clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
People lounging out on the lawn during a sunny, autumn day at Astoria Park.
A sunny day at Astoria Park.
James Andrews1/Shutterstock

The Best Restaurants in Astoria

The neighborhood is full of outstanding choices, from Greek seafood to Bangladeshi bhorta and Balkan cevapi

View as Map
A sunny day at Astoria Park.
| James Andrews1/Shutterstock

Originally named Hallet’s Cove, this Queens neighborhood along the East River was rechristened Astoria in an attempt to get financier John Jacob Astor to invest there. Nowadays, this vast neighborhood of brick and frame houses, with the east-west avenues given over to commercial enterprises, features one of the city’s most impressive collections of restaurants.

Few neighborhoods anywhere in New York can rival the diversity of cuisine running through Astoria, from storied Greek institutions to Egyptian seafood spots, Colombian bakeries, Mexican restaurants specializing in Oaxacan and Sinaloan fare, pizzerias now run by Albanians, Balkan cevapi parlors, and, of course, the requisite number of bars. Here’s where to eat and drink in Astoria right now.

Read More
Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Taverna Kyclades

Copy Link

There’s no shortage of competition in Astoria’s Greek scene, with an estimated 20 Greek restaurants, but Taverna Kyclades stands out. The seafood-heavy menu’s stars are the grilled octopus and heaping portions of grilled fish. Expect a wait for tables in the indoor and outdoor seating areas. There’s an additional less-crowded location in the East Village.

Two tentacles on a white plate with a sharp knife.
Grilled octopus at Taverna Kyclades.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

HinoMaru

Copy Link

HinoMaru’s barebones room with communal wooden tables belies the exceptional ramen served. There’s a creamy pork-based tonkatsu broth or savory soy vegetarian version, and prior to slurping the noodles, dishes like takoyaki (savory round octopus cakes) and crisp broccoli tempura (dribbled with sweet soy sauce), are a worthy diversion.

A dark wood restaurant exterior with a person standing out front, looking into the restaurant’s front window.
HinoMaru.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Bonnie

Copy Link

Hospitality group Sleeping Giant runs this gastropub in a sleek space with exposed brick and a sizeable backyard. The menu leans on hearty offerings like honey rosemary waffles topped with chicken schnitzel at brunch. For dinner it’s a burger adorned with pork belly and frizzled onions. Cocktails and a late-night menu available until 11:45 p.m. keep things going deep into the night.

Two hands cut a giant steak smeared with yellowish sauce and surrounded by french fries.
Steak and chips at the Bonnie.
The Bonnie

Sal, Kris & Charlie's Deli

Copy Link

This slim but efficient deli is popular with local workers, students, and sandwich aficionados alike, particularly for its meat-loaded signature, the Bomb, with five types of meat, three cheeses, and toppers of lettuce, tomato, and onion. Regulars know to grab a bag of chips and a beverage before stepping up to the counter, with cash ready and an exact order to share with the notoriously gruff staff. Cash only and no seating.

A cross-section of a sandwich stacked with meats, cheeses, and vegetables.
A hero from Sal, Kris & Charlie’s Deli.
Nadia Q. Ahmad/Eater NY

Loukoumi Astoria

Copy Link

Loukoumi is a Greek restaurant of more recent vintage, located in an obscure neighborhood and hence a little more relaxing overall. It is particularly known for its octopus dishes and vast range of colorful bread dips — from which you could make a whole meal, but its battered cod with garlicky skordalia, grilled sweetbreads, and orange-flavored Cypriot sausage are other menu delights.

Three bowls of Green bread dips, red, orange, and white.
Bread dips at Loukoumi.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Compton’s

Copy Link

This hip hop-themed sandwich shop (a sign on the wall proclaims “Straight Outta Astoria”) turns out what may be one of the city’s most elaborate breakfast sandwiches: two runny fried eggs, sausage, cheese, avocado, hash browns, and bright orange Sriracha mayo on a roll. Lots of hot and cold heroes, too, plus cheese steaks, smash burgers, and small fried snacks.

Breakfast sandwich and Greek fries
Breakfast sandwich and Greek fries at Compton’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Neptune Diner

Copy Link

Head to this neighborhood institution before it gets bulldozed. The blue-and-white paper placements at this open-till-midnight spot won’t let customers forget that it was once voted the best diner in Queens. Still, it’s a local favorite for hefty breakfast combos, multi-level hot sandwiches, and a nostalgic banana split. Greek options also abound, with waiters in penguin-esque suits.

A low white diner with orange mansard roof and elevated tracks in the background.
Neptune Diner on Astoria Boulevard.
Google Street Views

This Palestinian counter-service locale in Astoria’s Little Egypt is a dependable, inexpensive option in the neighborhood. Shawarma off a twirling spit roast is available in chicken or a mix of beef and lamb. Get it packed in a pita or fill up with a platter doused liberally with spicy harissa and Duzan sauces. Great vegetarian options, too.

A round serving of baba, with olive oil in the middle and sprinkles of red sumac and green parsley.
Duzan’s babaganoush is unsurpassed.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Little Morocco

Copy Link

If the diner had been invented in Casablanca or Rabat, this is what it would look like. The breezy corner storefront is the most fun in summer, when the sides swing open and the smell of sizzling tajines wafts out onto Steinway Street, served with the traditional baguette. Also to be admired are the opulent vegetable couscouses and the grilled merguez platter, all at shockingly low prices.

A brown ceramic vessel with red sauce, meatballs, and poached eggs, with bread on the side.
The meatball tajine at Little Morocco.”
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Kabab Cafe

Copy Link

This tiny spot in Astoria’s Little Egypt has been turning out Cairo- and Alexandria-style dishes since 1989. Chef Ali El Sayed whips up stews and grills meats, including offal like sweetbreads and lamb brain. Eating here is like sitting in Ali’s living room, and you’d better be prepared to convivially interact. Cash only.

A platter with bread dips, falafel, sliced apples, etc.
An appetizing platter at Kabab Cafe.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Parceros Bakery

Copy Link

This three-year-old restaurant is a narrow phantasmagoria of Colombian delights. The glass counter at the foyer leading to the dining area holds extra-large, freshly baked pastries like the almojabanas (cheese bread balls), arepa de choclo (sweet corn cakes), and a pan de yuca that’s the size of a human head and has a soft, glutinous texture.

A hand holding up a large, yellow baked good with a bite out of the top left corner.
Pan de yuca from Parceros Bakery.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

King of Falafel & Shawarma

Copy Link

Evolved from a well-known Palestinian food truck that opened a permanent location in 2015, King of Falafel & Shawarma offers its own spin on Levantine classics. The compact shop provides comfortable seating and a politicized clubhouse atmosphere in which all are made welcome, and the kebabs are righteously grilled over charcoal. The hummus topped with fava beans is particularly fine, and so are the triangular spinach pies.

A red and white interior, green chairs, a painting of Jerusalem, and baby in a stroller.
The interior of King of Falafel & Shawarma.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ruta Oaxaca

Copy Link

Ruta Oaxaca is one of the few Mexican restaurants in the city to specialize in Oaxacan food, and several of the state’s legendary moles are expertly rendered. Twelve types of taco are available, and the bar is stocked with over 50 artisanal Mezcals. Don’t miss the chicken in mole negro or the beef rib with mole coloradito, at this jazzy and colorful place.

A steak covered with grated cheese and vegetables in a pool of yellowish red sauce.
Steak with mole amarillo.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Pye Boat Noodle

Copy Link

This cozy, brightly colored Thai restaurant has a narrow indoor area that managed to fit in a full bar, as well as a romantic back garden with a fountain and pond. What is fundamentally hawker food, like yum woon sen (glass noodle salad), doesn’t skimp on flavor and heat. Signature boat noodles, thickened with pig blood, offer the option of four types of noodle dunked in a deep bath of pork, beef, or just vegetable broth. On the table, caddies of vinegary peppers, sugar, chili and garlic allow diners to customize their dishes.

A bowl of noodles with chopsticks laid across the top on a stool.
As the name implies. Pye Boat is a noodle destination.
Tanya Maithai/Eater NY

Sami's Kabab House

Copy Link

Owner Sami Zaman found a home for his Afghan specialties in this simple storefront adorned with rugs. Start with mantu dumplings delicately enveloping cumin-spiced beef and drenched in yogurt. Kebabs come with mammoth servings of meat on a bed of rice pilaf.

Chunks of grilled meats are piled on a white platter.
An assortment of kebabs from Sami’s.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Sotto La Luna

Copy Link

Sotto La Luna was the first to open in the World Artisan Market. The housemade pastas and pizzas — like the thick bucatini all’Amatriciana with braised Italian bacon, and the “angel and devil” Neapolitan pie with mozzarella, spicy soppressata, and hot honey — sometimes draw a packed house.

A man in a white apron slides a pizza onto a metal serving dish. A tiled pizza oven emblazoned with the restaurant’s name is off to the right.
The ‘Angel and Devil’ pie coming out of the oven at Sotto La Luna.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Snowdonia

Copy Link

Named after a national park in Wales, what might be the city’s only Welsh bar occupies an ancient corner barroom off the beaten path, and takes electronic music as its theme (there’s an old Buchla synth in one corner that sees weekly use). The menu runs from fish and chips to cod and kimchi tacos, with lots of things like shepherd’s pie and Yorkshire pudding along the way.

Two batter covered dogs in buns with red sauce.
Welsh rarebit hot dogs.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ćevabdžinica Sarajevo

Copy Link

This old-school mom-and-pop shop is a holdout from an era when the Balkan immigrant population was heavier in Astoria, and it has some of the best Balkan comfort foods the city has to offer. Its specialities include juicy cevapi sausages, saucy sarma stuffed cabbage, puffy lepinja bread, and a lightly sweet ajvar, a roasted red pepper and eggplant spread. Spend some time there and customers will inevitably see round trays of spinach pie cheese boureks going in and out of the oven.

Diners sit inside a sparse, casual dining room, eating and talking with each other.
Inside Ćevabdžinica Sarajevo.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Hello! Bangladesh

Copy Link

This new Bangladeshi restaurant offers a glorious steam table featuring dozens of dishes. for a fixed price. Or go for dishes priced individually — such as the freshwater fish of the day from Bangladeshi rivers, the goat’s foo- soup, or the small, vegetable-drive, mustard-oil-laced appetizing dishes called bhortas.

Two square plates loaded with colorful food selections.
A few selections from the steam table at Hello! Bangladesh.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Cielito Astoria

Copy Link

The focus of the seafood-heavy menu at this restaurant, cocktail lounge, and disco is the food of Sinora, Sinaloa, and the Baja Peninsula. Sure it’s got fish tacos, aguachiles, and ceviches galore, but why not try some of the less common dishes found in the city, include gobernador tacos with shrimp and cheese or bright red chilorio, served with flour tortillas.

Three flour-tortilla tacos filled with bright red shredded meat.
Cielito’s chilorio tacos.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Taverna Kyclades

There’s no shortage of competition in Astoria’s Greek scene, with an estimated 20 Greek restaurants, but Taverna Kyclades stands out. The seafood-heavy menu’s stars are the grilled octopus and heaping portions of grilled fish. Expect a wait for tables in the indoor and outdoor seating areas. There’s an additional less-crowded location in the East Village.

Two tentacles on a white plate with a sharp knife.
Grilled octopus at Taverna Kyclades.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

HinoMaru

HinoMaru’s barebones room with communal wooden tables belies the exceptional ramen served. There’s a creamy pork-based tonkatsu broth or savory soy vegetarian version, and prior to slurping the noodles, dishes like takoyaki (savory round octopus cakes) and crisp broccoli tempura (dribbled with sweet soy sauce), are a worthy diversion.

A dark wood restaurant exterior with a person standing out front, looking into the restaurant’s front window.
HinoMaru.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

The Bonnie

Hospitality group Sleeping Giant runs this gastropub in a sleek space with exposed brick and a sizeable backyard. The menu leans on hearty offerings like honey rosemary waffles topped with chicken schnitzel at brunch. For dinner it’s a burger adorned with pork belly and frizzled onions. Cocktails and a late-night menu available until 11:45 p.m. keep things going deep into the night.

Two hands cut a giant steak smeared with yellowish sauce and surrounded by french fries.
Steak and chips at the Bonnie.
The Bonnie

Sal, Kris & Charlie's Deli

This slim but efficient deli is popular with local workers, students, and sandwich aficionados alike, particularly for its meat-loaded signature, the Bomb, with five types of meat, three cheeses, and toppers of lettuce, tomato, and onion. Regulars know to grab a bag of chips and a beverage before stepping up to the counter, with cash ready and an exact order to share with the notoriously gruff staff. Cash only and no seating.

A cross-section of a sandwich stacked with meats, cheeses, and vegetables.
A hero from Sal, Kris & Charlie’s Deli.
Nadia Q. Ahmad/Eater NY

Loukoumi Astoria

Loukoumi is a Greek restaurant of more recent vintage, located in an obscure neighborhood and hence a little more relaxing overall. It is particularly known for its octopus dishes and vast range of colorful bread dips — from which you could make a whole meal, but its battered cod with garlicky skordalia, grilled sweetbreads, and orange-flavored Cypriot sausage are other menu delights.

Three bowls of Green bread dips, red, orange, and white.
Bread dips at Loukoumi.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Compton’s

This hip hop-themed sandwich shop (a sign on the wall proclaims “Straight Outta Astoria”) turns out what may be one of the city’s most elaborate breakfast sandwiches: two runny fried eggs, sausage, cheese, avocado, hash browns, and bright orange Sriracha mayo on a roll. Lots of hot and cold heroes, too, plus cheese steaks, smash burgers, and small fried snacks.

Breakfast sandwich and Greek fries
Breakfast sandwich and Greek fries at Compton’s.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Neptune Diner

Head to this neighborhood institution before it gets bulldozed. The blue-and-white paper placements at this open-till-midnight spot won’t let customers forget that it was once voted the best diner in Queens. Still, it’s a local favorite for hefty breakfast combos, multi-level hot sandwiches, and a nostalgic banana split. Greek options also abound, with waiters in penguin-esque suits.

A low white diner with orange mansard roof and elevated tracks in the background.
Neptune Diner on Astoria Boulevard.
Google Street Views

Duzan

This Palestinian counter-service locale in Astoria’s Little Egypt is a dependable, inexpensive option in the neighborhood. Shawarma off a twirling spit roast is available in chicken or a mix of beef and lamb. Get it packed in a pita or fill up with a platter doused liberally with spicy harissa and Duzan sauces. Great vegetarian options, too.

A round serving of baba, with olive oil in the middle and sprinkles of red sumac and green parsley.
Duzan’s babaganoush is unsurpassed.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Little Morocco

If the diner had been invented in Casablanca or Rabat, this is what it would look like. The breezy corner storefront is the most fun in summer, when the sides swing open and the smell of sizzling tajines wafts out onto Steinway Street, served with the traditional baguette. Also to be admired are the opulent vegetable couscouses and the grilled merguez platter, all at shockingly low prices.

A brown ceramic vessel with red sauce, meatballs, and poached eggs, with bread on the side.
The meatball tajine at Little Morocco.”
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Kabab Cafe

This tiny spot in Astoria’s Little Egypt has been turning out Cairo- and Alexandria-style dishes since 1989. Chef Ali El Sayed whips up stews and grills meats, including offal like sweetbreads and lamb brain. Eating here is like sitting in Ali’s living room, and you’d better be prepared to convivially interact. Cash only.

A platter with bread dips, falafel, sliced apples, etc.
An appetizing platter at Kabab Cafe.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Parceros Bakery

This three-year-old restaurant is a narrow phantasmagoria of Colombian delights. The glass counter at the foyer leading to the dining area holds extra-large, freshly baked pastries like the almojabanas (cheese bread balls), arepa de choclo (sweet corn cakes), and a pan de yuca that’s the size of a human head and has a soft, glutinous texture.

A hand holding up a large, yellow baked good with a bite out of the top left corner.
Pan de yuca from Parceros Bakery.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

King of Falafel & Shawarma

Evolved from a well-known Palestinian food truck that opened a permanent location in 2015, King of Falafel & Shawarma offers its own spin on Levantine classics. The compact shop provides comfortable seating and a politicized clubhouse atmosphere in which all are made welcome, and the kebabs are righteously grilled over charcoal. The hummus topped with fava beans is particularly fine, and so are the triangular spinach pies.

A red and white interior, green chairs, a painting of Jerusalem, and baby in a stroller.
The interior of King of Falafel & Shawarma.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ruta Oaxaca

Ruta Oaxaca is one of the few Mexican restaurants in the city to specialize in Oaxacan food, and several of the state’s legendary moles are expertly rendered. Twelve types of taco are available, and the bar is stocked with over 50 artisanal Mezcals. Don’t miss the chicken in mole negro or the beef rib with mole coloradito, at this jazzy and colorful place.

A steak covered with grated cheese and vegetables in a pool of yellowish red sauce.
Steak with mole amarillo.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Pye Boat Noodle

This cozy, brightly colored Thai restaurant has a narrow indoor area that managed to fit in a full bar, as well as a romantic back garden with a fountain and pond. What is fundamentally hawker food, like yum woon sen (glass noodle salad), doesn’t skimp on flavor and heat. Signature boat noodles, thickened with pig blood, offer the option of four types of noodle dunked in a deep bath of pork, beef, or just vegetable broth. On the table, caddies of vinegary peppers, sugar, chili and garlic allow diners to customize their dishes.

A bowl of noodles with chopsticks laid across the top on a stool.
As the name implies. Pye Boat is a noodle destination.
Tanya Maithai/Eater NY

Sami's Kabab House

Owner Sami Zaman found a home for his Afghan specialties in this simple storefront adorned with rugs. Start with mantu dumplings delicately enveloping cumin-spiced beef and drenched in yogurt. Kebabs come with mammoth servings of meat on a bed of rice pilaf.

Chunks of grilled meats are piled on a white platter.
An assortment of kebabs from Sami’s.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Related Maps

Sotto La Luna

Sotto La Luna was the first to open in the World Artisan Market. The housemade pastas and pizzas — like the thick bucatini all’Amatriciana with braised Italian bacon, and the “angel and devil” Neapolitan pie with mozzarella, spicy soppressata, and hot honey — sometimes draw a packed house.

A man in a white apron slides a pizza onto a metal serving dish. A tiled pizza oven emblazoned with the restaurant’s name is off to the right.
The ‘Angel and Devil’ pie coming out of the oven at Sotto La Luna.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Snowdonia

Named after a national park in Wales, what might be the city’s only Welsh bar occupies an ancient corner barroom off the beaten path, and takes electronic music as its theme (there’s an old Buchla synth in one corner that sees weekly use). The menu runs from fish and chips to cod and kimchi tacos, with lots of things like shepherd’s pie and Yorkshire pudding along the way.

Two batter covered dogs in buns with red sauce.
Welsh rarebit hot dogs.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Ćevabdžinica Sarajevo

This old-school mom-and-pop shop is a holdout from an era when the Balkan immigrant population was heavier in Astoria, and it has some of the best Balkan comfort foods the city has to offer. Its specialities include juicy cevapi sausages, saucy sarma stuffed cabbage, puffy lepinja bread, and a lightly sweet ajvar, a roasted red pepper and eggplant spread. Spend some time there and customers will inevitably see round trays of spinach pie cheese boureks going in and out of the oven.

Diners sit inside a sparse, casual dining room, eating and talking with each other.
Inside Ćevabdžinica Sarajevo.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Hello! Bangladesh

This new Bangladeshi restaurant offers a glorious steam table featuring dozens of dishes. for a fixed price. Or go for dishes priced individually — such as the freshwater fish of the day from Bangladeshi rivers, the goat’s foo- soup, or the small, vegetable-drive, mustard-oil-laced appetizing dishes called bhortas.

Two square plates loaded with colorful food selections.
A few selections from the steam table at Hello! Bangladesh.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Cielito Astoria

The focus of the seafood-heavy menu at this restaurant, cocktail lounge, and disco is the food of Sinora, Sinaloa, and the Baja Peninsula. Sure it’s got fish tacos, aguachiles, and ceviches galore, but why not try some of the less common dishes found in the city, include gobernador tacos with shrimp and cheese or bright red chilorio, served with flour tortillas.