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A round cracker with shrimp and other seafood piled high, topped with sliced and fanned avocado.
Ceviche mixto tostada at El Submarino.

14 Refreshing Ceviche Dishes in NYC

Where to find citrusy and spicy shrimp, squid, octopus, and more

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Ceviche mixto tostada at El Submarino.

It’s generally agreed that ceviche originated in Peru and Ecuador — countries that separately developed the tradition of eating seafood raw after marinating it in citrus and other ingredients like chiles and onions. Mexico was also not far behind in developing its own types of ceviche. This way of cooking produces an opacity that is sometimes referred to as “cooked,” though it’s far different from the denaturation of proteins entailed by heating.

Other cultures have raw seafood traditions, such as the crudo of Venice, poke of Hawai’i, kinilaw of the Philippines, and sashimi of Japan, a country that has heavily influenced the ceviches and tiraditos of Peru in a mashup of flavors with Japanese cuisine. Today’s ceviches may have also been inspired by the escabeches of Spain, which douse cooked seafood with vinegar and vegetables.

Ceviches are now all the rage in New York City, and we’ve never had so many opportunities to eat them, not only in Mexican restaurants but in contemporary bistros that have adopted internationalized menus. And ceviches have proven a perfect way to enjoy the freshest local seafood. Here is a list of some of the best places to find it.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Kausa

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745 9th Ave
New York, NY 10019
(646) 678-5227
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Peruvian ceviches (or cebiches) differ markedly from Mexican versions withtheir inclusion of lemon or bitter orange instead of lime juice, and the addition of potatoes, hominy, sweet potatoes, or corn on the cob. Kausa is a Hell’s Kitchen restaurant that specializes in Peruvian food, offering seven configurations of ceviche and four of tiradito, a presentation of sliced raw fish bathed in a pungent fruity sauce.

Corn, plantain chips, and purple onions join shrimp and other seafood in an orange fluid in a bowl.
Ceviche mixto at Kausa.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

2. Ruta Oaxaca Mexican Cuisine

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35-03 Broadway
Queens, NY 11106
(929) 349-1228
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Though this restaurant with its strikingly pink outdoor dining structure specializes in Oaxacan cuisine, the beach theme alone is enough reason to order a ceviche or two. Luckily, founder Jose Castillo Reyes delivers on that promise. One ceviche features shrimp and squid, and crushed red chiles make it spicier than ceviches in Mexican restaurants often are, while heirloom cherry tomatoes add sweetness.

Pale shrimp and squid rings snowed with crushed red pepper with red and yellow cherry tomatoes here and there.
Ceviche at Ruta Oaxaca.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

3. El Submarino

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8805 Roosevelt Ave
Queens, NY 11372
(718) 685-2780
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Open one year ago on Jackson Heights’s main drag, El Submarino — with a playful logo of a submarine with handlebar moustache — is one of the first Mexican restaurants to specialize in ceviches. In addition to those made with fish, shrimp, and octopus, or a mixture, the ceviche here is also served on tostadas, and aguachiles, which are a larger, soupier versions originating in Sinaloa, the home state of chef Alonso Guzman.

A black volcanic stone bowl with shrimp and avocado inside.
El Submarino’s black shrimp aguachile contains soy sauce and is served in a volcanic stone molcajete.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

4. Los Mariscos

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409 W 15th St
New York, NY 10011
(212) 920-4986
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Diverse aguachiles, ceviches mounted on tostadas, and seafood cocktails are on the agenda of this offshoot of Los Tacos No. 1 located in Chelsea Market (with a special door from the outside, so you don’t have to enter the complex). Seafood used in various configuration of these dishes runs to shrimp, fish, squid, octopus, and scallops, and Los Mariscos is a great place to quickly order a dish of ceviche without enduring a sit-down restaurant.

A mix of diced seafood on a stiff tortilla platform with avocado on top.
Ceviche mixto tostada at Los Mariscos.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

5. Tacos Güey

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37 W 19th St
New York, NY 10011
(212) 991-8222
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Chef Henry Zamora draws inspiration from the Mexican food of his early upbringing in California’s Salinas Valley, concentrating on exquisitely turned out tacos and ceviches. The latter run to about a half dozen varieties of ceviche — some regular, others novel. There’s a scallop aguachile in a greenish oil tasting of mint and Australian finger limes, and a cooked surf clam escabeche that takes ceviches back to its origins in Spain.

A heap of fish cubes with green leaves sticking out and small orange swatches of gooseberry.
Sea bass ceviche at Tacos Guey
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

6. Sona

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36 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003

The ability of the ceviche formula to adapt to different cultures is sometimes amazing. Witness this wonderful Indian take on ceviche at Sona from chef Hari Nayak, which features raw pink snapper in a pink broth composed of coconut milk and kokum, which imparts a striking color and tartness.

An asymmetrical streaky bowl with a creamy pink fluid and hillock of grayish diced fish.
Pink snapper ceviche at Sona.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

7. Panca

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92 7th Ave S
New York, NY 10014
(212) 488-3900
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West Village residents know to fill the seats at this Peruvian restaurant’s indoor and outdoor dining spaces for fresh ceviches and tiraditos. There are a couple of ceviche options but folks are most often getting the clasico — made here with fluke, sweet potato, choclo (fat white Peruvian corn kernels), red onion, and spicy leche de tigre. For those who just want a taste, Panca offers a ceviche shot which is the clasico served in two or three bites.

8. The Leroy House

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430 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014
(646) 590-0640
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Demonstrating how bistros — especially those that partly concentrate on seafood — have clasped ceviche to their bosoms, Leroy House in the West Village via chef David Werner offers a lively sea bass ceviche that makes an excellent appetizer, where the chunks of fish are interspersed with avocado and fresh serrano peppers, making it spicy in a restrained sort of way. But the signal achievement of this West Village restaurant lies in furnishing the ceviche with freshly fried potato chips rather than tostadas, perfect for dipping and adding an extra level of saltiness.

A hand reaches down to scoop up a spoonful of ceviche, with potato chips in a cup at the side.
Sea bass ceviche at Leroy House
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

9. Oxomoco

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Read Review |
128 Greenpoint Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11222
(646) 688-4180
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Though nominally concentrating on the food of Oaxaca, with lots of invented and modified Mexican recipes thrown in, Oxomoco always has a ceviche or two on its menu, usually mounted on tostadas. Most recently it was soy-marinated raw tuna pounded and placed on a tostada, with an intense salsa macha — a current fad around town — spread over the top, and altogether one of the best uses of raw tuna in any kind of restaurant.

A crisp tortilla with a layer of liquid red and above that a layer of black with seeds sticking out.
Tuna ceviche tostada at Oxomoco.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

10. Don Ceviche

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88 Essex St Stall 11
New York, NY 10002
(646) 484-5527
Visit Website

“Mr. Ceviche” is a Peruvian counter founded by Lenin Costas in the Essex Market, turning out more Peruvian specialties in a small space than seems possible — and rotisserie chickens, too. The place offers a pair of ceviches, one a leche de tigre (”tiger’s milk”) — mixed seafood immersed in a sour broth that is intended to be drunk afterwards, said to have aphrodisiacal properties. The toasted corn called cancha adds crunch.

A clear plastic cup filled with shrimp and corn nuts in an orange fluid.
Leche de tigre at Don Ceviche.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

11. Palomas BK

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1 Knickerbocker Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11237
(718) 576-3022
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Owner and chef Fabiola Maldonado has made aguachiles an important focus of her menu at Palomas BK. One dish features scallops with cucumbers and avocado in an intense lime broth, which only makes the raw shellfish, which turns an opaque white, sweeter than if it were fried or grilled. For vegetarians, there’s a version featuring crunchy jicama that develops its own interesting qualities when soaked in the soup, though it poses the question: Can you have a ceviche without any actual seafood?

A bowl of greenish ceviche with a tortilla chip sticking up on the edge.
Scallop aguachile at Palomas BK.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

12. Falansai

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112 Harrison Pl
Brooklyn, NY 11237
(718) 381-0980
Visit Website

Chef Eric Tran dips into the Mexican side of his combined Vietnamese-Mexican heritage to come up with a spectacular ceviche on his innovative menu. On a recent occasion, it was in-season tilefish that was diced up and paired with sliced avocado, and served with tostadas and a freshly made orange hot sauce much like that served with Peruvian ceviches — it all packs quite a punch.

A black bowl with white cubes of fish and slivers of avocado in a milky fluid.
Tilefish ceviche at Falansai.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

13. Colonia Verde

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219 Dekalb Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11205
(347) 689-4287
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Felipe Donnelly’s menu at this romantic Fort Greene restaurant manages to capture many iconic dishes from countries across Central and South America. In a nod to Peru, there’s s a trout ceviche. You wont find the addition of corn or sweet potatoes in this version, but trust that the classic punch from the citrus and aji-spiked leche de tigre is all there. It’s best paired with a few mezcal sips or glass of wine selected by sommelier and Donnelly’s wife Tamy Rofe.

14. La Valentina

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186 Broadway
Long Branch, NJ 07740
(732) 222-5521
Visit Website

New York City should be jealous of the range and excellence of New Jersey’s Mexican restaurants and La Valentina in Long Branch is a case in point. Occupying a former department store on the main drag, with a supermarket in front and charming, cave-like restaurant in back, the menu is mind-boggling in its range of southern and northern Mexican dishes. The aguachile verde is served in typical fashion, diced shrimp and cucumber in a fiery and drinkable green marinade served with soda crackers and avocado in a beer schooner.

A beer glass filled with thick green liquid, with individually wrapped soda crackers on the side.
Aguachile verde at La Valentina.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

1. Kausa

745 9th Ave, New York, NY 10019
Corn, plantain chips, and purple onions join shrimp and other seafood in an orange fluid in a bowl.
Ceviche mixto at Kausa.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Peruvian ceviches (or cebiches) differ markedly from Mexican versions withtheir inclusion of lemon or bitter orange instead of lime juice, and the addition of potatoes, hominy, sweet potatoes, or corn on the cob. Kausa is a Hell’s Kitchen restaurant that specializes in Peruvian food, offering seven configurations of ceviche and four of tiradito, a presentation of sliced raw fish bathed in a pungent fruity sauce.

745 9th Ave
New York, NY 10019

2. Ruta Oaxaca Mexican Cuisine

35-03 Broadway, Queens, NY 11106
Pale shrimp and squid rings snowed with crushed red pepper with red and yellow cherry tomatoes here and there.
Ceviche at Ruta Oaxaca.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Though this restaurant with its strikingly pink outdoor dining structure specializes in Oaxacan cuisine, the beach theme alone is enough reason to order a ceviche or two. Luckily, founder Jose Castillo Reyes delivers on that promise. One ceviche features shrimp and squid, and crushed red chiles make it spicier than ceviches in Mexican restaurants often are, while heirloom cherry tomatoes add sweetness.

35-03 Broadway
Queens, NY 11106

3. El Submarino

8805 Roosevelt Ave, Queens, NY 11372
A black volcanic stone bowl with shrimp and avocado inside.
El Submarino’s black shrimp aguachile contains soy sauce and is served in a volcanic stone molcajete.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Open one year ago on Jackson Heights’s main drag, El Submarino — with a playful logo of a submarine with handlebar moustache — is one of the first Mexican restaurants to specialize in ceviches. In addition to those made with fish, shrimp, and octopus, or a mixture, the ceviche here is also served on tostadas, and aguachiles, which are a larger, soupier versions originating in Sinaloa, the home state of chef Alonso Guzman.

8805 Roosevelt Ave
Queens, NY 11372

4. Los Mariscos

409 W 15th St, New York, NY 10011
A mix of diced seafood on a stiff tortilla platform with avocado on top.
Ceviche mixto tostada at Los Mariscos.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Diverse aguachiles, ceviches mounted on tostadas, and seafood cocktails are on the agenda of this offshoot of Los Tacos No. 1 located in Chelsea Market (with a special door from the outside, so you don’t have to enter the complex). Seafood used in various configuration of these dishes runs to shrimp, fish, squid, octopus, and scallops, and Los Mariscos is a great place to quickly order a dish of ceviche without enduring a sit-down restaurant.

409 W 15th St
New York, NY 10011

5. Tacos Güey

37 W 19th St, New York, NY 10011
A heap of fish cubes with green leaves sticking out and small orange swatches of gooseberry.
Sea bass ceviche at Tacos Guey
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Chef Henry Zamora draws inspiration from the Mexican food of his early upbringing in California’s Salinas Valley, concentrating on exquisitely turned out tacos and ceviches. The latter run to about a half dozen varieties of ceviche — some regular, others novel. There’s a scallop aguachile in a greenish oil tasting of mint and Australian finger limes, and a cooked surf clam escabeche that takes ceviches back to its origins in Spain.

37 W 19th St
New York, NY 10011

6. Sona

36 E 20th St, New York, NY 10003
An asymmetrical streaky bowl with a creamy pink fluid and hillock of grayish diced fish.
Pink snapper ceviche at Sona.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The ability of the ceviche formula to adapt to different cultures is sometimes amazing. Witness this wonderful Indian take on ceviche at Sona from chef Hari Nayak, which features raw pink snapper in a pink broth composed of coconut milk and kokum, which imparts a striking color and tartness.

36 E 20th St
New York, NY 10003

7. Panca

92 7th Ave S, New York, NY 10014

West Village residents know to fill the seats at this Peruvian restaurant’s indoor and outdoor dining spaces for fresh ceviches and tiraditos. There are a couple of ceviche options but folks are most often getting the clasico — made here with fluke, sweet potato, choclo (fat white Peruvian corn kernels), red onion, and spicy leche de tigre. For those who just want a taste, Panca offers a ceviche shot which is the clasico served in two or three bites.

92 7th Ave S
New York, NY 10014

8. The Leroy House

430 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014
A hand reaches down to scoop up a spoonful of ceviche, with potato chips in a cup at the side.
Sea bass ceviche at Leroy House
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Demonstrating how bistros — especially those that partly concentrate on seafood — have clasped ceviche to their bosoms, Leroy House in the West Village via chef David Werner offers a lively sea bass ceviche that makes an excellent appetizer, where the chunks of fish are interspersed with avocado and fresh serrano peppers, making it spicy in a restrained sort of way. But the signal achievement of this West Village restaurant lies in furnishing the ceviche with freshly fried potato chips rather than tostadas, perfect for dipping and adding an extra level of saltiness.

430 Hudson St
New York, NY 10014

9. Oxomoco

128 Greenpoint Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11222
Read Review |
A crisp tortilla with a layer of liquid red and above that a layer of black with seeds sticking out.
Tuna ceviche tostada at Oxomoco.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Though nominally concentrating on the food of Oaxaca, with lots of invented and modified Mexican recipes thrown in, Oxomoco always has a ceviche or two on its menu, usually mounted on tostadas. Most recently it was soy-marinated raw tuna pounded and placed on a tostada, with an intense salsa macha — a current fad around town — spread over the top, and altogether one of the best uses of raw tuna in any kind of restaurant.

128 Greenpoint Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11222

10. Don Ceviche

88 Essex St Stall 11, New York, NY 10002
A clear plastic cup filled with shrimp and corn nuts in an orange fluid.
Leche de tigre at Don Ceviche.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

“Mr. Ceviche” is a Peruvian counter founded by Lenin Costas in the Essex Market, turning out more Peruvian specialties in a small space than seems possible — and rotisserie chickens, too. The place offers a pair of ceviches, one a leche de tigre (”tiger’s milk”) — mixed seafood immersed in a sour broth that is intended to be drunk afterwards, said to have aphrodisiacal properties. The toasted corn called cancha adds crunch.

88 Essex St Stall 11
New York, NY 10002

11. Palomas BK

1 Knickerbocker Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11237
A bowl of greenish ceviche with a tortilla chip sticking up on the edge.
Scallop aguachile at Palomas BK.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Owner and chef Fabiola Maldonado has made aguachiles an important focus of her menu at Palomas BK. One dish features scallops with cucumbers and avocado in an intense lime broth, which only makes the raw shellfish, which turns an opaque white, sweeter than if it were fried or grilled. For vegetarians, there’s a version featuring crunchy jicama that develops its own interesting qualities when soaked in the soup, though it poses the question: Can you have a ceviche without any actual seafood?

1 Knickerbocker Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11237

12. Falansai

112 Harrison Pl, Brooklyn, NY 11237
A black bowl with white cubes of fish and slivers of avocado in a milky fluid.
Tilefish ceviche at Falansai.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Chef Eric Tran dips into the Mexican side of his combined Vietnamese-Mexican heritage to come up with a spectacular ceviche on his innovative menu. On a recent occasion, it was in-season tilefish that was diced up and paired with sliced avocado, and served with tostadas and a freshly made orange hot sauce much like that served with Peruvian ceviches — it all packs quite a punch.

112 Harrison Pl
Brooklyn, NY 11237

13. Colonia Verde

219 Dekalb Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11205

Felipe Donnelly’s menu at this romantic Fort Greene restaurant manages to capture many iconic dishes from countries across Central and South America. In a nod to Peru, there’s s a trout ceviche. You wont find the addition of corn or sweet potatoes in this version, but trust that the classic punch from the citrus and aji-spiked leche de tigre is all there. It’s best paired with a few mezcal sips or glass of wine selected by sommelier and Donnelly’s wife Tamy Rofe.

219 Dekalb Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11205

14. La Valentina

186 Broadway, Long Branch, NJ 07740
A beer glass filled with thick green liquid, with individually wrapped soda crackers on the side.
Aguachile verde at La Valentina.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

New York City should be jealous of the range and excellence of New Jersey’s Mexican restaurants and La Valentina in Long Branch is a case in point. Occupying a former department store on the main drag, with a supermarket in front and charming, cave-like restaurant in back, the menu is mind-boggling in its range of southern and northern Mexican dishes. The aguachile verde is served in typical fashion, diced shrimp and cucumber in a fiery and drinkable green marinade served with soda crackers and avocado in a beer schooner.

186 Broadway
Long Branch, NJ 07740

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