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A half-dozen customers lounge in the backyard of a Brooklyn bar decorated with hanging market lights and outdoor furniture.
The heated backyard at Maison Yaki in Prospect Heights.
Maison Yaki

22 NYC Restaurants Offering Cozy, Heated Outdoor Dining

Restaurants are once again heating their backyard setups and outdoor dining structures

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The heated backyard at Maison Yaki in Prospect Heights.
| Maison Yaki

Restaurants and bars are once again breaking out their electric and natural gas heaters, as temperatures drop and cases of the omicron variant continue to rise citywide. Some, like Dr. Clark in Chinatown and Cote in the Flatiron District, have outfitted their setups with heated tables, while others — Baar Baar in the East Village, Wu’s Wonton King in Chinatown, and others — are using the overhead electric heaters that warmed their structures last winter. As temperatures drop, this list of restaurants offering heated outdoor dining will be updated regularly. If there’s an outdoor setup in your neighborhood that we missed, let us know at tips@eater.com.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Harlem Shake

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This uptown restaurant known for its smash burgers offers heated seating at a partially enclosed dining structure out front. A second location of Harlem Shake, which recently opened at 119 Fifth Avenue in Brooklyn’s Park Slope, also offers heated outdoor seating.

Three hot dogs in buns sit side by side atop a green and white checker board paper on a blue tray
No matter the weather you can enjoy the retro menu at both Harlem Shake locations.
Harlem Shake

LoLo's Seafood Shack

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Harlem seafood destination LoLo’s Seafood Shack has built out a colorful heated cabana in its backyard, where diners can dig into its popular seafood boils, served out of plastic bags, and baskets of fried fish.

Lolo’s Seafood Shack
The exterior of LoLo’s Seafood Shack.
Lolo’s Seafood Shack

Old John's Diner

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Upper West Side institution Old John’s Luncheonette was resurrected last year as Old John’s Diner with expanded indoor seating and an updated menu. Outside, diners can order the same menu of egg creams and banana splits from one of five private dining structures, outfitted with electric heaters and capable of seating two to four people each.

A series of private outdoor dining rooms at Upper West Side restaurant Old John’s Diner.
The outdoor dining structures at Old John’s Diner.
Old John’s Diner

Cote Korean Steakhouse

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Velvet curtains keep the heat in and make for stylish outdoor digs at the Michelin-starred Cote. The Korean steakhouse has constructed a series of private outdoor dining rooms with electric table heaters. They can seat up to six people each.

Wine glasses and hands holding chopsticks pose at a meal that features raw slabs of beef.
A meal in one of Cote’s outdoor dining rooms.
Andre Mathur/Cote Korean Steakhouse

Mudspot

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East Village mainstay Mudspot has always had an enclosed, outdoor area in its backyard. But during the pandemic, the popular coffee shop and brunch spot installed a new, open air heated structure in front of the establishment, with mod-looking floral fabric panels separating each seating area. Here, you can get all the warming notes of Mud’s signature hot chai, while cozying up under one of the heaters. The tables are all picnic-style, which makes it a rare outdoor option that’s great for group hangs.

Ho Foods

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Ho Foods is a restaurant with small footprint and menu that nevertheless manages to pack in a ton of flavor. But thanks to its outdoor heated structure, you can enjoy one of its Taiwanese soups — considered to be one of the best bowls of soups in the city — while stretching out a bit more.

Beef noodles soup, with noodles artfully wrapped around chopsticks, from Ho Foods
The crowd-favorite beef noodle soup at Ho Foods.
Dan Ahn/Ho Foods

Cadence

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From this snug, alley-like restaurant, chef Shenarri Freeman is serving a head-turning array of vegan soul foods, including fried lasagna and pancakes with black-eyed peas. Indoors, those dishes and plenty others are passed over a chef’s counter to diners, but grab a seat at one of its heated outdoor tables for a meal with a little more leg room.

Two hunks of deep-fried lasagna are arranged in a white bowl on a marble countertop.
Vegan deep-fried lasagna at Cadence.
Eric Medsker/Cadence

Baar Baar

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Garlands of flowers and market lights hang from Baar Baar’s outdoor structure, which is protected from rain and outfitted with overhead heaters for the colder months. The East Village gastropub with a separate vegan menu specializes in modern Indian fare, like sweet potato chaat and pork belly prepared in a tandoor oven.

Wicker chairs are arranged around tables of four for outdoor service at a restaurant in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan.
Flowers and lights hang from the outdoor dining structure at Baar Baar.
Baar Baar

Kokomo, known for its lively atmosphere, is ready for the winter season with free hot chocolate for customers and an outdoor patio equipped with plenty of electric heaters. Cozy up with riffs on classic Caribbean dishes, like creamy penne pasta and flatbreads topped with ackee and oxtail.

Flatbread pizzas, pretzel buns, mushrooms, and more menu items spread out on a table
Flatbreads from Kokomo with creamy pasta, shrimp, and oxtail.
Katrine Moite/Kokomo

Dr. Clark

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Dr. Clark is the kind of hot new(ish) restaurant you’re going to want to make a reservation for — in part, because it’s widely known downtown that they have one the city’s best heated outdoor setups. Whether you’re stopping by for tabletop grilling or Monday night karaoke, those seated outside sit on the floor with tablecloths that double as heated lap blankets.

Ping’s

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Ping’s is known for its bustling bi-level dining rooms, powered by all-day dim sum and certain seafood dishes made from live fish on display at the front of the restaurant. For a slower-paced dining experience with fewer people, head to one of the restaurant’s private dining rooms, located on the street in front of the restaurant.

A hand holds a plate of generously sauced Hong Kong style rice noodles at Pings.
Cheung fun at Ping’s.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Wu's Wonton King

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Wu’s Wonton King took full advantage of the expansive stretch of sidewalk right outside the restaurant and set up a sprawling covered outdoor dining structure with spaced-out tables set up under a string of lights and well-positioned electric heaters. The roving menu has everything necessary for a hearty winter feast, including twelve different kinds of congee and sixteen varieties of noodle soup. Another selling point: it’s BYOB.

A corner restaurant has brightly lit, block font signs saying Wu’s Wonton King.
Outside of Wu’s Wonton King.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Four Horsemen

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One of the best natural wine lists in the borough is hiding at this Brooklyn restaurant and bar, where food on the rotating menu generally runs between $15 and $40 a plate, and you can expect to order a few items. Order them from a seat at the bar’s chic wrap-around counter or out front, at a covered outdoor setup with 18 seats and a handful of electric heaters.

L'Industrie Pizzeria

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Unlike many of the restaurants on this list, there’s no advance planning required at this neighborhood slice shop: It’s never hard to find seating, even if there’s a line winding out the door and down South Second Street. L’Industrie is known for its classic New York slices, begging to be folded and made with toppings like pepperoni, burrata, and fig jam. Order a few to share and hunker down at its semi-enclosed outdoor setup with overhead heaters.

Patrons dine underneath lights in the outdoor dining; a flatscreen TV glows at the right end of the wooden structure
The outdoor structure at L’Industrie.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

If the fiery Thai cooking at Tong isn’t enough to keep you warm this winter, the Bushwick restaurant is offering blankets and heaters at its outdoor setup that’s partially shielded from the elements. There’s no going wrong with the warming broths and curries here, either: You won’t want to share the shrimpy lemongrass soup, but the spicy branzino stew and turmeric coconut crab curry are perfect for groups.

Rolo’s

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The Ridgewood restaurant from Gramercy Tavern vets has a plan to keep you toasty this winter. Its outdoor setup will have heaters along with lots of long, banquet-style seating to accommodate groups, too.

A string of market lights hangs over an outdoor table at Rolo’s, a wood-fired American restaurant in Ridgewood, Queens.
One of a half-dozen outdoor tables at Rolo’s.
Rolo’s

Winona's

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No matter whether you’re stopping by Winona’s for it’s stellar menu (Scotch eggs are the winner here), one of the ever-changing pop-ups hosted at the restaurant, or just a glass of natty wine, the outdoor heated patio is a reliable option. At Winona’s you can stay toasty in the blustery weather, while the hip crowd might make you feel as cool as ever.

Nowadays

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Nowadays is often lauded for being one of the city’s most fun dancing spots, but its restaurant, Diner by Izakaya, is often overlooked. This winter, the venue’s resident food program will offer ramen — including hearty options like tonkotsu ramen — and other Japanese-leaning bites that can be enjoyed in yurt set-ups on the back patio. There are also communal fire pits to get toasty by with a cup of hot cider or spiked hot cocoa. Currently, Nowadays’ outdoor dining set-ups are on pause, but its slated to return on January 20.

The HiHi Room

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So many pandemic-era outdoor structures look like an eyesore. By contrast, HiHi Room easily has one of the city’s most fun and aesthetically-pleasing heated open-air zones. The restaurant’s signature ketchup and mustard theme runs throughout the backyard: from its awnings to the kitschy butt warmers that are placed on select tables throughout. The knockout veggie burger and a cocktail interpretation of the childhood snack “ants on a log” are worth ordering all winter long while cozying up under the heaters.

A table and colorful branded heat seaters in the backyard of Brooklyn restaurant HiHi Room.
The backyard at HiHi Room.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Locanda Vini e Olii

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One of Clinton Hill’s most romantic restaurants is this charming Italian hit, located in a former pharmacy. Locanda Vini e Olii is located on a corner, which means there’s tons of outdoor seating options to sprawl out on both sides of the street. The restaurant has two kinds of outdoor set-ups with heaters: open-air tables with big standing heaters, as well as covered structures for when the weather is looking a bit unpredictable. Both make for excellent spots to have a date night with a saffron spritz in hand and a plate of lasagna in your belly.

Maison Yaki

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Greg Baxtrom’s more casual venture across the street from Olmsted focuses on Japanese-French small plates that you’ll want to get a group together for this cold weather season. Maison Yaki’s backyard patio is heated, which means you can play petanque out back even when the temperature starts to drop. Seating on the street side also has heaters.

The backyard at Maison Yaki, outfitted with outdoor furniture, hanging market lights, and a petanque court.
The backyard at Maison Yaki, photographed in 2019.
Gary He/Eater

Pasta Louise

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All but two of Pasta Louise’s tables are outdoors, so you better believe this Park Slope Italian restaurant is ready for the winter weather. Its sidewalk structure is decorated with flowers and market lights, making for a stylish outdoor dining experience with overhead heaters and plenty of airflow.

Outside of Pasta Louise, a family-friendly Italian restaurant in Park Slope.
Outside of Pasta Louise in Park Slope.
Pasta Louise

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Harlem Shake

Three hot dogs in buns sit side by side atop a green and white checker board paper on a blue tray
No matter the weather you can enjoy the retro menu at both Harlem Shake locations.
Harlem Shake

This uptown restaurant known for its smash burgers offers heated seating at a partially enclosed dining structure out front. A second location of Harlem Shake, which recently opened at 119 Fifth Avenue in Brooklyn’s Park Slope, also offers heated outdoor seating.

Three hot dogs in buns sit side by side atop a green and white checker board paper on a blue tray
No matter the weather you can enjoy the retro menu at both Harlem Shake locations.
Harlem Shake

LoLo's Seafood Shack

Lolo’s Seafood Shack
The exterior of LoLo’s Seafood Shack.
Lolo’s Seafood Shack

Harlem seafood destination LoLo’s Seafood Shack has built out a colorful heated cabana in its backyard, where diners can dig into its popular seafood boils, served out of plastic bags, and baskets of fried fish.

Lolo’s Seafood Shack
The exterior of LoLo’s Seafood Shack.
Lolo’s Seafood Shack

Old John's Diner

A series of private outdoor dining rooms at Upper West Side restaurant Old John’s Diner.
The outdoor dining structures at Old John’s Diner.
Old John’s Diner

Upper West Side institution Old John’s Luncheonette was resurrected last year as Old John’s Diner with expanded indoor seating and an updated menu. Outside, diners can order the same menu of egg creams and banana splits from one of five private dining structures, outfitted with electric heaters and capable of seating two to four people each.

A series of private outdoor dining rooms at Upper West Side restaurant Old John’s Diner.
The outdoor dining structures at Old John’s Diner.
Old John’s Diner

Cote Korean Steakhouse

Wine glasses and hands holding chopsticks pose at a meal that features raw slabs of beef.
A meal in one of Cote’s outdoor dining rooms.
Andre Mathur/Cote Korean Steakhouse

Velvet curtains keep the heat in and make for stylish outdoor digs at the Michelin-starred Cote. The Korean steakhouse has constructed a series of private outdoor dining rooms with electric table heaters. They can seat up to six people each.

Wine glasses and hands holding chopsticks pose at a meal that features raw slabs of beef.
A meal in one of Cote’s outdoor dining rooms.
Andre Mathur/Cote Korean Steakhouse

Mudspot

East Village mainstay Mudspot has always had an enclosed, outdoor area in its backyard. But during the pandemic, the popular coffee shop and brunch spot installed a new, open air heated structure in front of the establishment, with mod-looking floral fabric panels separating each seating area. Here, you can get all the warming notes of Mud’s signature hot chai, while cozying up under one of the heaters. The tables are all picnic-style, which makes it a rare outdoor option that’s great for group hangs.

Ho Foods

Beef noodles soup, with noodles artfully wrapped around chopsticks, from Ho Foods
The crowd-favorite beef noodle soup at Ho Foods.
Dan Ahn/Ho Foods

Ho Foods is a restaurant with small footprint and menu that nevertheless manages to pack in a ton of flavor. But thanks to its outdoor heated structure, you can enjoy one of its Taiwanese soups — considered to be one of the best bowls of soups in the city — while stretching out a bit more.

Beef noodles soup, with noodles artfully wrapped around chopsticks, from Ho Foods
The crowd-favorite beef noodle soup at Ho Foods.
Dan Ahn/Ho Foods

Cadence

Two hunks of deep-fried lasagna are arranged in a white bowl on a marble countertop.
Vegan deep-fried lasagna at Cadence.
Eric Medsker/Cadence

From this snug, alley-like restaurant, chef Shenarri Freeman is serving a head-turning array of vegan soul foods, including fried lasagna and pancakes with black-eyed peas. Indoors, those dishes and plenty others are passed over a chef’s counter to diners, but grab a seat at one of its heated outdoor tables for a meal with a little more leg room.

Two hunks of deep-fried lasagna are arranged in a white bowl on a marble countertop.
Vegan deep-fried lasagna at Cadence.
Eric Medsker/Cadence

Baar Baar

Wicker chairs are arranged around tables of four for outdoor service at a restaurant in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan.
Flowers and lights hang from the outdoor dining structure at Baar Baar.
Baar Baar

Garlands of flowers and market lights hang from Baar Baar’s outdoor structure, which is protected from rain and outfitted with overhead heaters for the colder months. The East Village gastropub with a separate vegan menu specializes in modern Indian fare, like sweet potato chaat and pork belly prepared in a tandoor oven.

Wicker chairs are arranged around tables of four for outdoor service at a restaurant in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan.
Flowers and lights hang from the outdoor dining structure at Baar Baar.
Baar Baar

Kokomo

Flatbread pizzas, pretzel buns, mushrooms, and more menu items spread out on a table
Flatbreads from Kokomo with creamy pasta, shrimp, and oxtail.
Katrine Moite/Kokomo

Kokomo, known for its lively atmosphere, is ready for the winter season with free hot chocolate for customers and an outdoor patio equipped with plenty of electric heaters. Cozy up with riffs on classic Caribbean dishes, like creamy penne pasta and flatbreads topped with ackee and oxtail.

Flatbread pizzas, pretzel buns, mushrooms, and more menu items spread out on a table
Flatbreads from Kokomo with creamy pasta, shrimp, and oxtail.
Katrine Moite/Kokomo

Dr. Clark

Dr. Clark is the kind of hot new(ish) restaurant you’re going to want to make a reservation for — in part, because it’s widely known downtown that they have one the city’s best heated outdoor setups. Whether you’re stopping by for tabletop grilling or Monday night karaoke, those seated outside sit on the floor with tablecloths that double as heated lap blankets.

Ping’s

A hand holds a plate of generously sauced Hong Kong style rice noodles at Pings.
Cheung fun at Ping’s.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Ping’s is known for its bustling bi-level dining rooms, powered by all-day dim sum and certain seafood dishes made from live fish on display at the front of the restaurant. For a slower-paced dining experience with fewer people, head to one of the restaurant’s private dining rooms, located on the street in front of the restaurant.

A hand holds a plate of generously sauced Hong Kong style rice noodles at Pings.
Cheung fun at Ping’s.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Wu's Wonton King

A corner restaurant has brightly lit, block font signs saying Wu’s Wonton King.
Outside of Wu’s Wonton King.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Wu’s Wonton King took full advantage of the expansive stretch of sidewalk right outside the restaurant and set up a sprawling covered outdoor dining structure with spaced-out tables set up under a string of lights and well-positioned electric heaters. The roving menu has everything necessary for a hearty winter feast, including twelve different kinds of congee and sixteen varieties of noodle soup. Another selling point: it’s BYOB.

A corner restaurant has brightly lit, block font signs saying Wu’s Wonton King.
Outside of Wu’s Wonton King.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Four Horsemen

One of the best natural wine lists in the borough is hiding at this Brooklyn restaurant and bar, where food on the rotating menu generally runs between $15 and $40 a plate, and you can expect to order a few items. Order them from a seat at the bar’s chic wrap-around counter or out front, at a covered outdoor setup with 18 seats and a handful of electric heaters.

L'Industrie Pizzeria

Patrons dine underneath lights in the outdoor dining; a flatscreen TV glows at the right end of the wooden structure
The outdoor structure at L’Industrie.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

Unlike many of the restaurants on this list, there’s no advance planning required at this neighborhood slice shop: It’s never hard to find seating, even if there’s a line winding out the door and down South Second Street. L’Industrie is known for its classic New York slices, begging to be folded and made with toppings like pepperoni, burrata, and fig jam. Order a few to share and hunker down at its semi-enclosed outdoor setup with overhead heaters.

Patrons dine underneath lights in the outdoor dining; a flatscreen TV glows at the right end of the wooden structure
The outdoor structure at L’Industrie.
Ryan Sutton/Eater NY

Tong

If the fiery Thai cooking at Tong isn’t enough to keep you warm this winter, the Bushwick restaurant is offering blankets and heaters at its outdoor setup that’s partially shielded from the elements. There’s no going wrong with the warming broths and curries here, either: You won’t want to share the shrimpy lemongrass soup, but the spicy branzino stew and turmeric coconut crab curry are perfect for groups.

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Rolo’s

A string of market lights hangs over an outdoor table at Rolo’s, a wood-fired American restaurant in Ridgewood, Queens.
One of a half-dozen outdoor tables at Rolo’s.
Rolo’s

The Ridgewood restaurant from Gramercy Tavern vets has a plan to keep you toasty this winter. Its outdoor setup will have heaters along with lots of long, banquet-style seating to accommodate groups, too.

A string of market lights hangs over an outdoor table at Rolo’s, a wood-fired American restaurant in Ridgewood, Queens.
One of a half-dozen outdoor tables at Rolo’s.
Rolo’s

Winona's

No matter whether you’re stopping by Winona’s for it’s stellar menu (Scotch eggs are the winner here), one of the ever-changing pop-ups hosted at the restaurant, or just a glass of natty wine, the outdoor heated patio is a reliable option. At Winona’s you can stay toasty in the blustery weather, while the hip crowd might make you feel as cool as ever.