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15 Top NYC Restaurants Where You Can BYOB

Bring your own beer, wine, and sake to one of these gems

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New York City is filled with impressive wine lists curated by thoughtful sommeliers and beverage directors. But there are also plenty of exciting restaurants that welcome “outside bottles” of wine and beer at no cost. Here are 15 restaurants that allow guests to bring their own bottle, most of which are as casual and inviting as their policies. If a wine or beer pairing is particularly ideal, it is noted here.

Note: This is an updated version of a map originally published in 2017.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Tanoshi Sushi Sake Bar

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1372 York Ave
New York, NY 10021
(917) 265-8254
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Sake is the natural choice for a sushi pairing, and Upper East Side omakase hideout Tanoshi lets diners bring their own — but if there happens to be a bottle of Champagne or sparkling wine around the house, bring it. These typically do well with vinegar-seasoned rice and work with delicate seafood. The restaurant will also provide an ice bucket to keep bottles cool and close by.

325 W 57th St
New York, NY 10019
(212) 969-1782
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Aba regulars urge that the food at the Hell’s Kitchen Turkish restaurant is wonderfully similar to what’s found in Turkey, and that the atmosphere is welcoming and sometimes loud, but always fun. Menu standouts include the lebni, kebabs, falafel, and anything lamb. It’s no charge for bringing wine, and dry whites or full-bodied reds would be easy choices. An ice bucket will arrive before you even ask.

A warmly lit dining room with tables along the walls Aba [Official Photo]

3. Wondee Siam

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792 9th Ave
New York, NY 10019
(212) 459-9057

Post renovation, the Hell’s Kitchen Thai restaurant is a newly lovely space in the neighborhood. And graciously, it welcomes outside bottles. Off-dry rieslings from the Mosel or Finger Lakes are easy pairings; same goes for gewürztraminer and chenin blanc.

4. Astoria Seafood

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3710 33rd St
Long Island City, NY 11101
(718) 392-2680
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The worst kept secret among BYO-goers, Astoria Seafood is all charm and warmth in a space that isn’t trying for either. It’s a seafood market, where customers first grab all the mussels, shrimp, whole red snappers, and squid they want. Staff charges by the pound and asks how diners want each selection cooked, while not so subtly making recommendations. Bring a muscatel for all the prawns, a picpoul de pinet, or an albariño and cava from Spain; definitely order a Greek salad. Be prepared to drink out of plastic.

5. Bhatti Indian Grill

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100 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10010
(212) 683-4228
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Gramercy Indian restaurant Bhatti enforces a one-bottle-per-table maximum, and does not allow beer, so focus on bringing along a spätlese riesling, or a medium-dry vouvray, or just anything with a moderate amount of residual sugar. Do avoid California cabernet sauvignon and barolo, and definitely get the lamb vindaloo.

A dining room with windows in the background Bhatti [Official Photo]

6. Tartine

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253 W 11th St
New York, NY 10014
(212) 229-2611
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This little West Village charmer has been serving packed brunches for years, but dinner here is more worthy of a visit. The menu has plenty of French bistro basics like steak au poivre and buttery escargot, which can be paired with a cabernet sauvignon from Bordeaux and chardonnay from Burgundy, respectively. Cash only.

A full dining room with windows in the background Tartine [Official Photo]

7. Taste of Samarkand

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62-16 Woodhaven Blvd
Middle Village, NY 11379
(718) 672-2121
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Very fine salads and spreads from Uzbekistan have made this Middle Village, Queens restaurant a destination since opening in 2015. Even better are the skewers, the standout among them the juicy beef. The Uzbek restaurant is true to simplicity, and droves of large groups are there to revel in it. Bring some syrah blends or Chateauneuf du Pape for all those kebabs, and an extra brut Champagne to go with all the many flakey, buttery breads available.

Taste of Samarkand Patty Diez/Eater

8. Panna II Garden

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93 1st Avenue #2
New York, NY 10003
(212) 598-4610
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Large groups file up the stairs to Panna II — most of them celebrating something in the cash-only East Village Indian restaurant — to a room lit by strings of Christmas lights. Grüner veltliner and moderately sweet German rieslings would both be fine pairings.

Men stand on the stoop of a colorful restaurant entrance Robert Sietsema/Eater

9. Casa Adela

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66 Avenue C
New York, NY 10009
(212) 473-1882

Puerto Rican classics like pernil are well-seasoned with garlic, oregano, and pepper, so it’s a good idea to bring some beer (a lager or porter) when trying Casa Adela’s expert version — served with rice and beans. Don’t skip the mofongo, a top version in the city, or the roast chicken — which would do well with Spanish cider. Bringing beer is free, but wine is $5 corkage. No credit cards.

10. Spicy Village

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68 Forsyth St #B
New York, NY 10002
(212) 625-8299
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While Spicy Village isn’t in fact all that spicy, ideal pairings are those that pair well with spicier foods, like a Vouvray for a white wine, and an Italian barbera for red. If bringing along beers, avoid anything too sweet or terribly dark: amber ales and pale ales work well. Note: Spicy Village is BYO with the condition that each guest spends at least $10.

11. Peking Duck House

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28 Mott St # A
New York, NY 10013
(212) 227-1810
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A meal at Chinatown classic Peking Duck House is part theater, part full-blown feast, where whole ducks with ultra-crisp skins are carved tableside. Visit with a group and several bottles of wine in tow. Consider pairings like northern Rhône syrah or dry, German riesling. Surrounding tables will be filled with the city’s sommeliers.

12. Wu's Wonton King

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165 E Broadway
New York, NY 10002
(212) 477-1111
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Though only a couple of years old, Cantonese Wu’s is the old-school-style counterpoint to the restaurants that surround it on the Lower East Side. The crispy garlic chicken and golden fried rice are famous here, as is the peking duck — served on soft buns instead of thin wrappers. A sleeper is the fluffy barbecue buns, packed and plump from the slightly sweet barbecue pork filling. Pack savagnins, chenin blancs, and semillons; and a medium-bodied fruity red for those barbecued meats. The New York wine crowd rotates heavily between Peking and Wu’s.

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13. Los Hermanos

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271 Starr St
Brooklyn, NY 11237
(718) 456-3422

Los Hermanos in Bushwick is part taqueria and part tortilla factory, where outside wine and beer is most welcome. There are no cups or glasses so definitely bring those, too, or stick to bottles like Pacifico and Tecate. If wine is a must, something with ripe green fruit and a little bit of acid would go a long way.

14. Nicandra's

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264 Irving Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11237
(718) 381-2699
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Bushwick native Taco Tapia is giving the neighborhood exactly the Italian food it wants: housemade pasta that’s warming, affordable, and familiar. All of the pastas are smart choices, heightened when there’s a skin contact wine (for seafood pastas) or a zinfandel (for tomato-based pastas) in tow. The space is unfussy, the staff helpful. Note that Nicandra’s is closed Monday’s.

15. Lucali

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575 Henry St
Brooklyn, NY 11231
(718) 858-4086
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Over a decade in, Lucali still pulls in long lines for its fine pizza and calzones in a wonderfully cozy space. It’s a restaurant that believes in few frills, where servers greet tables with ease and a wine key, and the menu boasts no more than five options. Since Lucali only does red pies, focus on red wines like a nebbiolo from the Langhe or a cabernet franc that’s blissful with meat toppings. Bring wine glasses— and the wine and its desired temperature — and arrive before 5 p.m. for a chance at snagging a table. Note that the restaurant only allows one bottle of wine per five people to speed things along.

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1. Tanoshi Sushi Sake Bar

1372 York Ave, New York, NY 10021

Sake is the natural choice for a sushi pairing, and Upper East Side omakase hideout Tanoshi lets diners bring their own — but if there happens to be a bottle of Champagne or sparkling wine around the house, bring it. These typically do well with vinegar-seasoned rice and work with delicate seafood. The restaurant will also provide an ice bucket to keep bottles cool and close by.

1372 York Ave
New York, NY 10021

2. Aba

325 W 57th St, New York, NY 10019
A warmly lit dining room with tables along the walls Aba [Official Photo]

Aba regulars urge that the food at the Hell’s Kitchen Turkish restaurant is wonderfully similar to what’s found in Turkey, and that the atmosphere is welcoming and sometimes loud, but always fun. Menu standouts include the lebni, kebabs, falafel, and anything lamb. It’s no charge for bringing wine, and dry whites or full-bodied reds would be easy choices. An ice bucket will arrive before you even ask.

325 W 57th St
New York, NY 10019

3. Wondee Siam

792 9th Ave, New York, NY 10019

Post renovation, the Hell’s Kitchen Thai restaurant is a newly lovely space in the neighborhood. And graciously, it welcomes outside bottles. Off-dry rieslings from the Mosel or Finger Lakes are easy pairings; same goes for gewürztraminer and chenin blanc.

792 9th Ave
New York, NY 10019

4. Astoria Seafood

3710 33rd St, Long Island City, NY 11101

The worst kept secret among BYO-goers, Astoria Seafood is all charm and warmth in a space that isn’t trying for either. It’s a seafood market, where customers first grab all the mussels, shrimp, whole red snappers, and squid they want. Staff charges by the pound and asks how diners want each selection cooked, while not so subtly making recommendations. Bring a muscatel for all the prawns, a picpoul de pinet, or an albariño and cava from Spain; definitely order a Greek salad. Be prepared to drink out of plastic.

3710 33rd St
Long Island City, NY 11101

5. Bhatti Indian Grill

100 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010
A dining room with windows in the background Bhatti [Official Photo]

Gramercy Indian restaurant Bhatti enforces a one-bottle-per-table maximum, and does not allow beer, so focus on bringing along a spätlese riesling, or a medium-dry vouvray, or just anything with a moderate amount of residual sugar. Do avoid California cabernet sauvignon and barolo, and definitely get the lamb vindaloo.

100 Lexington Ave
New York, NY 10010

6. Tartine

253 W 11th St, New York, NY 10014
A full dining room with windows in the background Tartine [Official Photo]

This little West Village charmer has been serving packed brunches for years, but dinner here is more worthy of a visit. The menu has plenty of French bistro basics like steak au poivre and buttery escargot, which can be paired with a cabernet sauvignon from Bordeaux and chardonnay from Burgundy, respectively. Cash only.

253 W 11th St
New York, NY 10014

7. Taste of Samarkand

62-16 Woodhaven Blvd, Middle Village, NY 11379
Taste of Samarkand Patty Diez/Eater

Very fine salads and spreads from Uzbekistan have made this Middle Village, Queens restaurant a destination since opening in 2015. Even better are the skewers, the standout among them the juicy beef. The Uzbek restaurant is true to simplicity, and droves of large groups are there to revel in it. Bring some syrah blends or Chateauneuf du Pape for all those kebabs, and an extra brut Champagne to go with all the many flakey, buttery breads available.

62-16 Woodhaven Blvd
Middle Village, NY 11379

8. Panna II Garden

93 1st Avenue #2, New York, NY 10003
Men stand on the stoop of a colorful restaurant entrance Robert Sietsema/Eater

Large groups file up the stairs to Panna II — most of them celebrating something in the cash-only East Village Indian restaurant — to a room lit by strings of Christmas lights. Grüner veltliner and moderately sweet German rieslings would both be fine pairings.

93 1st Avenue #2
New York, NY 10003

9. Casa Adela

66 Avenue C, New York, NY 10009

Puerto Rican classics like pernil are well-seasoned with garlic, oregano, and pepper, so it’s a good idea to bring some beer (a lager or porter) when trying Casa Adela’s expert version — served with rice and beans. Don’t skip the mofongo, a top version in the city, or the roast chicken — which would do well with Spanish cider. Bringing beer is free, but wine is $5 corkage. No credit cards.

66 Avenue C
New York, NY 10009

10. Spicy Village

68 Forsyth St #B, New York, NY 10002

While Spicy Village isn’t in fact all that spicy, ideal pairings are those that pair well with spicier foods, like a Vouvray for a white wine, and an Italian barbera for red. If bringing along beers, avoid anything too sweet or terribly dark: amber ales and pale ales work well. Note: Spicy Village is BYO with the condition that each guest spends at least $10.

68 Forsyth St #B
New York, NY 10002

11. Peking Duck House

28 Mott St # A, New York, NY 10013

A meal at Chinatown classic Peking Duck House is part theater, part full-blown feast, where whole ducks with ultra-crisp skins are carved tableside. Visit with a group and several bottles of wine in tow. Consider pairings like northern Rhône syrah or dry, German riesling. Surrounding tables will be filled with the city’s sommeliers.

28 Mott St # A
New York, NY 10013

12. Wu's Wonton King

165 E Broadway, New York, NY 10002

Though only a couple of years old, Cantonese Wu’s is the old-school-style counterpoint to the restaurants that surround it on the Lower East Side. The crispy garlic chicken and golden fried rice are famous here, as is the peking duck — served on soft buns instead of thin wrappers. A sleeper is the fluffy barbecue buns, packed and plump from the slightly sweet barbecue pork filling. Pack savagnins, chenin blancs, and semillons; and a medium-bodied fruity red for those barbecued meats. The New York wine crowd rotates heavily between Peking and Wu’s.

165 E Broadway
New York, NY 10002

13. Los Hermanos

271 Starr St, Brooklyn, NY 11237

Los Hermanos in Bushwick is part taqueria and part tortilla factory, where outside wine and beer is most welcome. There are no cups or glasses so definitely bring those, too, or stick to bottles like Pacifico and Tecate. If wine is a must, something with ripe green fruit and a little bit of acid would go a long way.

271 Starr St
Brooklyn, NY 11237

14. Nicandra's

264 Irving Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11237

Bushwick native Taco Tapia is giving the neighborhood exactly the Italian food it wants: housemade pasta that’s warming, affordable, and familiar. All of the pastas are smart choices, heightened when there’s a skin contact wine (for seafood pastas) or a zinfandel (for tomato-based pastas) in tow. The space is unfussy, the staff helpful. Note that Nicandra’s is closed Monday’s.

264 Irving Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11237

15. Lucali

575 Henry St, Brooklyn, NY 11231

Over a decade in, Lucali still pulls in long lines for its fine pizza and calzones in a wonderfully cozy space. It’s a restaurant that believes in few frills, where servers greet tables with ease and a wine key, and the menu boasts no more than five options. Since Lucali only does red pies, focus on red wines like a nebbiolo from the Langhe or a cabernet franc that’s blissful with meat toppings. Bring wine glasses— and the wine and its desired temperature — and arrive before 5 p.m. for a chance at snagging a table. Note that the restaurant only allows one bottle of wine per five people to speed things along.

575 Henry St
Brooklyn, NY 11231

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