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Pastries, Jerusalem bagel sandwiches, and more at K’Far in Williamsburg.
A spread from K’Far in Williamsburg.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

The Best Brunch Spots in New York City

Eggs, breakfast sandwiches, pastries, and unlimited coffee

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A spread from K’Far in Williamsburg.
| Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

When it comes to brunch, a meal that can require two extra-strength Advil, the last thing anyone needs is a fight about where to eat. There are endless brunch options in the five boroughs, and while most are serving dry pancakes and $20 fried chicken sandwiches, a handful rise above the rest. Our favorite places to eat brunch in the city serve unlimited coffee, runny eggs, breakfast sandwiches, bagels and lox, or dim sum.

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Melba's

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Chicken and eggnog waffles are one of the signatures of this Harlem destination. Owner Melba Wilson uses recipes from her grandmother that date back to the 1930s and earned her the win on Bobby Flay’s cooking show years back.

Old John's Luncheonette

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Old John’s was opened for 70 years, before being saved and relaunched in January 2021. The spot keeps charming, nostalgic elements while updating the space and menu. For brunch, find several omelets, turkey clubs, breakfast burgers, and bloody marys.

Two people stand behind the counter of a bar with blue stools and place settings at each stool
Old John’s Luncheonette on the Upper West Side.
Molly Tavoletti / Eater NY

EJ's Luncheonette

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Upper Eastsiders know there’s no more comforting weekend option than a meal at EJ’s. This newfangled luncheonette has a lengthy menu with something for everyone to choose: stacked sandwiches, pancakes, waffles, and eggs. There’s plenty of seating, which means there’s a good bet you’ll get one.

Dawa’s

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Dawa’s is a Himalayan American restaurant in Woodside, Queens, that serves brunch classics (like french toast) alongside momos and thenthuk, a Tibetan noodle dish. The wide-reaching menu makes Dawa’s a standout brunch option in the area, with something for every mood.

A storefront in white that reads “Dawa’s.”
Dawa’s in Woodside.
Dawa’s

Cafe Chelsea

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Sceney Cafe Chelsea offers brunch Saturdays and Sundays from 11 to 3:30 p.m., with variations on seafood towers ($24 to $155), a Florentine omelet, salads, burgers, and sandwiches on gluten-free bread. Brunch is all about the drinks, of course, which includes cocktails like a vesper, le flaneur, booze-free options, or the French-focused wine list.

The bar at Café Chelsea, a new restaurant at the Chelsea Hotel.
The bar at Café Chelsea, a restaurant at the Chelsea Hotel.
Annie Schlechter/Café Chelsea

Mark's Off Madison

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One of Pete Wells’s 100 Best Restaurants for 2023, this Midtown spot from chef Mark Strausman, formerly of Freds at Barneys New York and Campagna restaurants, offers crowd pleasers in a just-right space that’s neither too casual nor too swanky. Choose from a selection of bagels and bialys, banana challah French toast, a Roumanian steak sandwich, a Reuben, and more.

A handsome dining room. Beth Landman/Eater NY

The Commerce Inn

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This Shaker-inspired restaurant from the same team behind Buvette is easier to get into around brunch hours. Simple, but soulful dishes like curried rice; soft-boiled eggs; smoked cod; duck hash; and a bloody mary with oxtail broth make it one of the more cozy options for brunch in the winter.

Lingo is a new Japanese American restaurant in Greenpoint that’s mostly flown under the radar since opening in April. Its owner, Emily Yuen, used to run the kitchen at Bessou, a popular Japanese restaurant that specialized in comfort foods. It shows during weekend brunch when the chef serves a separate menu of rib-sticking dishes like Spam eggs Benedict and yuzu ricotta pancakes.

A collection of dishes on a table from Lingo.
A collection of dishes from Lingo.
Andrew Bui/Lingo

Three Decker Diner

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Three Decker Diner has been open in Greenpoint since 1945, but it recently changed owners. Gavin Compton, the owner of Variety Coffee Roasters, and Eduardo Sandoval, behind the Blue Collar burger chain, are now steering the ship. The food has improved and the prices are fair: disco fries, fajitas, hard shell tacos, chicken Caesar wraps, wings, pancakes, and waffles are all available around the clock, usually for around $10. Unlimited coffee from Variety costs a few dollars.

An overhead photograph, taken with flash, of an order of pancakes at Three Decker Diner.
Pancakes at Three Decker Diner.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Lure Fishbar

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True to its reputation as a seafood spot, lots of fish preparations are available at Lure’s brunch, though fewer than at its dinner service, including a smoked salmon tower, its signature sushi with toasted rice, a lobster roll, and full plate fish-filet entrees. Other brunch selections are mainly standards: four kinds of eggs Benedict, a burger, Caesar salad, and mushroom omelet. And elbowing its way onto the menu is a dim sum service consisting of four plates, half presented in bamboo steamers. All are worth ordering.

The interior of a restaurant full of people looks like the inside of a boat.
The dining room at Lure Fishbar.
Mercer Hospitality

Looking for something crowd-pleasing, pretty, and satisfying — that you can get into without a reservation? Head to K’Far. The Philadelphia restaurant opened in Williamsburg about a year ago. The menu has pistachio sticky buns, lemon cheesecake babka, and flattened bagel sandwiches to snack on, plus bigger items like shakshuka and latkes with fried eggs. There are 150 seats between the dining room and atrium, meaning it’s almost always possible to get a table at brunch.

Pastries, Jerusalem bagel sandwiches, and more at K’Far in Williamsburg.
Brunch at K’Far.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Thai Diner

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Breakfast is served until 4 p.m. at Thai Diner, making it perfect for a last-minute brunch. The breakfast sandwich — egg, cheese, sausage, and Thai basil wrapped in a roti — is one of the best in town, and the Thai tea babka french toast comes with sides of condensed milk for dunking.

An oval shaped plate of food with sunny side up eggs, thinly sliced steak, a bowl with white rice, and bowl with an orange sauce
Steak and eggs at Thai Diner.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

Casa Carmen Tribeca

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Casa Carmen is named after Carmen Ramírez Degollado — known as Titita — an 84-year-old Mexico City restaurateur who runs one of the most recognized restaurants in Mexico City, what started as El Bajio and has become a chain. She was born in Xalapa, the inland capital of Veracruz state and is celebrated for her labor-intensive homestyle regional cooking. Brunch items include ceviche verde, a menu section of tacos, chilaquiles, corn pancakes, and enmoladas xico.

Inside Casa Carmen.
Inside Casa Carmen.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Chang Lai Fishballs Noodles

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On the same block where people line up for a taste of Mei Lai Wah’s famous pork buns lies a brunch option where there’s no wait. Chang Lai Fishballs Noodles, originally a locally beloved food cart, relocated to this permanent takeout spot this summer — and it's been a morning staple for us ever since. There are just a couple of counter stools here but it's well worth your time and wallet. Go for the $5.75 curry fishballs over rice noodles and ask for all the sauces.

A container of rice noodles with curry fishballs.
Curry fishballs with rice noodles.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

House of Joy

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House of Joy is one of the largest dim sum parlors in Manhattan’s Chinatown and one of the few restaurants in the area that still delivers its dim sum on carts. Grab a number from the host at the front and wait patiently to be called — which, if you don’t arrive before 11 a.m. on weekends, might be an hour or more. Once inside, plates of rice noodles, pineapple buns, pea shoots, and chicken feet cost a few dollars each, and there’s a full menu of larger meat and seafood dishes.

A custard bun shaped like a pig on a crowded table at a restaurant in Chinatown, House of Joy.
Dim sum at House of Joy.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Golden Diner

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Samuel Yoo, an alum of Momofuku Ko and Major Food Group, opened this throwback diner in Two Bridges in 2019. Years later, it’s still a favorite place for brunch staples like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and fries that are served all day.

A cheeseburger with three pickles on top, plus fries, on a white plate with a striped lining.
The popular burger at Golden Diner.
Adam Moussa/Eater NY

Win Son Bakery

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Pro: Win Son Bakery is home to one of the city’s best breakfast sandwiches — a bacon, egg, and cheese sandwich on a flakey scallion pancake. Con: Everyone already knows this, and the lines on weekend mornings often stretch out the door. First-timers, don’t be scared: The sandwich is worth it, and there’s lots of seating throughout the restaurant.

Two hands holding a folded scallion pancake egg and bacon sandwich.
The bacon, egg, and cheese scallion pancake at Win Son Bakery.
Gary He/Eater NY

Salty Lunch Lady's Little Luncheonette

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Open on the weekends starting at 11:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. this Ridgewood newcomer is a charming spot to saddle up to one of the bar stools or tables and start your morning off with a sandwich and pie slice (think nostalgic, rotating options like banana cream). It’s an easygoing, order-at-the-counter sort of vibe where it's pretty guaranteed you’ll get a seat.

A sandwich topped with pickles at Salty Lunch Lady’s Little Luncheonette.
A sandwich at Salty Lunch Lady’s Little Luncheonette.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Colonia Verde

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The best type of brunch in our opinion, is a dish that gives you a little taste of all the fixins. Colonia Verde’s sausage and veggie parrillada fits the bill: a giant platter of several types of sausages, veggies, dipping sauces, queso fundido, and arepas. The breakfast tacos, as well as the duck fried rice, are also great options as well. There’s plenty of seating in the back for groups.

Sausages, veggies, queso fundido, and arepas.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Peaches Restaurant

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This popular Bed-Stuy restaurant has a brunch menu with fried chicken, seafood, and Southern sides. The steak with eggs, chicken with toast, and catfish with grits are all reliable, and a larger menu with crab cake sandwiches and shrimp po’ boys is served all day. There are other locations around Brooklyn.

Three pieces of flakey, fried chicken rest in a red-and-white checkered napkin in a takeout basket.
A basket of fried chicken from Peaches Hot House.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

Melba's

Chicken and eggnog waffles are one of the signatures of this Harlem destination. Owner Melba Wilson uses recipes from her grandmother that date back to the 1930s and earned her the win on Bobby Flay’s cooking show years back.

Old John's Luncheonette

Old John’s was opened for 70 years, before being saved and relaunched in January 2021. The spot keeps charming, nostalgic elements while updating the space and menu. For brunch, find several omelets, turkey clubs, breakfast burgers, and bloody marys.

Two people stand behind the counter of a bar with blue stools and place settings at each stool
Old John’s Luncheonette on the Upper West Side.
Molly Tavoletti / Eater NY

EJ's Luncheonette

Upper Eastsiders know there’s no more comforting weekend option than a meal at EJ’s. This newfangled luncheonette has a lengthy menu with something for everyone to choose: stacked sandwiches, pancakes, waffles, and eggs. There’s plenty of seating, which means there’s a good bet you’ll get one.

Dawa’s

Dawa’s is a Himalayan American restaurant in Woodside, Queens, that serves brunch classics (like french toast) alongside momos and thenthuk, a Tibetan noodle dish. The wide-reaching menu makes Dawa’s a standout brunch option in the area, with something for every mood.

A storefront in white that reads “Dawa’s.”
Dawa’s in Woodside.
Dawa’s

Cafe Chelsea

Sceney Cafe Chelsea offers brunch Saturdays and Sundays from 11 to 3:30 p.m., with variations on seafood towers ($24 to $155), a Florentine omelet, salads, burgers, and sandwiches on gluten-free bread. Brunch is all about the drinks, of course, which includes cocktails like a vesper, le flaneur, booze-free options, or the French-focused wine list.

The bar at Café Chelsea, a new restaurant at the Chelsea Hotel.
The bar at Café Chelsea, a restaurant at the Chelsea Hotel.
Annie Schlechter/Café Chelsea

Mark's Off Madison

One of Pete Wells’s 100 Best Restaurants for 2023, this Midtown spot from chef Mark Strausman, formerly of Freds at Barneys New York and Campagna restaurants, offers crowd pleasers in a just-right space that’s neither too casual nor too swanky. Choose from a selection of bagels and bialys, banana challah French toast, a Roumanian steak sandwich, a Reuben, and more.

A handsome dining room. Beth Landman/Eater NY

The Commerce Inn

This Shaker-inspired restaurant from the same team behind Buvette is easier to get into around brunch hours. Simple, but soulful dishes like curried rice; soft-boiled eggs; smoked cod; duck hash; and a bloody mary with oxtail broth make it one of the more cozy options for brunch in the winter.

Lingo

Lingo is a new Japanese American restaurant in Greenpoint that’s mostly flown under the radar since opening in April. Its owner, Emily Yuen, used to run the kitchen at Bessou, a popular Japanese restaurant that specialized in comfort foods. It shows during weekend brunch when the chef serves a separate menu of rib-sticking dishes like Spam eggs Benedict and yuzu ricotta pancakes.

A collection of dishes on a table from Lingo.
A collection of dishes from Lingo.
Andrew Bui/Lingo

Three Decker Diner

Three Decker Diner has been open in Greenpoint since 1945, but it recently changed owners. Gavin Compton, the owner of Variety Coffee Roasters, and Eduardo Sandoval, behind the Blue Collar burger chain, are now steering the ship. The food has improved and the prices are fair: disco fries, fajitas, hard shell tacos, chicken Caesar wraps, wings, pancakes, and waffles are all available around the clock, usually for around $10. Unlimited coffee from Variety costs a few dollars.

An overhead photograph, taken with flash, of an order of pancakes at Three Decker Diner.
Pancakes at Three Decker Diner.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Lure Fishbar

True to its reputation as a seafood spot, lots of fish preparations are available at Lure’s brunch, though fewer than at its dinner service, including a smoked salmon tower, its signature sushi with toasted rice, a lobster roll, and full plate fish-filet entrees. Other brunch selections are mainly standards: four kinds of eggs Benedict, a burger, Caesar salad, and mushroom omelet. And elbowing its way onto the menu is a dim sum service consisting of four plates, half presented in bamboo steamers. All are worth ordering.

The interior of a restaurant full of people looks like the inside of a boat.
The dining room at Lure Fishbar.
Mercer Hospitality

K'Far

Looking for something crowd-pleasing, pretty, and satisfying — that you can get into without a reservation? Head to K’Far. The Philadelphia restaurant opened in Williamsburg about a year ago. The menu has pistachio sticky buns, lemon cheesecake babka, and flattened bagel sandwiches to snack on, plus bigger items like shakshuka and latkes with fried eggs. There are 150 seats between the dining room and atrium, meaning it’s almost always possible to get a table at brunch.

Pastries, Jerusalem bagel sandwiches, and more at K’Far in Williamsburg.
Brunch at K’Far.
Lanna Apisukh/Eater NY

Thai Diner

Breakfast is served until 4 p.m. at Thai Diner, making it perfect for a last-minute brunch. The breakfast sandwich — egg, cheese, sausage, and Thai basil wrapped in a roti — is one of the best in town, and the Thai tea babka french toast comes with sides of condensed milk for dunking.

An oval shaped plate of food with sunny side up eggs, thinly sliced steak, a bowl with white rice, and bowl with an orange sauce
Steak and eggs at Thai Diner.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

Casa Carmen Tribeca

Casa Carmen is named after Carmen Ramírez Degollado — known as Titita — an 84-year-old Mexico City restaurateur who runs one of the most recognized restaurants in Mexico City, what started as El Bajio and has become a chain. She was born in Xalapa, the inland capital of Veracruz state and is celebrated for her labor-intensive homestyle regional cooking. Brunch items include ceviche verde, a menu section of tacos, chilaquiles, corn pancakes, and enmoladas xico.

Inside Casa Carmen.
Inside Casa Carmen.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Chang Lai Fishballs Noodles

On the same block where people line up for a taste of Mei Lai Wah’s famous pork buns lies a brunch option where there’s no wait. Chang Lai Fishballs Noodles, originally a locally beloved food cart, relocated to this permanent takeout spot this summer — and it's been a morning staple for us ever since. There are just a couple of counter stools here but it's well worth your time and wallet. Go for the $5.75 curry fishballs over rice noodles and ask for all the sauces.

A container of rice noodles with curry fishballs.
Curry fishballs with rice noodles.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

House of Joy

House of Joy is one of the largest dim sum parlors in Manhattan’s Chinatown and one of the few restaurants in the area that still delivers its dim sum on carts. Grab a number from the host at the front and wait patiently to be called — which, if you don’t arrive before 11 a.m. on weekends, might be an hour or more. Once inside, plates of rice noodles, pineapple buns, pea shoots, and chicken feet cost a few dollars each, and there’s a full menu of larger meat and seafood dishes.

A custard bun shaped like a pig on a crowded table at a restaurant in Chinatown, House of Joy.
Dim sum at House of Joy.
Luke Fortney/Eater NY

Related Maps

Golden Diner

Samuel Yoo, an alum of Momofuku Ko and Major Food Group, opened this throwback diner in Two Bridges in 2019. Years later, it’s still a favorite place for brunch staples like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and fries that are served all day.

A cheeseburger with three pickles on top, plus fries, on a white plate with a striped lining.
The popular burger at Golden Diner.
Adam Moussa/Eater NY

Win Son Bakery

Pro: Win Son Bakery is home to one of the city’s best breakfast sandwiches — a bacon, egg, and cheese sandwich on a flakey scallion pancake. Con: Everyone already knows this, and the lines on weekend mornings often stretch out the door. First-timers, don’t be scared: The sandwich is worth it, and there’s lots of seating throughout the restaurant.

Two hands holding a folded scallion pancake egg and bacon sandwich.
The bacon, egg, and cheese scallion pancake at Win Son Bakery.
Gary He/Eater NY

Salty Lunch Lady's Little Luncheonette

Open on the weekends starting at 11:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. this Ridgewood newcomer is a charming spot to saddle up to one of the bar stools or tables and start your morning off with a sandwich and pie slice (think nostalgic, rotating options like banana cream). It’s an easygoing, order-at-the-counter sort of vibe where it's pretty guaranteed you’ll get a seat.

A sandwich topped with pickles at Salty Lunch Lady’s Little Luncheonette.
A sandwich at Salty Lunch Lady’s Little Luncheonette.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Colonia Verde

The best type of brunch in our opinion, is a dish that gives you a little taste of all the fixins. Colonia Verde’s sausage and veggie parrillada fits the bill: a giant platter of several types of sausages, veggies, dipping sauces, queso fundido, and arepas. The breakfast tacos, as well as the duck fried rice, are also great options as well. There’s plenty of seating in the back for groups.

Sausages, veggies, queso fundido, and arepas.
Emma Orlow/Eater NY

Peaches Restaurant

This popular Bed-Stuy restaurant has a brunch menu with fried chicken, seafood, and Southern sides. The steak with eggs, chicken with toast, and catfish with grits are all reliable, and a larger menu with crab cake sandwiches and shrimp po’ boys is served all day. There are other locations around Brooklyn.

Three pieces of flakey, fried chicken rest in a red-and-white checkered napkin in a takeout basket.
A basket of fried chicken from Peaches Hot House.
Clay Williams/Eater NY

Related Maps