao’s impressive hot pot spread
Stefanie Tuder/Eater

17. Liuyishou Hotpot (Flushing) 刘一手火锅

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136-76 39th Ave
Queens, NY 11354
(347) 732-0201
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This hot pot chain grew from a small street in Chongqing to 1,200 outposts across the world,  including a Flushing restaurant that serves all-you-can-eat hot pot for $30 per person. Drinks, desserts, and an extensive sauce bar are included, but any of the 11 broths – including the powerfully spicy original Sichuan broth and a milder coconut chicken broth – will cost extra.

18. Lao Shen Hot Pot

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160-34 Northern Blvd
Queens, NY 11358
(917) 908-0898
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Skip the lines, crowds, and premium prices at the hot pot spots concentrated in downtown Flushing and head over to the neighborhood’s outskirts to Lao Shen. In 2020, it took over the spacious Prince Lounge and outfitted each table on two floors with pandemic-friendly individual hot pot stations, which attentive staffers refill with soup (not water). The Chongqing sour radish and duck broth is unrivaled in the city’s hot pot offering, and the spicy Sichuan broth is meant for the mighty. The all-you-can-eat option runs $33 for two hours.

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1. 99 Favor Taste

732 61st St, Brooklyn, NY 11220

99 Favor Taste is one of the main go-to spots for hot pot in Sunset Park and one of the more famous ones in NYC overall – with four locations in the Lower East Side, Flushing, Staten Island, and Brooklyn. Its appeal doesn’t lie just in its offering of unlimited vats of bubbling broths, but also because diners can combine all-you-can-eat hot pot and Korean barbecue. Original pig bone broth is the most popular, but opt for the kimchi broth with rice cakes to try something different. 99 Favor Taste checks off all the standard elements of hot pot: an abundance of sauces, meats and vegetables that can be dipped into a duo or trio of broths. Head here for a free hot pot meal on your birthday or within three days of it.

732 61st St
Brooklyn, NY 11220

2. Hometown Hotpot & BBQ

194 Grand St, New York, NY 10013

Hometown Hot Pot and 99 Favor Taste are the big-name destinations for all-you-can-eat hot pot that can be combined with unlimited barbecue. But at Hometown, Malaysian influences come through in the curry and tom yum broths and its assortment of stuffed specials like okra, tofu, and lotus root. There’s an extensive variety of meats, veggies, and a sauce bar on each of the two floors. Bring your ID for a complimentary birthday meal.  

194 Grand St
New York, NY 10013

3. Da Long Yi Hot Pot

159 Canal St 2nd floor, New York, NY 10013

This globetrotting hot pot chain has come a long way since opening up shop in Chengdu, the capital city of China’s Szechuan province, and touching down in Manhattan’s Chinatown in 2019. It’s easy to rack up a bill with the a la carte pricing for an extensive array of fixings here, but fans stand by its signature red pot, a spicy broth made of herbs, chile peppers, and peppercorns that have been fried in beef tallow and served with butter, as tradition calls for here. It’s a welcome oasis for those with a formidable spice tolerance. Make a reservation, scan a QR code to order, and bring your ID for a free birthday hot pot.

159 Canal St 2nd floor
New York, NY 10013

4. Hou Yi Hot Pot

92 Hester St, New York, NY 10002
Hou Yi Hot Pot Photo via Stephanie L./Yelp

This no-frills Taiwanese restaurant offers all-you-can-eat hot pot, that at $39 is a bit pricier than others, but makes up for it with unlimited drinks and ice cream that’ll come in handy if the spicy broth is too much to handle.

92 Hester St
New York, NY 10002

5. Shabushabu Mayumon

115 Division St, New York, NY 10002

Shabu Shabu Mayumon stands out for its upscale, Japanese–style hot pot omakase complete with premium A5-grade Miyazaki and Washugyu wagyu steak. The philosophy here is to maximize umami. The dashi broth and karajiru dipping sauce are made with seaweed imported from Hakodate, Hokkaido, for its high glutamate (i.e. umami) concentration. According to its website, the inosinate acid in the beef has “an amazing synergy” with glutamate, which compounds the umami “exponentially.” Make a reservation for a luxurious experience at the eight-seat counter.

115 Division St
New York, NY 10002

6. 886

26 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003

In 2020, Taiwanese favorite 886 debuted a hot pot version of the classic Taiwanese beef noodle soup. Chef and co-owner Eric Sze considers it “semi-winter-proof.” The $50 order serves two people and includes the requisite ingredients like the braised beef shank and mung bean glass noodles plus add-ons such as dry-aged prime ribeye for $16 and wet-aged Brazilian-style ribeye for $10.

26 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003

7. The Dolar Shop Manhattan

55 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10003
A hot pot spread at the Dolar Shop full of meats and broths.
Dolar Shop
The Dolar Shop [Official]

For an upscale experience in a spacious setting with attentive staff, head to the Macau-based Dolar Shop’s East Village location. Guests can store their belongings in sliding cubbies before ordering on iPads. Unlike other places, the personal hot pot – covered with a protective porcelain – can be divided for two broths. Make those the peppery, creamy “silver broth” made with chicken and pork bone and simmered for eight hours, and the light, herbal black truffle broth. The wagyu short rib, shrimp pate, scallop, and flounder are also highlights. Reservations are a necessity for those who want to avoid waiting. 

55 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003

8. Kimura

31 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003
A pot filled with pork, chives, and tofu for Japanese hot pot on an individual gas burner with a side of rice and veggies.
Japanese hot pot at Kimura.
Kimura

Since 1985, this St. Marks Place gem has specialized in traditional Japanese hot pot. There’s nabe, where the assorted meats and vegetables are thrown into the hot pot all at once unlike shabu shabu (thinly-sliced meats are essentially parboiled with a quick swish in the broth) and sukiyaki (all ingredients are stewed longer in a sweet and savory broth). Kimura serves heaping portions of all three types with fixed ingredients and there are options for add-ins like wagyu beef slices. The $23 collagen nabe (pig trotters, chicken, leek, tofu, dry garlic) and $21 kurobuta pork belly nabe (Japanese Kurobuta pork belly, cabbage, soy sprouts, chili, chive, burdock) are hits. Ramune soda and Japanese whisky cocktails round out the menu. There’s an outdoor heated booth at the back of the restaurant. Reserve a table ahead to avoid hours-long lines.

31 St Marks Pl
New York, NY 10003

9. Shabu-Tatsu

216 E 10th St, New York, NY 10003

Shabu-Tatsu specializes in Japanese shabu shabu and sukiyaki, and the detail-oriented staff will make sure diners do right by each. For shabu shabu, thinly-sliced meats – grade A5 wagyu beef and prime rib eye beef – and vegetables are briefly stirred in boiling water then dipped in ponzu or sesame sauce. In the sukiyaki course, all the ingredients are slowly simmered together in a sweet sauce then dipped in a raw egg. Meals are finished off with complimentary red bean and green tea ice cream.

216 E 10th St
New York, NY 10003

10. Sik Gaek

49-11 Roosevelt Ave, Woodside, NY 11377
A hot pot filled with seafood including lobster, clams, mussels, shrimp, fish cake, and enoki mushrooms.
The Empire Spicy Seafood hot pot at Sik Gaek.
Sik Gaek

One of the few remaining restaurants from when a Korean community thrived in Woodside is home to Sik Gaek’s Empire Spicy Seafood hot pot — a mountain of snow crab, blue crab, abalone, clams, mussels, shrimp, squid, and baby octopus capped with a fire engine-red lobster as the centerpiece. Udon noodles, enoki mushrooms, and watercress fight for space in the spicy broth. The $99 hot pot is ideal for sharing among friends in a room with casual tavern vibes and Korean hiphop. The outdoor set-up is styled with wooden slatted partitions wrapping around each table, and Korean menu items are painted onto wooden slats and blocks that hang from the makeshift wall.

49-11 Roosevelt Ave
Woodside, NY 11377

11. Jaew Hon

7130 Roosevelt Ave 2nd floor, Queens, NY 11372

In a sea of Sichuan pepper broths and herbal soups, Jaew Hon is the rare Thai-style all-you-can-eat hot pot where diners can fill their pots with favorite Thai soups like tom yum and yentafo. The tom zap (lemongrass, galangal, lime leaf, shallot, heavy on the herbs) and jaew hon (shallot, basil, beef or pork blood) broths make up the spicy options. For those who miss the DIY flavors at Chinese hot pot places, Jaew Hon offers three sauces: spicy, less spicy, and savory with bean curd. Despite the Thai influence, there are all the standard fixings like beef slices, fish balls, and noodles included in the $30 all-you-can-eat meal (there is a 90-minute limit). Don’t skip out on the garlic fried rice, either. This spot is tiny and inconspicuous; it sits atop Playground, the restaurant on the ground floor. Bring cash and walk in; the restaurant doesn’t take reservations.

7130 Roosevelt Ave 2nd floor
Queens, NY 11372

12. Lao Jie Food

37-98, 37-50 138th St, Flushing, NY 11354

Despite a company shuffle – a closing of the Flushing location and an opening in Bensonhurst while the Sunset Park location stayed standing – the retro-style Lao Jie Hot Pot is still serving up all-you-can-eat hot pot for $27. A duo of bone broth and spicy broth is the move here, although individual pots are also an option. A huge selection of add-ins include fried tofu rolls, pork belly, roe-stuffed fish balls, and chrysanthemum leaves. Bring ID on your birthday for a free meal. Call for reservations.

37-98, 37-50 138th St
Flushing, NY 11354

13. Xiang Hotpot

136-20 Roosevelt Ave #2m, Flushing, NY 11354

The Flushing location of this restaurant is hidden inside the popular New World Mall, and it sports tiered lanterns and greenery running through the zen-like interior. The “spicy bear” broth – a Sichuan pepper-based broth bobbing with an edible bear sculpture made out of butter – and the tomato broth are popular. The shrimp paste and shrimp dumplings have also garnered rave reviews here. The pandemic put an end to the all-you-can-eat option, but diners can opt for a membership, where a gift card essentially works as a debit card with each order reduced by one dollar. Xiang also has a Borough Park, Brooklyn, outpost (and new locations coming soon to Los Angeles and Houston).

136-20 Roosevelt Ave #2m
Flushing, NY 11354

14. Chong Qing Lao Zao

Flushing, NY 11354

This local favorite specializes in Chong Qing-style hot pot with Sichuan peppers and fatty beef tallow, but all the broths in general have fans who slurp them down like soups. If a broth is too spicy, the attentive staff shares recommendations on dipping sauce combos and brown sugar jellies to calm the burn. Make a reservation to avoid the two-hour wait time, especially on weekends.

15. Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot, Flushing 小肥羊

136-59 37th Avenue, Flushing, NY 11354

This constantly packed Chinese chain, formerly named Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot, has over 35 top-notch locations in the U.S., plus outposts in Canada and Japan. The broth options here are limited: It comes in original or spicy, plus a vegetarian version, and the pot can be split so that everybody at the table can try two soups. But the establishment is known for its rich, original soup that will be worth sipping. The thin-sliced lamb is the must-get meat, and all the other typical hot pot options like fish balls and enoki mushrooms are available. The all-you-can-eat option – $30 for 90 minutes – applies solely to meat, and only Monday through Friday from 12 to 9:30 p.m.

136-59 37th Avenue
Flushing, NY 11354

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16. Haidilao Hotpot

138-23 39th Ave, Queens, NY 11354
Hot pot at HaiDiLao
HaiDiLao’s impressive hot pot spread
Stefanie Tuder/Eater

If any hot pot restaurant goes the extra mile in service, that would be Haidilao. The globe-trotting Chinese chain – 500 outposts in 13 countries – provides its guests with aprons, small ziplock bags for masks, disposable toothbrushes with toothpaste in a squeaky clean bathroom, and an order of pulled noodles comes with a dance performance. Bells and whistles aside, guests swear by the six flavored broths – up to four can be ordered in a pot – and there’s an abundance of fixings like premium wagyu meats and fresh shellfish and complimentary sides like spicy beef tripe, green beans, seaweed knots, and ice cream. Lines can get long, so make a reservation or sit tight in the waiting room area with board games, free snacks, and drinks.

138-23 39th Ave
Queens, NY 11354

17. Liuyishou Hotpot (Flushing) 刘一手火锅

136-76 39th Ave, Queens, NY 11354

This hot pot chain grew from a small street in Chongqing to 1,200 outposts across the world,  including a Flushing restaurant that serves all-you-can-eat hot pot for $30 per person. Drinks, desserts, and an extensive sauce bar are included, but any of the 11 broths – including the powerfully spicy original Sichuan broth and a milder coconut chicken broth – will cost extra.

136-76 39th Ave
Queens, NY 11354

18. Lao Shen Hot Pot

160-34 Northern Blvd, Queens, NY 11358

Skip the lines, crowds, and premium prices at the hot pot spots concentrated in downtown Flushing and head over to the neighborhood’s outskirts to Lao Shen. In 2020, it took over the spacious Prince Lounge and outfitted each table on two floors with pandemic-friendly individual hot pot stations, which attentive staffers refill with soup (not water). The Chongqing sour radish and duck broth is unrivaled in the city’s hot pot offering, and the spicy Sichuan broth is meant for the mighty. The all-you-can-eat option runs $33 for two hours.

160-34 Northern Blvd
Queens, NY 11358

Related Maps