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Peppers and octopus tentacles are served in a bowl of pale yellow broth.
The wood-fired octopus at Theodora.
Theodora

The Best Restaurants in Fort Greene and Clinton Hill

These Brooklyn neighborhoods have a handful of restaurants worth seeking out

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The wood-fired octopus at Theodora.
| Theodora

Clinton Hill and Fort Greene aren’t quite dining destinations on their own, but crammed together on a single guide, these residential neighborhoods have a handful of restaurants worth a special trip. Date-night dining rooms are well-represented here, while newer restaurants — Theodora, Fradei Bistro, and Radio Kwara — offer an excuse to splurge.

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Lula Mae

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Lula Mae takes a loose approach to Cambodian cooked, in a kitchen helmed by Dan San, formerly of restaurants like the Tyger, Nami Nori, and Chinese Tuxedo. The kitchen serves up lort cha, Cambodian rice noodles, plus fried chicken with lime pepper dressing and fry bread with tom yum butter. It’s a neighborhood spot you can actually get into as a walk-in and a reliable spot for neighborhood regulars.

A linear doughnut with gob of orange butter underneath.
Tom yum butter with the fry bread.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Saraghina Caffè

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Saraghina Caffè is the fancier sibling to the team’s Bed-Stuy pizzeria. The food is good (think supple pastas, a crudo bar, and a luxurious tiramisu), but it’s clear people come here more for its grand interiors, fashioned in the style of a cafe in Milan, that look like Brooklyn’s answer to Bar Pisellino. Either way, the people-watching is top-notch — and it’s a sexy date spot.

A green marble countertop features an orange cocktail and a white plate with a pink raw fish crudo sitting in a orange oil bath with green and red garnishes.
Crudo and a cocktail.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Colonia Verde

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This isn’t the best Latin American restaurant in Brooklyn, but it’s easily the best in Fort Greene. Husband and wife team Felipe Donnelly and Tamy Rofe, who also run Comodo out of Manhattan’s Freehand hotel, are responsible for this cozy restaurant with duck confit tacos, pão de queijo burgers, clams al pastor, and lots of wine. The restaurant is especially reliable for brunch, where it serves options beyond the run-of-the-mill eggs and pancakes. The spot has lots of seating in its backyard-covered patio, warm enough no matter the season.

Carne asada and other dishes spread on a tablecloth at Colonia Verde in Clinton Hill
Colonia Verde is the best bet for Latin American fare in Fort Greene.
Colonia Verde

Mike's Coffee Shop

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Mike’s is a Brooklyn institution that’s been in Clinton Hill for decades. True, old-school diners are increasingly hard to find in the city, but Mike’s is still holding on with its affordably priced all-day breakfast — most dishes are priced under $10 — and classic charms. Come for a tuna melt or omelet with a cup of coffee, and stay for eavesdropping on Pratt students.

Roman's

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Open since 2009, Roman’s is as good as ever, says Eater’s critic. This restaurant from Andrew Tarlow — Diner, Marlow & Sons, Achilles Heel — specializes in pastas, like rigatoni with chickpeas and pork sausage, and daily-changing specials, hitting all the right notes more than a decade later.

Tubes of pasta with greens and sausage.
A recent pasta at Roman’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Miss Ada

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Miss Ada is one of the best options in the neighborhood for a sit-down meal, and everyone seems to know it. The dining room hums with life around peak dining times — in particular during brunch. Start with an order of fluffy pita bread and a few shareable dips — whipped ricotta, lamb shawarma over hummus — then graduate to larger plates like a za’atar-crusted salmon or a brick chicken with harissa and preserved lemon. The team recently opened a wood-fired seafood restaurant, Theodora, in the neighborhood.

A hand wearing a white, long-sleeve t-shirt dips a triangle of fluffy pita into one of several dips on a table.
Don’t miss Miss Ada’s whipped ricotta.
Miss Ada

Gabriel Stulman’s first Brooklyn restaurant is a partnership with April Bloomfield, her first major project since the Spotted Pig fallout. At Sailor, Bloomfield is at the top of her game. It’s one of the flashiest openings Fort Greene has seen in the last decade, and for good reason: complex dishes like the sweetbreads, served with lemon and capers, make this a worthy neighborhood addition.

A fried sweetbread over a spinach with a creamy lemon sauce.
Fried sweatbreads.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Speedy Romeo

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Speedy Romeo, from the owner of Michelin-starred restaurant Oxomoco, is the neighborhood’s best bet for wood-fired pizza. The bubbly sourdough pies are thin and shaped into 12-inch crusts, making it possible to finish one alone. Try the Dick Dale — basically, a Hawaiian pizza for adults with pineapple and bechamel sauce — or the Mike’s Broccolini, with charred florets and sweet Italian sausage.

Radio Kwara

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With so much coverage of Dept of Culture, and two years of James Beard nominations, it’s surprising Radio Kwara hasn’t blown up. It’s as good as Dept of Culture and unlike that restaurant, you can get in easily. The format is different: Most days the menu is a la carte, with dishes like goat pepper soup and Nigerian agege bread. The tiny restaurant plays great music, and it’s BYOB with no corkage fee, so stop by next-door Radicle Wine on your way in.

Goat pepper soup at Radio Kwara.
Goat pepper soup.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

After parting ways with its initial chef, Margot has finally settled into itself with plates more substantial than typical wine bar food. The menu starts with snacks like ham and fermented honey, maitake, and butter beans. Bigger plates include items like skirt steak with miso, with a dessert of sunchoke chocolate cremeaux.

From top left to right: Pink Moon oysters with rhubarb and guajillo oil, beef tartare with crispy parsnip, and the interior of Margot.
Inside of Margot in Fort Greene.
Ronan LeMay/Margot

Place des Fêtes

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Feel hot and order small plates at Place des Fêtes, a French-sounding wine bar that specializes in Spanish wines and seafood. The restaurant, set below street level, comes from the team behind Oxalis, a former Michelin-starred tasting menu restaurant in Prospect Heights in the process of relocating. For a full meal, pricing can be more special occasion, but it’s also just as good when stopping by for a snack and glass of wine. Think dishes like crispy maitake mushroom with black garlic fudge, caraflex cabbage with yuzu, bone-in skate wing, and ham and cheeses.

An L-shaped bar with light wood and an open kitchen visible in the background.
The bar at Place des Fêtes.
Chris Coe/Place des Fêtes

Chef Katsu

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Fast-casual isn’t exactly Clinton Hill’s strong suit, but Chef Katsu upped the game when it started serving its Japanese bowls and sandwiches from this Greene Avenue storefront. The specialty here is the namesake katsu sandwiches — which come with either chicken, salmon, pork, or mushroom.  But don’t sleep on one of the rice bowls, such as the teriyaki portobello with shishito peppers, pickles, and a jammy egg. On the beverage menu, drinks run the gamut from yuzu-mint lemonade to hojicha lattes.

Bowls and katsu sandwiches at Chef Katsu laid out on a wooden picnic table.
Bowls and katsu sandwiches at Chef Katsu.
Chef Katsu

Fradei Bistro

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Since opening in 2018 Fradei has gone through several incarnations. Formerly a tasting menu spot reviewed by Pete Wells at the New York Times, Fradei is now a la carte. It’s in the hands of a one-to-watch chef, Nico Villasenor, who was previously a sous at Four Horsemen, and similar touches are attained on this loosely French-inflected Fort Greene menu. You’ll have to see it for yourself, though, as Fradei doesn’t post its menus online.

Theodora

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Theodora is laid out like a railroad apartment, and each section of the restaurant has a slightly different vibe. There’s a long bar up front, where you can sip on Mexican cocktails, and a small counter in the middle that overlooks the wood-fired oven. Further back, the large dining room has more of a party with custom speakers, booths, and bigger group tables. The menu, a bit of a departure from the team’s nearby Miss Ada, is all about wood-fired seafood and homemade breads, like sourdough and pita, plus mezcal martinis.

The bar and chef’s counter at Theodora, a new restaurant in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.
Inside the Theodora in Fort Greene.
Theodora

Locanda Vini e Olii

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Locanda Vini e Olii is located in a former pharmacy and still has vintage exterior signs to prove it. The charming, low-key interiors make Locanda feel like a true neighborhood spot, special to the area but not necessarily known across the city (though it’s a reliable, much easier-to-get-into alternative to Saraghina Caffè). Whether you’re celebrating an anniversary, or simply looking for a nice dinner out, Locanda always delivers on its spritzes — made with saffron, rosemary, and other ingredients — and pappardelle with beef ragu.

This Clinton Hill restaurant has spawned a second location in the West Village and a small chain of pizzerias operating under the name Emmy Squared. None make a burger quite like here. The legendary Emmy Burger, a thick patty topped with aged cheddar and caramelized onion on a pretzel bun, is easily one of the best in the city.

The cross-section of a dry-aged burger, blanketed in American and a handful of caramelized onions.
The legendary Emmy Burger.
Eater NY

The Fly

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Hart’s in Bed-Stuy has been a neighborhood staple since opening in 2016, and this “chicken bar” from the same team fills a similar need in Clinton Hill. Hole up at a table out front with a glass of natural wine or grab a seat at the U-shaped bar, great for feeling like a main character on a budget. The fries and Caesar salad are both massive, and the rotisserie chicken platters are best for sharing with a group.

A plate of roast chicken sits on a light wood table next to a glass of white wine.
The whole chicken with white sauce at the Fly.
Casey Kelbaugh/Eater NY

Lula Mae

Lula Mae takes a loose approach to Cambodian cooked, in a kitchen helmed by Dan San, formerly of restaurants like the Tyger, Nami Nori, and Chinese Tuxedo. The kitchen serves up lort cha, Cambodian rice noodles, plus fried chicken with lime pepper dressing and fry bread with tom yum butter. It’s a neighborhood spot you can actually get into as a walk-in and a reliable spot for neighborhood regulars.

A linear doughnut with gob of orange butter underneath.
Tom yum butter with the fry bread.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Saraghina Caffè

Saraghina Caffè is the fancier sibling to the team’s Bed-Stuy pizzeria. The food is good (think supple pastas, a crudo bar, and a luxurious tiramisu), but it’s clear people come here more for its grand interiors, fashioned in the style of a cafe in Milan, that look like Brooklyn’s answer to Bar Pisellino. Either way, the people-watching is top-notch — and it’s a sexy date spot.

A green marble countertop features an orange cocktail and a white plate with a pink raw fish crudo sitting in a orange oil bath with green and red garnishes.
Crudo and a cocktail.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Colonia Verde

This isn’t the best Latin American restaurant in Brooklyn, but it’s easily the best in Fort Greene. Husband and wife team Felipe Donnelly and Tamy Rofe, who also run Comodo out of Manhattan’s Freehand hotel, are responsible for this cozy restaurant with duck confit tacos, pão de queijo burgers, clams al pastor, and lots of wine. The restaurant is especially reliable for brunch, where it serves options beyond the run-of-the-mill eggs and pancakes. The spot has lots of seating in its backyard-covered patio, warm enough no matter the season.

Carne asada and other dishes spread on a tablecloth at Colonia Verde in Clinton Hill
Colonia Verde is the best bet for Latin American fare in Fort Greene.
Colonia Verde

Mike's Coffee Shop

Mike’s is a Brooklyn institution that’s been in Clinton Hill for decades. True, old-school diners are increasingly hard to find in the city, but Mike’s is still holding on with its affordably priced all-day breakfast — most dishes are priced under $10 — and classic charms. Come for a tuna melt or omelet with a cup of coffee, and stay for eavesdropping on Pratt students.

Roman's

Open since 2009, Roman’s is as good as ever, says Eater’s critic. This restaurant from Andrew Tarlow — Diner, Marlow & Sons, Achilles Heel — specializes in pastas, like rigatoni with chickpeas and pork sausage, and daily-changing specials, hitting all the right notes more than a decade later.

Tubes of pasta with greens and sausage.
A recent pasta at Roman’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Miss Ada

Miss Ada is one of the best options in the neighborhood for a sit-down meal, and everyone seems to know it. The dining room hums with life around peak dining times — in particular during brunch. Start with an order of fluffy pita bread and a few shareable dips — whipped ricotta, lamb shawarma over hummus — then graduate to larger plates like a za’atar-crusted salmon or a brick chicken with harissa and preserved lemon. The team recently opened a wood-fired seafood restaurant, Theodora, in the neighborhood.

A hand wearing a white, long-sleeve t-shirt dips a triangle of fluffy pita into one of several dips on a table.
Don’t miss Miss Ada’s whipped ricotta.
Miss Ada

Sailor

Gabriel Stulman’s first Brooklyn restaurant is a partnership with April Bloomfield, her first major project since the Spotted Pig fallout. At Sailor, Bloomfield is at the top of her game. It’s one of the flashiest openings Fort Greene has seen in the last decade, and for good reason: complex dishes like the sweetbreads, served with lemon and capers, make this a worthy neighborhood addition.

A fried sweetbread over a spinach with a creamy lemon sauce.
Fried sweatbreads.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Speedy Romeo

Speedy Romeo, from the owner of Michelin-starred restaurant Oxomoco, is the neighborhood’s best bet for wood-fired pizza. The bubbly sourdough pies are thin and shaped into 12-inch crusts, making it possible to finish one alone. Try the Dick Dale — basically, a Hawaiian pizza for adults with pineapple and bechamel sauce — or the Mike’s Broccolini, with charred florets and sweet Italian sausage.

Radio Kwara

With so much coverage of Dept of Culture, and two years of James Beard nominations, it’s surprising Radio Kwara hasn’t blown up. It’s as good as Dept of Culture and unlike that restaurant, you can get in easily. The format is different: Most days the menu is a la carte, with dishes like goat pepper soup and Nigerian agege bread. The tiny restaurant plays great music, and it’s BYOB with no corkage fee, so stop by next-door Radicle Wine on your way in.

Goat pepper soup at Radio Kwara.
Goat pepper soup.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Margot

After parting ways with its initial chef, Margot has finally settled into itself with plates more substantial than typical wine bar food. The menu starts with snacks like ham and fermented honey, maitake, and butter beans. Bigger plates include items like skirt steak with miso, with a dessert of sunchoke chocolate cremeaux.

From top left to right: Pink Moon oysters with rhubarb and guajillo oil, beef tartare with crispy parsnip, and the interior of Margot.
Inside of Margot in Fort Greene.
Ronan LeMay/Margot

Place des Fêtes

Feel hot and order small plates at Place des Fêtes, a French-sounding wine bar that specializes in Spanish wines and seafood. The restaurant, set below street level, comes from the team behind Oxalis, a former Michelin-starred tasting menu restaurant in Prospect Heights in the process of relocating. For a full meal, pricing can be more special occasion, but it’s also just as good when stopping by for a snack and glass of wine. Think dishes like crispy maitake mushroom with black garlic fudge, caraflex cabbage with yuzu, bone-in skate wing, and ham and cheeses.

An L-shaped bar with light wood and an open kitchen visible in the background.
The bar at Place des Fêtes.
Chris Coe/Place des Fêtes

Chef Katsu

Fast-casual isn’t exactly Clinton Hill’s strong suit, but Chef Katsu upped the game when it started serving its Japanese bowls and sandwiches from this Greene Avenue storefront. The specialty here is the namesake katsu sandwiches — which come with either chicken, salmon, pork, or mushroom.  But don’t sleep on one of the rice bowls, such as the teriyaki portobello with shishito peppers, pickles, and a jammy egg. On the beverage menu, drinks run the gamut from yuzu-mint lemonade to hojicha lattes.

Bowls and katsu sandwiches at Chef Katsu laid out on a wooden picnic table.
Bowls and katsu sandwiches at Chef Katsu.
Chef Katsu

Fradei Bistro

Since opening in 2018 Fradei has gone through several incarnations. Formerly a tasting menu spot reviewed by Pete Wells at the New York Times, Fradei is now a la carte. It’s in the hands of a one-to-watch chef, Nico Villasenor, who was previously a sous at Four Horsemen, and similar touches are attained on this loosely French-inflected Fort Greene menu. You’ll have to see it for yourself, though, as Fradei doesn’t post its menus online.

Theodora

Theodora is laid out like a railroad apartment, and each section of the restaurant has a slightly different vibe. There’s a long bar up front, where you can sip on Mexican cocktails, and a small counter in the middle that overlooks the wood-fired oven. Further back, the large dining room has more of a party with custom speakers, booths, and bigger group tables. The menu, a bit of a departure from the team’s nearby Miss Ada, is all about wood-fired seafood and homemade breads, like sourdough and pita, plus mezcal martinis.

The bar and chef’s counter at Theodora, a new restaurant in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.
Inside the Theodora in Fort Greene.
Theodora

Locanda Vini e Olii

Locanda Vini e Olii is located in a former pharmacy and still has vintage exterior signs to prove it. The charming, low-key interiors make Locanda feel like a true neighborhood spot, special to the area but not necessarily known across the city (though it’s a reliable, much easier-to-get-into alternative to Saraghina Caffè). Whether you’re celebrating an anniversary, or simply looking for a nice dinner out, Locanda always delivers on its spritzes — made with saffron, rosemary, and other ingredients — and pappardelle with beef ragu.

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Emily

This Clinton Hill restaurant has spawned a second location in the West Village and a small chain of pizzerias operating under the name Emmy Squared. None make a burger quite like here. The legendary Emmy Burger, a thick patty topped with aged cheddar and caramelized onion on a pretzel bun, is easily one of the best in the city.

The cross-section of a dry-aged burger, blanketed in American and a handful of caramelized onions.
The legendary Emmy Burger.
Eater NY

The Fly

Hart’s in Bed-Stuy has been a neighborhood staple since opening in 2016, and this “chicken bar” from the same team fills a similar need in Clinton Hill. Hole up at a table out front with a glass of natural wine or grab a seat at the U-shaped bar, great for feeling like a main character on a budget. The fries and Caesar salad are both massive, and the rotisserie chicken platters are best for sharing with a group.

A plate of roast chicken sits on a light wood table next to a glass of white wine.
The whole chicken with white sauce at the Fly.
Casey Kelbaugh/Eater NY

Related Maps