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A series of bowls with Chinese food like dumplings, roasted duck, and spicy cauliflower on a white table with some hands holding chopsticks.
A spread of Chinese dishes at Milu.
Milu/Evan Sung

15 Noteworthy Restaurants in Flatiron and Gramercy

Some very standout burgers, many Michelin stars, and more

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A spread of Chinese dishes at Milu.
| Milu/Evan Sung

Conveniently perched between uptown and downtown Manhattan, the neighborhoods of Flatiron and Gramercy often function as that agreeable meeting point for a dinner that feels like a safe middle ground. Despite its convenience, the area doesn’t have a reputation for being a restaurant destination. But there’s a lot more to discover in these adjacent neighborhoods besides seemingly every fancy salad lunch chain: there are fine dining establishments like Gramercy Tavern, classic burger joints like Joe Jr., and excellent Georgian fare at Chito Gvrito. A little research provides plenty of options for a noteworthy meal.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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1. Shake Shack

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Madison Ave & E 23rd St
New York, NY 10010
(212) 889-6600
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The O.G. location of Danny Meyer’s hit burger chain is this humble stand inside Madison Square Park. And while there are now locations scattered all over the city (and the world), there’s something special about the very first outpost, especially when the weather is nice. It’s hard to top the simple pleasure of a Shack Stack eaten outside. On nice days, expect a long line, but it moves.

A Shake Shack burger in paper wrapping rests on top of crinkly fries. Nick Solares/Eater

2. Milu

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333 Park Ave S
New York, NY 10010
(212) 377-6403
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Former Eleven Madison Park chef Connie Chung is applying her fine dining chops to a Chinese counter service restaurant that opened in fall of 2020. Milu serves some of the best bowl food in the city, including Sichuan-spiced cauliflower, soy-roasted chicken with garlic ginger, and fluffy pineapple buns that work just as well for dining in or takeout.

Crispy duck leg sits over rice next to a watercress salad and chile cucumbers; a small ramekin of chile crisp sits next to the dish in this overhead shot.
Crispy duck leg over rice at Milu.
Gary He/Eater NY

3. Cote Korean Steakhouse

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16 W 22nd St
New York, NY 10010
(212) 401-7986
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This stylish, Michelin-starred Korean-American steakhouse comes courtesy of former Piora owner Simon Kim, who decided to apply the American steakhouse genre to Korean barbecue. The menu’s got a mix of chophouse standards with subtle Korean flavor nods, made with beef that’s dry-aged on site and cooked tabletop. Opt for the butcher’s feast, priced at $64 per person and featuring four different meat cuts, banchan (small dishes with various pickled or fermented vegetables), salads, two stews, egg souffle, and soft serve. For a la carte ordering, there’s a range of steak plus options like bibimbap and kimchi stew.

4. TKK Fried Chicken

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115 E 23rd St
New York, NY 10010
(646) 476-2013
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This KFC equivalent in Taiwan opened up its first NYC location as a combination TKK and Kung Fu bubble tea shop in November 2018. Expect an extra-crunchy exterior and skinless, tender meat on these birds. Besides the namesake chicken, there are equally decadent add-ons, available a la carte or in combos, like biscuits and kwa kwa bao, a TKK invention comprised of mushroom sticky rice cloaked in chicken skin, then fried.

<span data-author="-1">Fried chicken at TKK</span> Adam Moussa/Eater

5. Cosme

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35 E 21st St
New York, NY 10010
(212) 913-9659
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This modern Mexican restaurant from chef Enrique Olvera serves eclectic and elegantly plated dishes. The duck carnitas tacos are a highlight, as are tataki al pastor, and corn husk meringue for dessert. One of Cosme’s best dishes, the lamb barbacoa, is only served at brunch. Note that the prices have gotten substantially steeper since opening in 2013; consider this a more special-occasion spot.

6. Hawksmoor NYC

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109 E 22nd St
New York, NY 10010
(212) 777-1840
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This U.K.-based chain’s first stateside location garnered attention for its steak menu and opulent dining room inside the restored United Charities Building in Gramercy. But what shouldn’t be overlooked, as Eater critic Ryan Sutton notes, are the sub $30 steaks — a dry-aged rump roast and the lamb T-bones — that are not only a good value but stand up to some of the best steakhouses in NYC. Dessert should also not be skipped.

The charred rump steak sits on a white plate.
The rump steak at Hawksmoor.
Hawksmoor

7. Rezdôra

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27 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003
(646) 692-9090
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One of the most popular restaurants in the city for Italian food, Rezdôra is not easy to get into. For diners patient enough to score a seat, however, chef Stefano Secchi serves a rustic menu that nods to and has been praised by critics across town. One of the most popular dishes here is the Grandma Walking Through the Forest in Emilia, where green-colored morsels filled with leeks sit on a bed of earthy mushrooms. For those who don’t want pasta, the menu also includes dry-aged ribeye and whole fish.

Uovo pasta, cappelletti, tagliolini al ragu sit on elegant blue and white plates at Rezdora.
A series of pastas at Rezdôra.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

8. Singapura

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31 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003
(646) 429-9986
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At first glance, Salil Mehta’s Singapura may appear to focus on the food of Singapore, but the menu actually highlights many dishes that are prominent throughout Southeast Asia. The chef features classics like sting ray laced in spicy sambal and wrapped in a banana leaf; Hainanese breaded pork chop, and various noodle dishes, including bak chor mee (braised noodles topped with ground pork and liver, chiles, and mushroom), popular at hawker stands. The drinks side of the menu draws on a tiki bar vibe with tropical cocktails to pair with the food.

9. Sugarfish

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33 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003
(347) 705-8100
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This popular Los Angeles import, offering ultra-fresh and affordable omakase from sushi chef Kazunori Nozawa, still generates long waits at its first East Coast outpost. That’s because the omakase choices are all well under $100, and include various types of salmon, tuna, yellowtail, and albacore, with edamame to start. A la carte ordering is available, too, though the omakases are a better deal and generally quite satisfying. The iced green tea, refreshing and strong, is worth adding on, too. There are now three other locations in NYC.

Sugarfish Nick Solares/Eater

10. Gramercy Tavern

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42 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 477-0777
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While Union Square Cafe is technically Danny Meyer’s oldest establishment, Gramercy Tavern — opened in 1994 — is an essential part of his sizable empire and a quintessential NYC American restaurant. Chef Michael Anthony offers a tasting menu at dinner in the more formal-feeling dining room that’s elegant, where the white-tablecloth space feels very special occasion-worthy. The menu evolves seasonally, but light, elegant seafood and vegetable-based dishes are the main attraction. There’s also the more-casual tavern space up front with an a la carte menu available at lunch and dinner.

11. Union Square Cafe

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101 E 19th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 243-4020
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Danny Meyer’s first restaurant, which opened in 1985 and has been an important part of the NYC dining scene ever since, moved northeast of its original 16th Street digs in 2016. One of the city’s best burgers and strong pastas are the way to go at Union Square Cafe 2.0. The newer space is a bit bigger and fancier, with all of the same art (and cream walls) as the original location. Be sure to stop by sister cafe Daily Provisions for to-go coffee and baked goods like an on-point cruller.

steak tartare Nick Solares/Eater

12. GupShup

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115 E 18th St
New York, NY 10003
(212) 518-7313
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Modern Indian fare is served up in a vibrant, pattern-packed space at GupShup, which opened in November 2018. The decor aims to look like a fictitious Bombay family’s abode, circa the ’70s, while the creative food — bone marrow with five-spice naan — comes courtesy of executive chef Gurpreet Singh, an alum of Indian Accent and Punjab Grill.

13. Chito Gvrito

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173 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003
(646) 767-0154
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If the recent rise of Georgian restaurants in New York City had to be traced back to one dish, it would no doubt be khachapuri adjaruli. The hollowed out bread that looks like a boat filled with molten cheese, butter, and sometimes a raw egg yolk is a star dish at Chito Gvrito. But there are nearly a half dozen versions of khachapuri here along with lamb chops and eggplant rolls that make this spot stand out among the recent spate of Georgian establishments opening across the city.

A round bread with two opposing bread handles and cheese and an uncooked egg yolk in a pool in the middle.
Khachapuri at Chito Gvrito.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

14. Joe Jr.

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167 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003
(212) 473-5150

At this lowkey diner-coffee shop, frequented by locals and looking blissfully untouched by time, resides one of the city’s best burgers. The no-frills, griddled burger here is crafted from seven ounces of fresh ground chuck. A standard white bun encases the juicy, crumbly patty, which is accessorized with the classics: lettuce, tomato, pickle, onion, and, if desired, American cheese.

An open-faced burger and fries on a white plate with tomatoes, lettuce, and a pickle on the side Nick Solares/Eater

15. So Do Fun

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155 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003
(646) 822-3530
Visit Website

Just north of the East Village, where a spate of upscale Chinese restaurants have opened in recent years, the first American outlet of So Do Fun has opened with a focus on presenting Sichuan food for Cantonese tastes. As Eater critic Robert Sietsema reported, some dishes like stir fried double cooked pork belly are straightforward interpretations of Sichuanese cooking while other parts of the menu focus on fusing chile-laden recipes with Canto fare, like the maoxue wang, a dish full of red chile oil teeming with pork liver, tripe, and slices of spam.

A white porcelain bowl filled with eggs, sauce, shrimp, and broccoli.
Steamed eggs with shrimp at So Do Fun.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

1. Shake Shack

Madison Ave & E 23rd St, New York, NY 10010
A Shake Shack burger in paper wrapping rests on top of crinkly fries. Nick Solares/Eater

The O.G. location of Danny Meyer’s hit burger chain is this humble stand inside Madison Square Park. And while there are now locations scattered all over the city (and the world), there’s something special about the very first outpost, especially when the weather is nice. It’s hard to top the simple pleasure of a Shack Stack eaten outside. On nice days, expect a long line, but it moves.

Madison Ave & E 23rd St
New York, NY 10010

2. Milu

333 Park Ave S, New York, NY 10010
Crispy duck leg sits over rice next to a watercress salad and chile cucumbers; a small ramekin of chile crisp sits next to the dish in this overhead shot.
Crispy duck leg over rice at Milu.
Gary He/Eater NY

Former Eleven Madison Park chef Connie Chung is applying her fine dining chops to a Chinese counter service restaurant that opened in fall of 2020. Milu serves some of the best bowl food in the city, including Sichuan-spiced cauliflower, soy-roasted chicken with garlic ginger, and fluffy pineapple buns that work just as well for dining in or takeout.

333 Park Ave S
New York, NY 10010

3. Cote Korean Steakhouse

16 W 22nd St, New York, NY 10010

This stylish, Michelin-starred Korean-American steakhouse comes courtesy of former Piora owner Simon Kim, who decided to apply the American steakhouse genre to Korean barbecue. The menu’s got a mix of chophouse standards with subtle Korean flavor nods, made with beef that’s dry-aged on site and cooked tabletop. Opt for the butcher’s feast, priced at $64 per person and featuring four different meat cuts, banchan (small dishes with various pickled or fermented vegetables), salads, two stews, egg souffle, and soft serve. For a la carte ordering, there’s a range of steak plus options like bibimbap and kimchi stew.

16 W 22nd St
New York, NY 10010

4. TKK Fried Chicken

115 E 23rd St, New York, NY 10010
<span data-author="-1">Fried chicken at TKK</span> Adam Moussa/Eater

This KFC equivalent in Taiwan opened up its first NYC location as a combination TKK and Kung Fu bubble tea shop in November 2018. Expect an extra-crunchy exterior and skinless, tender meat on these birds. Besides the namesake chicken, there are equally decadent add-ons, available a la carte or in combos, like biscuits and kwa kwa bao, a TKK invention comprised of mushroom sticky rice cloaked in chicken skin, then fried.

115 E 23rd St
New York, NY 10010

5. Cosme

35 E 21st St, New York, NY 10010
Read Review |

This modern Mexican restaurant from chef Enrique Olvera serves eclectic and elegantly plated dishes. The duck carnitas tacos are a highlight, as are tataki al pastor, and corn husk meringue for dessert. One of Cosme’s best dishes, the lamb barbacoa, is only served at brunch. Note that the prices have gotten substantially steeper since opening in 2013; consider this a more special-occasion spot.

35 E 21st St
New York, NY 10010

6. Hawksmoor NYC

109 E 22nd St, New York, NY 10010
The charred rump steak sits on a white plate.
The rump steak at Hawksmoor.
Hawksmoor

This U.K.-based chain’s first stateside location garnered attention for its steak menu and opulent dining room inside the restored United Charities Building in Gramercy. But what shouldn’t be overlooked, as Eater critic Ryan Sutton notes, are the sub $30 steaks — a dry-aged rump roast and the lamb T-bones — that are not only a good value but stand up to some of the best steakhouses in NYC. Dessert should also not be skipped.

109 E 22nd St
New York, NY 10010

7. Rezdôra

27 E 20th St, New York, NY 10003
Read Review |
Uovo pasta, cappelletti, tagliolini al ragu sit on elegant blue and white plates at Rezdora.
A series of pastas at Rezdôra.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

One of the most popular restaurants in the city for Italian food, Rezdôra is not easy to get into. For diners patient enough to score a seat, however, chef Stefano Secchi serves a rustic menu that nods to and has been praised by critics across town. One of the most popular dishes here is the Grandma Walking Through the Forest in Emilia, where green-colored morsels filled with leeks sit on a bed of earthy mushrooms. For those who don’t want pasta, the menu also includes dry-aged ribeye and whole fish.

27 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003

8. Singapura

31 E 20th St, New York, NY 10003

At first glance, Salil Mehta’s Singapura may appear to focus on the food of Singapore, but the menu actually highlights many dishes that are prominent throughout Southeast Asia. The chef features classics like sting ray laced in spicy sambal and wrapped in a banana leaf; Hainanese breaded pork chop, and various noodle dishes, including bak chor mee (braised noodles topped with ground pork and liver, chiles, and mushroom), popular at hawker stands. The drinks side of the menu draws on a tiki bar vibe with tropical cocktails to pair with the food.

31 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003

9. Sugarfish

33 E 20th St, New York, NY 10003
Sugarfish Nick Solares/Eater

This popular Los Angeles import, offering ultra-fresh and affordable omakase from sushi chef Kazunori Nozawa, still generates long waits at its first East Coast outpost. That’s because the omakase choices are all well under $100, and include various types of salmon, tuna, yellowtail, and albacore, with edamame to start. A la carte ordering is available, too, though the omakases are a better deal and generally quite satisfying. The iced green tea, refreshing and strong, is worth adding on, too. There are now three other locations in NYC.

33 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003

10. Gramercy Tavern

42 E 20th St, New York, NY 10003

While Union Square Cafe is technically Danny Meyer’s oldest establishment, Gramercy Tavern — opened in 1994 — is an essential part of his sizable empire and a quintessential NYC American restaurant. Chef Michael Anthony offers a tasting menu at dinner in the more formal-feeling dining room that’s elegant, where the white-tablecloth space feels very special occasion-worthy. The menu evolves seasonally, but light, elegant seafood and vegetable-based dishes are the main attraction. There’s also the more-casual tavern space up front with an a la carte menu available at lunch and dinner.

42 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003

11. Union Square Cafe

101 E 19th St, New York, NY 10003
Read Review |
steak tartare Nick Solares/Eater

Danny Meyer’s first restaurant, which opened in 1985 and has been an important part of the NYC dining scene ever since, moved northeast of its original 16th Street digs in 2016. One of the city’s best burgers and strong pastas are the way to go at Union Square Cafe 2.0. The newer space is a bit bigger and fancier, with all of the same art (and cream walls) as the original location. Be sure to stop by sister cafe Daily Provisions for to-go coffee and baked goods like an on-point cruller.

101 E 19th St
New York, NY 10003

12. GupShup

115 E 18th St, New York, NY 10003
Read Review |

Modern Indian fare is served up in a vibrant, pattern-packed space at GupShup, which opened in November 2018. The decor aims to look like a fictitious Bombay family’s abode, circa the ’70s, while the creative food — bone marrow with five-spice naan — comes courtesy of executive chef Gurpreet Singh, an alum of Indian Accent and Punjab Grill.

115 E 18th St
New York, NY 10003

13. Chito Gvrito

173 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10003
A round bread with two opposing bread handles and cheese and an uncooked egg yolk in a pool in the middle.
Khachapuri at Chito Gvrito.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

If the recent rise of Georgian restaurants in New York City had to be traced back to one dish, it would no doubt be khachapuri adjaruli. The hollowed out bread that looks like a boat filled with molten cheese, butter, and sometimes a raw egg yolk is a star dish at Chito Gvrito. But there are nearly a half dozen versions of khachapuri here along with lamb chops and eggplant rolls that make this spot stand out among the recent spate of Georgian establishments opening across the city.

173 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003

14. Joe Jr.

167 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10003
An open-faced burger and fries on a white plate with tomatoes, lettuce, and a pickle on the side Nick Solares/Eater

At this lowkey diner-coffee shop, frequented by locals and looking blissfully untouched by time, resides one of the city’s best burgers. The no-frills, griddled burger here is crafted from seven ounces of fresh ground chuck. A standard white bun encases the juicy, crumbly patty, which is accessorized with the classics: lettuce, tomato, pickle, onion, and, if desired, American cheese.

167 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003

15. So Do Fun

155 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10003
A white porcelain bowl filled with eggs, sauce, shrimp, and broccoli.
Steamed eggs with shrimp at So Do Fun.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Just north of the East Village, where a spate of upscale Chinese restaurants have opened in recent years, the first American outlet of So Do Fun has opened with a focus on presenting Sichuan food for Cantonese tastes. As Eater critic Robert Sietsema reported, some dishes like stir fried double cooked pork belly are straightforward interpretations of Sichuanese cooking while other parts of the menu focus on fusing chile-laden recipes with Canto fare, like the maoxue wang, a dish full of red chile oil teeming with pork liver, tripe, and slices of spam.

155 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10003

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