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Smoked hamachi tacos in a do-it-yourself setup.
Smoked hamachi tacos at Metropolis.
Metropolis

The Best Restaurants in Fidi

Ball out like a banker

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Smoked hamachi tacos at Metropolis.
| Metropolis

If you’re dining in the Financial District, it is likely that you are visiting Wall Street on a field trip, work in the area, are going to a doctor’s appointment, or live in one of the many new luxury towers sprouting up. The area has a long way to go to be known as a paradise for good food, but these days, luckily, there are more options than ever. For a map of Fidi lunch spots under $20, head here.

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Metropolis by Marcus Samuelsson

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Located inside the new $500 million Perelman Performing Arts Center near One World Trade is celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson’s new restaurant. As the name suggests, the restaurant takes New York City itself as inspiration, hoping to approximate the various boroughs’ culinary traditions, remixed in a fine dining context, such as an oyster dish nodding to Flushing.

A sleek bar in taupe and rust colors.
The dining room at Metropolis.
Adrian Gaut/Metropolis

Best Sicily Bottega

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The first time you step into Best Sicily Bottega, you might wonder if you’re in the right place: The store is stacked from floor to ceiling with imported Italian foods. There are red and green pestos, panettone left over from the holidays, and at least six kinds of olive oil. In the middle of the shop, there’s a small pastry case. That’s where you’ll find the softball-sized arancini. The selection seems to change, whether they’re stuffed with beef ragu and green peas, or eggplant and tomato. The place is more of a lunch stop, but it’s open until 8 p.m. weekdays and 6 p.m. Saturday.

A person wearing a lavender sweater holds a cone-shaped arancine.
A cone-shaped arancine.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Le Gratin

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Le Gratin is a “Wall Street hangout where charm still prevails,” writes Eater critic Robert Sietsema. Here, Daniel Boulud — one of the city’s most prolific providers of French restaurants — focuses on his roots in Lyon, France, in a space once home to Keith McNally’s Augustine. The move here is the restaurant’s namesake dish: the cheesy potato gratin.

A blue oval dish filled with one long quenelle with a burnt top, sitting in a creamy white sauce.
Le Gratin specializes in the dish the restaurant is named for.
Bill Milne/Le Gratin

Pisillo Italian Panini

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Good bread and an impressive selection of high-quality Italian cured meats, from sopressata to mortadella, have earned this sandwich shop a following. The portions are almost laughably generous: a single sandwich can easily feed two or more diners. Pisillo isn’t perfect — a sandwich might be marred by a wan winter tomato, or call out for some sort of dressing to moisten it — but the fundamentals of a quality deli are there.

A hero sandwich with fresh mozzarella and meats.
Sandwich from Pisillo.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Dim Sum Palace

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Unlike its late-night Chinatown sibling on Division Street, this location of Dim Sum Palace only stays open until 10 p.m. But it is an ideal pick for group dining, especially without a reservation. Find Cantonese dim sum classics here like shrimp shumai dumplings, rice rolls, and more.

A pair of hands wielding a fork and knife dissects a steak beside a plate of lobster and pea shoots.
Beef and broccoli from Dim Sum Palace.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Got a big group? Roberto Caporuscio’s cavernous restaurant has plenty of seating in cozy booths and tables where it’s not too loud. Caporuscio is one of the Italians who, back in the ’90s, helped fuel a national obsession for Neapolitan pies. They’re still very good here (in Keste’s last Manhattan outpost), but don’t miss the arancini, the Sicilian salad with fennel and orange, and the montanara, a variation on fried pizza.

A Keste pizza dough with tomatoes on it, in front of an oven.
A pizza in front of the oven at Keste.
Keste

Manhatta

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Sixty floors up, Danny Meyer’s Manhatta offers some of the best dining views in the neighborhood. Its dining room looks out onto the East River, the Manhattan Bridge, and Brooklyn, and behind the walnut and granite bar, the rest of downtown Manhattan is visible. The restaurant has changed since it initially opened. Today, it offers an a la carte menu and a $275-per-person tasting menu.

Manhatta
The soaring view at Manhatta.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Fish Market

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Fish Market, located across from Pier 17 and the Tin Building food hall, is a holdover from another time. Part dive bar, part restaurant, it’s one of the few places in town where a whole lobster comes with a free shot of vodka. This isn’t the place to take your client out to dinner: The glass in the front window has been shattered for years, and the selection of drinks here ranges from bottled Bud Light to cans of White Claw. All the same, it’s a beloved haunt in the area that happens to serve shrimp puffs, dumplings, and scallion pancakes. .

Pearl Diner

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Pearl has stood out since the 1960s in the high-rise-ridden Financial District, serving up big breakfast plates in a tiny, quintessential diner space. During the week it opens at 8 a.m., and nearby office workers start filing in soon after for a morning meal. The menu offers more than 40 burgers, but stick to a classic cheeseburger or bacon burger, with fries. Don’t expect frills.

Pearl Diner
Pearl Diner in FiDi stands out as history amongst the high-rises.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

XPizza is a pizzeria and “multidisciplinary platform” curiously located near the South Street Seaport, of all places, where you can dance to some actually good DJs, and be in bed by 10 p.m. if you want to — preferably with a slice in hand. The crowd features spillover from nearby Dimes Square. At night, there’s dancing, but the space is tiny. Be ready to bump shoulders.

Crown Shy

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70 Pine Street is restaurateur James Kent’s tower of fine dining. At the ground level is Crown Shy, a restaurant that opened in 2019 that manages to hit notes of special occasion dining while not feeling fussy. Pastry chef Renata Ameni’s desserts — like the orange satsuma ice cream — are as important to try as its main courses. Upstairs, the same team operates Saga, a tasting menu restaurant on the building’s 63rd floor, and Overstory, its sibling rooftop cocktail bar.

An ornate, high-ceilinged dining room is filled with tables and chairs. Custom light fixtures hang from the ceilings.
The dining room at Crown Shy.
Chris Payne/Crown Shy

Serafina Vino e Cucina

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From the people behind Serafina, Vino e Cucina, serving lunch and dinner, merges Serafina’s Italian favorites with Italian wines; each menu item has a wine pairing. The newly opened 75-seat restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating offers antipasti, pizzas, pastas and more.

The inside of a wine bar restaurant.
Inside Vino e Cucina.
Vino e Cucina

Tin Building by Jean-Georges

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Eight years in the making, celebrity chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten opened the Tin Building — a massive complex complete with several restaurants and retail shops — in 2022. Stretching 53,000-square-feet, and several floors, one could spend a whole day in the space alone trying dishes from all over the world. In an era of food hall overload, the Tin Building puts its own luxury spins on the genre.

A sunny room full of tables.
T. Brasserie at the Tin Building serves French bistro fare.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Fraunces Tavern

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There are hundreds of whiskeys, beers, and ciders to select from at this long-running tavern with a storied history that dates back to 1762. Ownership has changed hands many times through the years, and at times, its fate has hung in the balance. But it’s still kicking, offering booze and tavern fare like fish and chips, steak, and a slow-roasted chicken pot pie in a low-lit, dark-wooded space.

Metropolis by Marcus Samuelsson

Located inside the new $500 million Perelman Performing Arts Center near One World Trade is celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson’s new restaurant. As the name suggests, the restaurant takes New York City itself as inspiration, hoping to approximate the various boroughs’ culinary traditions, remixed in a fine dining context, such as an oyster dish nodding to Flushing.

A sleek bar in taupe and rust colors.
The dining room at Metropolis.
Adrian Gaut/Metropolis

Best Sicily Bottega

The first time you step into Best Sicily Bottega, you might wonder if you’re in the right place: The store is stacked from floor to ceiling with imported Italian foods. There are red and green pestos, panettone left over from the holidays, and at least six kinds of olive oil. In the middle of the shop, there’s a small pastry case. That’s where you’ll find the softball-sized arancini. The selection seems to change, whether they’re stuffed with beef ragu and green peas, or eggplant and tomato. The place is more of a lunch stop, but it’s open until 8 p.m. weekdays and 6 p.m. Saturday.

A person wearing a lavender sweater holds a cone-shaped arancine.
A cone-shaped arancine.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Le Gratin

Le Gratin is a “Wall Street hangout where charm still prevails,” writes Eater critic Robert Sietsema. Here, Daniel Boulud — one of the city’s most prolific providers of French restaurants — focuses on his roots in Lyon, France, in a space once home to Keith McNally’s Augustine. The move here is the restaurant’s namesake dish: the cheesy potato gratin.

A blue oval dish filled with one long quenelle with a burnt top, sitting in a creamy white sauce.
Le Gratin specializes in the dish the restaurant is named for.
Bill Milne/Le Gratin

Pisillo Italian Panini

Good bread and an impressive selection of high-quality Italian cured meats, from sopressata to mortadella, have earned this sandwich shop a following. The portions are almost laughably generous: a single sandwich can easily feed two or more diners. Pisillo isn’t perfect — a sandwich might be marred by a wan winter tomato, or call out for some sort of dressing to moisten it — but the fundamentals of a quality deli are there.

A hero sandwich with fresh mozzarella and meats.
Sandwich from Pisillo.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Dim Sum Palace

Unlike its late-night Chinatown sibling on Division Street, this location of Dim Sum Palace only stays open until 10 p.m. But it is an ideal pick for group dining, especially without a reservation. Find Cantonese dim sum classics here like shrimp shumai dumplings, rice rolls, and more.

A pair of hands wielding a fork and knife dissects a steak beside a plate of lobster and pea shoots.
Beef and broccoli from Dim Sum Palace.
Jutharat Pinyodoonyachet/Eater NY

Kesté

Got a big group? Roberto Caporuscio’s cavernous restaurant has plenty of seating in cozy booths and tables where it’s not too loud. Caporuscio is one of the Italians who, back in the ’90s, helped fuel a national obsession for Neapolitan pies. They’re still very good here (in Keste’s last Manhattan outpost), but don’t miss the arancini, the Sicilian salad with fennel and orange, and the montanara, a variation on fried pizza.

A Keste pizza dough with tomatoes on it, in front of an oven.
A pizza in front of the oven at Keste.
Keste

Manhatta

Sixty floors up, Danny Meyer’s Manhatta offers some of the best dining views in the neighborhood. Its dining room looks out onto the East River, the Manhattan Bridge, and Brooklyn, and behind the walnut and granite bar, the rest of downtown Manhattan is visible. The restaurant has changed since it initially opened. Today, it offers an a la carte menu and a $275-per-person tasting menu.

Manhatta
The soaring view at Manhatta.
Alex Staniloff/Eater NY

Fish Market

Fish Market, located across from Pier 17 and the Tin Building food hall, is a holdover from another time. Part dive bar, part restaurant, it’s one of the few places in town where a whole lobster comes with a free shot of vodka. This isn’t the place to take your client out to dinner: The glass in the front window has been shattered for years, and the selection of drinks here ranges from bottled Bud Light to cans of White Claw. All the same, it’s a beloved haunt in the area that happens to serve shrimp puffs, dumplings, and scallion pancakes. .

Pearl Diner

Pearl has stood out since the 1960s in the high-rise-ridden Financial District, serving up big breakfast plates in a tiny, quintessential diner space. During the week it opens at 8 a.m., and nearby office workers start filing in soon after for a morning meal. The menu offers more than 40 burgers, but stick to a classic cheeseburger or bacon burger, with fries. Don’t expect frills.

Pearl Diner
Pearl Diner in FiDi stands out as history amongst the high-rises.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Xpizza

XPizza is a pizzeria and “multidisciplinary platform” curiously located near the South Street Seaport, of all places, where you can dance to some actually good DJs, and be in bed by 10 p.m. if you want to — preferably with a slice in hand. The crowd features spillover from nearby Dimes Square. At night, there’s dancing, but the space is tiny. Be ready to bump shoulders.

Crown Shy

70 Pine Street is restaurateur James Kent’s tower of fine dining. At the ground level is Crown Shy, a restaurant that opened in 2019 that manages to hit notes of special occasion dining while not feeling fussy. Pastry chef Renata Ameni’s desserts — like the orange satsuma ice cream — are as important to try as its main courses. Upstairs, the same team operates Saga, a tasting menu restaurant on the building’s 63rd floor, and Overstory, its sibling rooftop cocktail bar.

An ornate, high-ceilinged dining room is filled with tables and chairs. Custom light fixtures hang from the ceilings.
The dining room at Crown Shy.
Chris Payne/Crown Shy

Serafina Vino e Cucina

From the people behind Serafina, Vino e Cucina, serving lunch and dinner, merges Serafina’s Italian favorites with Italian wines; each menu item has a wine pairing. The newly opened 75-seat restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating offers antipasti, pizzas, pastas and more.

The inside of a wine bar restaurant.
Inside Vino e Cucina.
Vino e Cucina

Tin Building by Jean-Georges

Eight years in the making, celebrity chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten opened the Tin Building — a massive complex complete with several restaurants and retail shops — in 2022. Stretching 53,000-square-feet, and several floors, one could spend a whole day in the space alone trying dishes from all over the world. In an era of food hall overload, the Tin Building puts its own luxury spins on the genre.

A sunny room full of tables.
T. Brasserie at the Tin Building serves French bistro fare.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Fraunces Tavern

There are hundreds of whiskeys, beers, and ciders to select from at this long-running tavern with a storied history that dates back to 1762. Ownership has changed hands many times through the years, and at times, its fate has hung in the balance. But it’s still kicking, offering booze and tavern fare like fish and chips, steak, and a slow-roasted chicken pot pie in a low-lit, dark-wooded space.

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